5 ball mill working

ball mill_henan hongji mine machinery co., ltd

ball mill_henan hongji mine machinery co., ltd

The ball mill is the key equipment to crush the material after being crushed. This type of mill is equipped with a number of steel balls in its cylinder as grinding medium. When the barrel rotates, the grinding medium is attached to the wall lining of the barrel due to inertial centrifugal force. After rotating with the barrel body and reaching a certain height, the material in the barrel body will break due to gravity.

It is widely used in cement, silicate products, new building materials, refractories, fertilizers, black and non-ferrous metal beneficiation and glass and ceramics industries. It grinds various ores and other grindable materials dry or wet. Ball mill is suitable for grinding various ores and other materials. It is widely used in mineral processing, building materials and chemical industry. It can be divided into dry and wet grinding methods. According to the different ways of discharging, it can be divided into two types: grid type and overflow type.

planetary ball mill

planetary ball mill

The 911MPEPB500 Planetary Ball Mills are used for fine grinding of soft, hard to brittle or fibrous materials. Dry and wet grindings are possible. They support the daily sample preparation for laboratory- and development usage.

Planetary Ball Mills consist of several cylindrical grinding jars (positioned on the sun wheel as shown on the figure) which are filled with loose grinding balls. Two superimposed rotational movements move the grinding jars:

Like in a planetary system the grinding jar rotates on a orbit around the centre. This rotational movement is the self-rotation of the grinding container superimposed. The resulting centrifugal and acting acceleration forces lead to strong grinding effects. Furthermore there are forces working according to the coriolis acceleration. The result is an intensive grinding effect between the grinding balls and the sample.

Depending on the speed ratio different movement patters of the grinding balls / media can be achieved. It can be achieved that the grinding media are crossing the grinding jar and loosen from the wall. At hitting the wall of the grinding jar the sample will be stressed. At a different motion pattern the grinding balls roll over the sample and stress the ground material.

The selection of the right grinding jar and the correct filling level has a big impact on the grinding result. According to the application you have to select the correct material and amount/volume for the grinding jar and the grinding balls.

A jar filling should consist of about 1/3 sample and 1/3 ball charge. The remaining third is the free jar volume that is necessary for the movement of the balls. The following table provides recommendations.

Planetary ball mill is a very often used machine for mechanical alloying, especially in Europe. Because very small amount of powder (for example, as little as a few grammes), is required, the machine is suitable for research purposes in the laboratory. A typical planetary ball mill consists of one turn disc (sometimes called turn table) and two or four bowls. The turn disc rotates in one direction while the bowls rotate in the opposite direction. The centrifugal forces created by the rotation of the Mechanical Alloying.

A short milling duration of only 30 to 60 min. In cases where relatively high temperature is necessary to promote reaction rate, even this may be an added advantage to the process. In addition, the planetary ball mill may be modified by incorporating temperature control elements.

Two types of bowls are commercially available: steel including hardened chrome steel, stainless CrNi-steel and hardmetal tungsten carbide (WC+Co) and ceramic bowls including sintered corundum (Al2O3), agate (SiO2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2). They generally are available in three different sizes of 80, 250 and 500ml. For high energy mechanical alloying, however, steel bowls are recommended since ceramic bowls can cause contamination due to minute chipped off or fractured particles from the brittle surfaces of the milling bowl and balls. Generally, bowls and balls of the same material are employed in the mechanical alloying process to avoid the possibility of cross contamination from different materials.

Based on powder particle size and impact energy required, balls with size of 10 to 30 mm are normally used. If the size of the balls is too small, impact energy may be too low for alloying to take place. In order to increase impact energy without increasing the rotational speed, balls with high density such as tungsten balls may be employed. Table 2.1 gives the recommended number of balls per bowl to be applied.

Table 2.2 gives a summary of abrasion properties and densities for the selection of bowl and ball materials. It can be seen that the oxide materials show the lowest density while tungsten carbide, the highest density. Hence, at the same rotational speed and ball size, the oxide ball with the lowest density will generate the lowest collision energy.

Another popular mill for conducting MA experiments is the planetary ball mill (referred to as Pulverisette) in which a few hundred grams of the powder can be milled at the same time (Fig. 4.4). These are manufactured by Fritsch GmbH (Industriestrae 8. D-55743 Idar-Oberstein, Germany; +49-6784-70 146 www.FRITSCH.de) and marketed by Gilson Co. in the United States and Canada (P.O. Box 200, Lewis Center, OH 43085-0677, USA, Tel: 1-800-444-1508 or 740-548-7298; www.globalgilson.com). The planetary ball mill owes its name to the planet-like movement of its vials. These are arranged on a rotating support disk, and a special drive mechanism causes them to rotate around their own axes. The centrifugal force produced by the vials rotating around their own axes and that produced by the rotating support disk both act on the vial contents, consisting of the material to be ground and the grinding balls. Since the vials and the supporting disk rotate in opposite directions, the centrifugal forces alternately act in like and opposite directions. This causes the grinding balls to run down the inside wall of the vialthe friction effect, followed by the material being ground and the grinding balls lifting off and traveling freely through the inner chamber of the vial and colliding with the opposing inside wallthe impact effect. The grinding balls impacting with each other intensify the impact effect considerably.

The grinding balls in the planetary mills acquire much higher impact energy than is possible with simple pure gravity or centrifugal mills. The impact energy acquired depends on the speed of the planetary mill and can reach about 20 times the earths acceleration. As the speed is reduced, the grinding balls lose the impact energy, and when the energy is sufficiently low there is no grinding involved; only mixing occurs in the sample.

Even though the disk and the vial rotation speeds could not be independently controlled in the early versions, it is possible to do so in the modern versions of the Fritsch planetary ball mills. In a single mill one can have either two (Pulverisette 5 or 7) or four (Pulverisette 5) milling stations. Recently, a single-station mill was also developed (Pulverisette 6). Three different sizes of containers, with capacities of 80. 250, and 500 ml. are available. Grinding vials and balls are available in eight different materials agate, silicon nitride, sintered corundum, zirconia, chrome steel, Cr-Ni steel, tungsten carbide, and plastic polyamide. Even though the linear velocity of the balls in this type of mill is higher than that in the SPEX mills, the frequency of impacts is much less than in the SPEX mills. Hence, in comparison to SPEX mills, Fritsch Pulverisette can be considered as lower energy mills.

Some high-energy planetary ball mills have been developed by Russian scientists, and these have been designated as AGO mills, such as AGO-2U and AGO-2M. The high energy of these mills is derived from the very high rotation speeds that are achievable. For example, Salimon et al. used their planetary ball mill at a rotation speed of 1235 rpm corresponding to the mill energy intensity of 50 W/g. It has been reported that some of these mills can be used at rotation speeds greater than 2000 rpm.

A recent development in the design of the Fritsch mills has been the incorporation of a gas pressure and temperature measuring system (GTM) for in situ data acquisition during milling. Generally, the occurrence of phase changes in the milled powder is interpreted or inferred by analyzing the powder constitution after milling has been stopped. Sometimes a small quantity of the powder is removed from the charge in the mill and analyzed to obtain information on the progress of alloying and/or phase transformations. This method could lead to some errors because the state of the powder during milling could be different from what it is after the milling has been stopped. To overcome this difficulty, Fritsch GmbH developed the GTM system to enable the operator to obtain data during milling.

The basic idea of this measuring system is the quick and continuous determination of temperature and pressure during the milling process. The temperature measured corresponds to the total temperature rise in the system due to the combination of grinding, impact, and phase transformation processes. Since the heat capacity of the container and the grinding medium is much higher than the mass of the powder, it is necessary to have a sensitive temperature measurement in order to derive meaningful information. Accordingly, a continuous and sensitive measurement of gas pressure inside the milling container is carried out to measure very quickly and detect small temperature changes. The measured gas pressure includes not only information about the temperature increase due to friction, impact forces, and phase transformations, but also the interaction of gases with the fresh surfaces formed during the milling operation (adsorption and desorption of gases). The continual and highly sensitive measurement of the gas pressure within the milling container facilitates detection of abrupt and minute changes in the reactions occurring inside the vial. The pressure could be measured in the range of 0-700 kPa, with a resolution of 0.175 kPa, which translates to a temperature resolution of 0.025 K.

Bachin et al carried out MA of dispersion-strengthened, nickel-base superalloys in a centrifugal planetary ball mill. The mechanics of this mill are characterized by the rotational speed of the plate p, that of the container relative to the plate v, the mass of the charge, the size of the ball, the ball to powder ratio and the radius of the container. A schematic of the planetary ball mill is shown in Fig.2.4. Figure 2.5 shows a laboratory planetary mill.

diameters (0.5 to 2.5 m) to achieve high energy by rotating it just below the critical speeds c (up to 0.9 c ). Even though the time required to accomplish MA by these mills is longer compared to attritor mills, the overall economics are favourable.

As far as the grinding media are concerned, common practice is to use hardened high carbon-high chromium steel balls (4 to 12 mm diameter), normally specified for ball bearings. Stainless steel balls have also been used. When it is necessary to minimize iron contamination in the charge, balls of tungsten carbide have also been used. When necessary, the balls have been coated with the necessary oxide that was to be dispersed in the composition to be mechanically alloyed.

ball mill - an overview | sciencedirect topics

ball mill - an overview | sciencedirect topics

The ball mill accepts the SAG or AG mill product. Ball mills give a controlled final grind and produce flotation feed of a uniform size. Ball mills tumble iron or steel balls with the ore. The balls are initially 510 cm diameter but gradually wear away as grinding of the ore proceeds. The feed to ball mills (dry basis) is typically 75 vol.-% ore and 25% steel.

The ball mill is operated in closed circuit with a particle-size measurement device and size-control cyclones. The cyclones send correct-size material on to flotation and direct oversize material back to the ball mill for further grinding.

Grinding elements in ball mills travel at different velocities. Therefore, collision force, direction and kinetic energy between two or more elements vary greatly within the ball charge. Frictional wear or rubbing forces act on the particles, as well as collision energy. These forces are derived from the rotational motion of the balls and movement of particles within the mill and contact zones of colliding balls.

By rotation of the mill body, due to friction between mill wall and balls, the latter rise in the direction of rotation till a helix angle does not exceed the angle of repose, whereupon, the balls roll down. Increasing of rotation rate leads to growth of the centrifugal force and the helix angle increases, correspondingly, till the component of weight strength of balls become larger than the centrifugal force. From this moment the balls are beginning to fall down, describing during falling certain parabolic curves (Figure 2.7). With the further increase of rotation rate, the centrifugal force may become so large that balls will turn together with the mill body without falling down. The critical speed n (rpm) when the balls are attached to the wall due to centrifugation:

where Dm is the mill diameter in meters. The optimum rotational speed is usually set at 6580% of the critical speed. These data are approximate and may not be valid for metal particles that tend to agglomerate by welding.

The degree of filling the mill with balls also influences productivity of the mill and milling efficiency. With excessive filling, the rising balls collide with falling ones. Generally, filling the mill by balls must not exceed 3035% of its volume.

The mill productivity also depends on many other factors: physical-chemical properties of feed material, filling of the mill by balls and their sizes, armor surface shape, speed of rotation, milling fineness and timely moving off of ground product.

where b.ap is the apparent density of the balls; l is the degree of filling of the mill by balls; n is revolutions per minute; 1, and 2 are coefficients of efficiency of electric engine and drive, respectively.

A feature of ball mills is their high specific energy consumption; a mill filled with balls, working idle, consumes approximately as much energy as at full-scale capacity, i.e. during grinding of material. Therefore, it is most disadvantageous to use a ball mill at less than full capacity.

The ball mill is a tumbling mill that uses steel balls as the grinding media. The length of the cylindrical shell is usually 11.5 times the shell diameter (Figure 8.11). The feed can be dry, with less than 3% moisture to minimize ball coating, or slurry containing 2040% water by weight. Ball mills are employed in either primary or secondary grinding applications. In primary applications, they receive their feed from crushers, and in secondary applications, they receive their feed from rod mills, AG mills, or SAG mills.

Ball mills are filled up to 40% with steel balls (with 3080mm diameter), which effectively grind the ore. The material that is to be ground fills the voids between the balls. The tumbling balls capture the particles in ball/ball or ball/liner events and load them to the point of fracture.

When hard pebbles rather than steel balls are used for the grinding media, the mills are known as pebble mills. As mentioned earlier, pebble mills are widely used in the North American taconite iron ore operations. Since the weight of pebbles per unit volume is 3555% of that of steel balls, and as the power input is directly proportional to the volume weight of the grinding medium, the power input and capacity of pebble mills are correspondingly lower. Thus, in a given grinding circuit, for a certain feed rate, a pebble mill would be much larger than a ball mill, with correspondingly a higher capital cost. However, the increase in capital cost is justified economically by a reduction in operating cost attributed to the elimination of steel grinding media.

In general, ball mills can be operated either wet or dry and are capable of producing products in the order of 100m. This represents reduction ratios of as great as 100. Very large tonnages can be ground with these ball mills because they are very effective material handling devices. Ball mills are rated by power rather than capacity. Today, the largest ball mill in operation is 8.53m diameter and 13.41m long with a corresponding motor power of 22MW (Toromocho, private communications).

Planetary ball mills. A planetary ball mill consists of at least one grinding jar, which is arranged eccentrically on a so-called sun wheel. The direction of movement of the sun wheel is opposite to that of the grinding jars according to a fixed ratio. The grinding balls in the grinding jars are subjected to superimposed rotational movements. The jars are moved around their own axis and, in the opposite direction, around the axis of the sun wheel at uniform speed and uniform rotation ratios. The result is that the superimposition of the centrifugal forces changes constantly (Coriolis motion). The grinding balls describe a semicircular movement, separate from the inside wall, and collide with the opposite surface at high impact energy. The difference in speeds produces an interaction between frictional and impact forces, which releases high dynamic energies. The interplay between these forces produces the high and very effective degree of size reduction of the planetary ball mill. Planetary ball mills are smaller than common ball mills, and are mainly used in laboratories for grinding sample material down to very small sizes.

Vibration mill. Twin- and three-tube vibrating mills are driven by an unbalanced drive. The entire filling of the grinding cylinders, which comprises the grinding media and the feed material, constantly receives impulses from the circular vibrations in the body of the mill. The grinding action itself is produced by the rotation of the grinding media in the opposite direction to the driving rotation and by continuous head-on collisions of the grinding media. The residence time of the material contained in the grinding cylinders is determined by the quantity of the flowing material. The residence time can also be influenced by using damming devices. The sample passes through the grinding cylinders in a helical curve and slides down from the inflow to the outflow. The high degree of fineness achieved is the result of this long grinding procedure. Continuous feeding is carried out by vibrating feeders, rotary valves, or conveyor screws. The product is subsequently conveyed either pneumatically or mechanically. They are basically used to homogenize food and feed.

CryoGrinder. As small samples (100 mg or <20 ml) are difficult to recover from a standard mortar and pestle, the CryoGrinder serves as an alternative. The CryoGrinder is a miniature mortar shaped as a small well and a tightly fitting pestle. The CryoGrinder is prechilled, then samples are added to the well and ground by a handheld cordless screwdriver. The homogenization and collection of the sample is highly efficient. In environmental analysis, this system is used when very small samples are available, such as small organisms or organs (brains, hepatopancreas, etc.).

The vibratory ball mill is another kind of high-energy ball mill that is used mainly for preparing amorphous alloys. The vials capacities in the vibratory mills are smaller (about 10 ml in volume) compared to the previous types of mills. In this mill, the charge of the powder and milling tools are agitated in three perpendicular directions (Fig. 1.6) at very high speed, as high as 1200 rpm.

Another type of the vibratory ball mill, which is used at the van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratory, consists of a stainless steel vial with a hardened steel bottom, and a single hardened steel ball of 6 cm in diameter (Fig. 1.7).

The mill is evacuated during milling to a pressure of 106 Torr, in order to avoid reactions with a gas atmosphere.[44] Subsequently, this mill is suitable for mechanical alloying of some special systems that are highly reactive with the surrounding atmosphere, such as rare earth elements.

A ball mill is a relatively simple apparatus in which the motion of the reactor, or of a part of it, induces a series of collisions of balls with each other and with the reactor walls (Suryanarayana, 2001). At each collision, a fraction of the powder inside the reactor is trapped between the colliding surfaces of the milling tools and submitted to a mechanical load at relatively high strain rates (Suryanarayana, 2001). This load generates a local nonhydrostatic mechanical stress at every point of contact between any pair of powder particles. The specific features of the deformation processes induced by these stresses depend on the intensity of the mechanical stresses themselves, on the details of the powder particle arrangement, that is on the topology of the contact network, and on the physical and chemical properties of powders (Martin et al., 2003; Delogu, 2008a). At the end of any given collision event, the powder that has been trapped is remixed with the powder that has not undergone this process. Correspondingly, at any instant in the mechanical processing, the whole powder charge includes fractions of powder that have undergone a different number of collisions.

The individual reactive processes at the perturbed interface between metallic elements are expected to occur on timescales that are, at most, comparable with the collision duration (Hammerberg et al., 1998; Urakaev and Boldyrev, 2000; Lund and Schuh, 2003; Delogu and Cocco, 2005a,b). Therefore, unless the ball mill is characterized by unusually high rates of powder mixing and frequency of collisions, reactive events initiated by local deformation processes at a given collision are not affected by a successive collision. Indeed, the time interval between successive collisions is significantly longer than the time period required by local structural perturbations for full relaxation (Hammerberg et al., 1998; Urakaev and Boldyrev, 2000; Lund and Schuh, 2003; Delogu and Cocco, 2005a,b).

These few considerations suffice to point out the two fundamental features of powder processing by ball milling, which in turn govern the MA processes in ball mills. First, mechanical processing by ball milling is a discrete processing method. Second, it has statistical character. All of this has important consequences for the study of the kinetics of MA processes. The fact that local deformation events are connected to individual collisions suggests that absolute time is not an appropriate reference quantity to describe mechanically induced phase transformations. Such a description should rather be made as a function of the number of collisions (Delogu et al., 2004). A satisfactory description of the MA kinetics must also account for the intrinsic statistical character of powder processing by ball milling. The amount of powder trapped in any given collision, at the end of collision is indeed substantially remixed with the other powder in the reactor. It follows that the same amount, or a fraction of it, could at least in principle be trapped again in the successive collision.

This is undoubtedly a difficult aspect to take into account in a mathematical description of MA kinetics. There are at least two extreme cases to consider. On the one hand, it could be assumed that the powder trapped in a given collision cannot be trapped in the successive one. On the other, it could be assumed that powder mixing is ideal and that the amount of powder trapped at a given collision has the same probability of being processed in the successive collision. Both these cases allow the development of a mathematical model able to describe the relationship between apparent kinetics and individual collision events. However, the latter assumption seems to be more reliable than the former one, at least for commercial mills characterized by relatively complex displacement in the reactor (Manai et al., 2001, 2004).

A further obvious condition for the successful development of a mathematical description of MA processes is the one related to the uniformity of collision regimes. More specifically, it is highly desirable that the powders trapped at impact always experience the same conditions. This requires the control of the ball dynamics inside the reactor, which can be approximately obtained by using a single milling ball and an amount of powder large enough to assure inelastic impact conditions (Manai et al., 2001, 2004; Delogu et al., 2004). In fact, the use of a single milling ball avoids impacts between balls, which have a remarkable disordering effect on the ball dynamics, whereas inelastic impact conditions permit the establishment of regular and periodic ball dynamics (Manai et al., 2001, 2004; Delogu et al., 2004).

All of the above assumptions and observations represent the basis and guidelines for the development of the mathematical model briefly outlined in the following. It has been successfully applied to the case of a Spex Mixer/ Mill mod. 8000, but the same approach can, in principle, be used for other ball mills.

The Planetary ball mills are the most popular mills used in MM, MA, and MD scientific researches for synthesizing almost all of the materials presented in Figure 1.1. In this type of mill, the milling media have considerably high energy, because milling stock and balls come off the inner wall of the vial (milling bowl or vial) and the effective centrifugal force reaches up to 20 times gravitational acceleration.

The centrifugal forces caused by the rotation of the supporting disc and autonomous turning of the vial act on the milling charge (balls and powders). Since the turning directions of the supporting disc and the vial are opposite, the centrifugal forces alternately are synchronized and opposite. Therefore, the milling media and the charged powders alternatively roll on the inner wall of the vial, and are lifted and thrown off across the bowl at high speed, as schematically presented in Figure 2.17.

However, there are some companies in the world who manufacture and sell number of planetary-type ball mills; Fritsch GmbH (www.fritsch-milling.com) and Retsch (http://www.retsch.com) are considered to be the oldest and principal companies in this area.

Fritsch produces different types of planetary ball mills with different capacities and rotation speeds. Perhaps, Fritsch Pulverisette P5 (Figure 2.18(a)) and Fritsch Pulverisette P6 (Figure 2.18(b)) are the most popular models of Fritsch planetary ball mills. A variety of vials and balls made of different materials with different capacities, starting from 80ml up to 500ml, are available for the Fritsch Pulverisette planetary ball mills; these include tempered steel, stainless steel, tungsten carbide, agate, sintered corundum, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide. Figure 2.19 presents 80ml-tempered steel vial (a) and 500ml-agate vials (b) together with their milling media that are made of the same materials.

Figure 2.18. Photographs of Fritsch planetary-type high-energy ball mill of (a) Pulverisette P5 and (b) Pulverisette P6. The equipment is housed in the Nanotechnology Laboratory, Energy and Building Research Center (EBRC), Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR).

Figure 2.19. Photographs of the vials used for Fritsch planetary ball mills with capacity of (a) 80ml and (b) 500ml. The vials and the balls shown in (a) and (b) are made of tempered steel agate materials, respectively (Nanotechnology Laboratory, Energy and Building Research Center (EBRC), Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR)).

More recently and in year 2011, Fritsch GmbH (http://www.fritsch-milling.com) introduced a new high-speed and versatile planetary ball mill called Planetary Micro Mill PULVERISETTE 7 (Figure 2.20). The company claims this new ball mill will be helpful to enable extreme high-energy ball milling at rotational speed reaching to 1,100rpm. This allows the new mill to achieve sensational centrifugal accelerations up to 95 times Earth gravity. They also mentioned that the energy application resulted from this new machine is about 150% greater than the classic planetary mills. Accordingly, it is expected that this new milling machine will enable the researchers to get their milled powders in short ball-milling time with fine powder particle sizes that can reach to be less than 1m in diameter. The vials available for this new type of mill have sizes of 20, 45, and 80ml. Both the vials and balls can be made of the same materials, which are used in the manufacture of large vials used for the classic Fritsch planetary ball mills, as shown in the previous text.

Retsch has also produced a number of capable high-energy planetary ball mills with different capacities (http://www.retsch.com/products/milling/planetary-ball-mills/); namely Planetary Ball Mill PM 100 (Figure 2.21(a)), Planetary Ball Mill PM 100 CM, Planetary Ball Mill PM 200, and Planetary Ball Mill PM 400 (Figure 2.21(b)). Like Fritsch, Retsch offers high-quality ball-milling vials with different capacities (12, 25, 50, 50, 125, 250, and 500ml) and balls of different diameters (540mm), as exemplified in Figure 2.22. These milling tools can be made of hardened steel as well as other different materials such as carbides, nitrides, and oxides.

Figure 2.21. Photographs of Retsch planetary-type high-energy ball mill of (a) PM 100 and (b) PM 400. The equipment is housed in the Nanotechnology Laboratory, Energy and Building Research Center (EBRC), Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR).

Figure 2.22. Photographs of the vials used for Retsch planetary ball mills with capacity of (a) 80ml, (b) 250ml, and (c) 500ml. The vials and the balls shown are made of tempered steel (Nanotechnology Laboratory, Energy and Building Research Center (EBRC), Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR)).

Both Fritsch and Retsch companies have offered special types of vials that allow monitoring and measure the gas pressure and temperature inside the vial during the high-energy planetary ball-milling process. Moreover, these vials allow milling the powders under inert (e.g., argon or helium) or reactive gas (e.g., hydrogen or nitrogen) with a maximum gas pressure of 500kPa (5bar). It is worth mentioning here that such a development made on the vials design allows the users and researchers to monitor the progress tackled during the MA and MD processes by following up the phase transformations and heat realizing upon RBM, where the interaction of the gas used with the freshly created surfaces of the powders during milling (adsorption, absorption, desorption, and decomposition) can be monitored. Furthermore, the data of the temperature and pressure driven upon using this system is very helpful when the ball mills are used for the formation of stable (e.g., intermetallic compounds) and metastable (e.g., amorphous and nanocrystalline materials) phases. In addition, measuring the vial temperature during blank (without samples) high-energy ball mill can be used as an indication to realize the effects of friction, impact, and conversion processes.

More recently, Evico-magnetics (www.evico-magnetics.de) has manufactured an extraordinary high-pressure milling vial with gas-temperature-monitoring (GTM) system. Likewise both system produced by Fritsch and Retsch, the developed system produced by Evico-magnetics, allowing RBM but at very high gas pressure that can reach to 15,000kPa (150bar). In addition, it allows in situ monitoring of temperature and of pressure by incorporating GTM. The vials, which can be used with any planetary mills, are made of hardened steel with capacity up to 220ml. The manufacturer offers also two-channel system for simultaneous use of two milling vials.

Using different ball mills as examples, it has been shown that, on the basis of the theory of glancing collision of rigid bodies, the theoretical calculation of tPT conditions and the kinetics of mechanochemical processes are possible for the reactors that are intended to perform different physicochemical processes during mechanical treatment of solids. According to the calculations, the physicochemical effect of mechanochemical reactors is due to short-time impulses of pressure (P = ~ 10101011 dyn cm2) with shift, and temperature T(x, t). The highest temperature impulse T ~ 103 K are caused by the dry friction phenomenon.

Typical spatial and time parameters of the impactfriction interaction of the particles with a size R ~ 104 cm are as follows: localization region, x ~ 106 cm; time, t ~ 108 s. On the basis of the obtained theoretical results, the effect of short-time contact fusion of particles treated in various comminuting devices can play a key role in the mechanism of activation and chemical reactions for wide range of mechanochemical processes. This role involves several aspects, that is, the very fact of contact fusion transforms the solid phase process onto another qualitative level, judging from the mass transfer coefficients. The spatial and time characteristics of the fused zone are such that quenching of non-equilibrium defects and intermediate products of chemical reactions occurs; solidification of the fused zone near the contact point results in the formation of a nanocrystal or nanoamor- phous state. The calculation models considered above and the kinetic equations obtained using them allow quantitative ab initio estimates of rate constants to be performed for any specific processes of mechanical activation and chemical transformation of the substances in ball mills.

There are two classes of ball mills: planetary and mixer (also called swing) mill. The terms high-speed vibration milling (HSVM), high-speed ball milling (HSBM), and planetary ball mill (PBM) are often used. The commercial apparatus are PBMs Fritsch P-5 and Fritsch Pulverisettes 6 and 7 classic line, the Retsch shaker (or mixer) mills ZM1, MM200, MM400, AS200, the Spex 8000, 6750 freezer/mill SPEX CertiPrep, and the SWH-0.4 vibrational ball mill. In some instances temperature controlled apparatus were used (58MI1); freezer/mills were used in some rare cases (13MOP1824).

The balls are made of stainless steel, agate (SiO2), zirconium oxide (ZrO2), or silicon nitride (Si3N). The use of stainless steel will contaminate the samples with steel particles and this is a problem both for solid-state NMR and for drug purity.

However, there are many types of ball mills (see Chapter 2 for more details), such as drum ball mills, jet ball mills, bead-mills, roller ball mills, vibration ball mills, and planetary ball mills, they can be grouped or classified into two types according to their rotation speed, as follows: (i) high-energy ball mills and (ii) low-energy ball mills. Table 3.1 presents characteristics and comparison between three types of ball mills (attritors, vibratory mills, planetary ball mills and roller mills) that are intensively used on MA, MD, and MM techniques.

In fact, choosing the right ball mill depends on the objectives of the process and the sort of materials (hard, brittle, ductile, etc.) that will be subjecting to the ball-milling process. For example, the characteristics and properties of those ball mills used for reduction in the particle size of the starting materials via top-down approach, or so-called mechanical milling (MM process), or for mechanically induced solid-state mixing for fabrications of composite and nanocomposite powders may differ widely from those mills used for achieving mechanically induced solid-state reaction (MISSR) between the starting reactant materials of elemental powders (MA process), or for tackling dramatic phase transformation changes on the structure of the starting materials (MD). Most of the ball mills in the market can be employed for different purposes and for preparing of wide range of new materials.

Martinez-Sanchez et al. [4] have pointed out that employing of high-energy ball mills not only contaminates the milled amorphous powders with significant volume fractions of impurities that come from milling media that move at high velocity, but it also affects the stability and crystallization properties of the formed amorphous phase. They have proved that the properties of the formed amorphous phase (Mo53Ni47) powder depends on the type of the ball-mill equipment (SPEX 8000D Mixer/Mill and Zoz Simoloter mill) used in their important investigations. This was indicated by the high contamination content of oxygen on the amorphous powders prepared by SPEX 8000D Mixer/Mill, when compared with the corresponding amorphous powders prepared by Zoz Simoloter mill. Accordingly, they have attributed the poor stabilities, indexed by the crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase formed by SPEX 8000D Mixer/Mill to the presence of foreign matter (impurities).

laboratory ball mills at best price in india

laboratory ball mills at best price in india

Byraveshwara Industrial Estate, Bengaluru 32/33, Extended Sai Baba Layout, 40 Feet Road, Near Anupama School Andrahalli Main Road, Peenya, 2nd Stage, Byraveshwara Industrial Estate, Bengaluru - 560091, Dist. Bengaluru, Karnataka

mixer mill mm 500 vario - retsch - grinding down to the nanometer range

mixer mill mm 500 vario - retsch - grinding down to the nanometer range

The new Mixer Mill MM 500 vario is a versatile bench-top unit which provides ultimate performance with maximum flexibility for your sample preparation process. It is used for dry, wet and cryogenic grinding of small sample amounts with high throughput. The MM 500 vario can be equipped with screw-top grinding jars from 1.5 ml to 50 ml. Available materials include hardened steel, stainless steel, tungsten carbide, agate, zirconium oxide, PTFE. For biological applications such as homogenization of plant materials, tissues or for cell disruption via bead beating, the MM500vario can be equipped with different adapters for single-use vials from 0.2 - 5 ml.

Mixer mills are widely used for homogenizing biological samples such as tissue, liver, muscle, plants, corn or sputum. For cell disruption via bead beating mixer mills are also the perfect solution. The MM 500 vario accommodates adapters for different single-use vials: 0.2 ml / 1.5 ml / 2 ml / 5 ml Depending on the tube and the type of adapter, 5-10 tubes can be inserted per adapter, resulting in the following maximum vial capacity per batch: 50 x 1.5 or 2 ml (or 60 x 0.2 ml)20 x 5 ml Typical grinding / homogenizing processes of biological materials take less than 2 min. Cell disruption with a good reproducibility and efficiency takes20 sec to 5 min, depending on the cell type. Cryogenic grinding in single-use vials can also be a suitable way to pulverize tough or temperature-sensitive samples.

All grinding jars of the smaller MM400 model are compatible with the MM500vario. The nominal volume ranges from 1.5 ml to 50 ml and available materials include hardened steel, stainless steel, agate, tungsten carbide, zirconium oxide and PTFE, ensuring contamination-free sample preparation.

RETSCH mixer mills are true allrounders. They homogenize, for example, waste, soil, chemical products, coated tablets, drugs, ores, grain, tissue, glass, hair, ceramics, bones, plastics, alloys, minerals, oil seeds, plants, sewage sludge, pills, textiles, wool etc.

The grinding jars of the mixer mill MM 500 vario perform radial oscillations in a horizontal position. The inertia of the grinding balls causes them to impact with high energy on the sample material at the rounded ends of the grinding jars and pulverize it. Also, the movement of the grinding jars combined with the movement of the balls result in the intensive mixing of the sample. The degree of mixing can be increased even further by using several smaller balls.

As the leading solution provider for sample preparation equipment, RETSCH has taken operating convenience to the next level and created the new RETSCH App. This tool makes working with your RETSCH mill easy and convenient:

bond work index - an overview | sciencedirect topics

bond work index - an overview | sciencedirect topics

The Bond work index is not solely a material constant but is influenced by the grinding conditions. For example, the finer the grind size desired, the higher is the kWh/t required to grind to that size. Magdalinovic [38] measured the Bond work index of three ore types using different test screen sizes. He produced a correlation between the mass of test screen undersize per revolution, G, and the square root of the test screen size, D:

The constant K2 is also dependent on ore type and ranged from 1.4 to 1.5. A regression of Magdalinovics data including the feed 80% passing size gives an average value of 1.485 for K2. If we extend this relationship to any sample of screened material then this gives an approximate estimate of the 80% passing size as 67.3% of the top size. This compares with a value of 66.7% of the 99% passing size obtained from data in Table3.3.

Using Magdalinovics method, from the results of a Bond work index test at a single test screen size, the constants K1 and K2 can be calculated and from these values, the work index at any test screen size can be estimated.

An alternative approach to determine the effect of closing screen size on the Bond ball mill work index (BWi), in the absence of extensive test work, is to use computer simulation. The batch grinding process has been modelled using the sizemass balance approach (Austin [37], Chapter11) and if we can do this, then we can effectively simulate the Bond ball mill work index test. Yan and Eaton [39] measured the selection function and breakage distribution parameters for the Austin grinding model and demonstrated the BWi simulation with soft and medium/hard ore samples. The measured BWi was 14.0 and 6.6kWh/t for the medium/hard and soft ore, respectively, at a closing screen size of 106 m compared with the simulated values of 13.2 and 5.6kWh/t.

The ability to simulate the Bond work index test also allows examination of truncated ball mill feed size distributions on the work index. For grinding circuits where the feed to a ballmill is sent directly to the classifier and the cyclone underflow feeds the ball mill (see Figure3.10), a question arises as to whether this practice will alter the ball mill work index (BWi) of the material being ground and hence have an impact on the energy used in the mill for grinding. Some might conclude that a higher percentage of coarse material in the mill feed will increase the amount of material that needs to be ground to produce the end product and hence it will affect the BWi. Others, in the absence of contrary evidence, assume that there is no change in the work index. Figure3.11 shows the typical circuit represented by the standard Bond work index correlation and Figure3.10 represents the scalped or truncated feed case.

The procedure for the work index test bases the BWi value on the calculation of new fines generated in the test. This means that the fraction of fines in the feed should not influence the test result significantly, if at all. For example, for a sample with 20% of 300 m material in the feed, if this is not scalped out of the fresh feed, then the mill charge, at 250% circulating load will contain 0.2/3.5 or 5.7% of 300 m in the mill charge compared with 0% for a scalped fresh feed, at a closing screen of 300 m. This should not have a great influence on the production of new fines unless the test was carried out in a wet environment and the fines contained a high percentage of clays to affect the viscosity of the grind environment. Thus for a Bond test (dry test), the difference between the scalped and unscalped BWi result is expected to be minor. In a plant operation where the environment is wet and clays are present, a different result may be observed.

Tests carried out to confirm this have clouded the water a little. Three rock types were tested with scalped and unscalped feeds with two samples showing higher BWi values for the scalped ore and the other sample showing a lower value [40].

In the work index test simulation, it is easy to change the closing screen size to examine the effect on the BWi. The results of such a simulation are shown in Figure3.12 where the simulated test was performed at different closing screen sizes and different scalping sizes. This shows that for scalping sizes at or below the closing screen size of the test, the BWi values are not affected. The scalping size of zero refers to the un-scalped mill feed. For scalped screen sizes above the closing screen size, the BWi values start to increase. The increase in BWi is more pronounced at the larger closing screen sizes. At a closing screen size of 300 m and a scalped size of 600 m, the increase in BWi is 4%.

Another outcome of the simulation is the effect of the closing screen size on the work index. As the closing size decreases, the ore must be ground finer, using more energy and producing a higher work index. Further simulations at even larger closing screen sizes show the BWi to increase. This dip in BWi with closing screen size has been observed experimentally, as shown in Figure3.13, with the minimum in BWi occurring at different closing screen sizes for different rock types [41,42].

Bond impact crushability work index (CWi) (Bond, 1963) results reported for iron ores vary from hard iron ore (17.7kWh/t) to medium hardness iron ore (11.3kWh/t) and friable iron ore (6.3kWh/t) (Table 2.11; Clout et al., 2007). The CWi for hard iron ores typically overlaps with those reported for BIF (taconite) iron ores while the range in values in Table 2.11 covers that for different types of iron ores and materials reported earlier by Bond (1963), with some relevant data in Table 2.12.

The most widely used parameter to measure ore hardness is the Bond work index Wi. Calculations involving Bonds work index are generally divided into steps with a different Wi determination for each size class. The low energy crushing work index laboratory test is conducted on ore specimens larger than 50mm, determining the crushing work index (WiC, CWi or IWi (impact work index)). The rod mill work index laboratory test is conducted by grinding an ore sample prepared to 80% passing 12.7mm ( inch, the original test being developed in imperial units) to a product size of approximately 1mm (in the original and still the standard, 14 mesh; see Chapter 4 for definition of mesh), thus determining the rod mill work index (WiR or RWi). The ball mill work index laboratory test is conducted by grinding an ore sample prepared to 100% passing 3.36mm (6 mesh) to product size in the range of 45-150m (325-100 mesh), thus determining the ball mill work index (WiB or BWi). The work index calculations across a narrow size range are conducted using the appropriate laboratory work index determination for the material size of interest, or by chaining individual work index calculations using multiple laboratory work index determinations across a wide range of particle size.

To give a sense of the magnitude, Table 5.1 lists Bond work indices for a selection of materials. For preliminary design purposes such reference data are of some guide but measured values are required at the more advanced design stage.

A major use of the Bond model is to select the size of tumbling mill for a given duty. (An example calculation is given in Chapter 7.) A variety of correction factors (EF) have been developed to adapt the Bond formula to situations not included in the original calibration set and to account for relative efficiency differences in certain comminution machines (Rowland, 1988). Most relevant are the EF4 factor for coarse feed and the EF5 factor for fine grinding that attempt to compensate for sizes ranges beyond the bulk of the original calibration data set (Bond, 1985).

The standard Bond tumbling mill tests are time-consuming, requiring locked-cycle testing. Smith and Lee (1968) used batch-type tests to arrive at the work index; however, the grindability of highly heterogeneous ores cannot be well reproduced by batch testing.

Berry and Bruce (1966) developed a comparative method of determining the hardness of an ore. The method requires the use of a reference ore of known work index. The reference ore is ground for a certain time (T) in a laboratory tumbling mill and an identical weight of the test ore is then ground for the same time. Since the power input to the mill is constant (P), the energy input (E=PT) is the same for both reference and test ore. If r is the reference ore and t the ore under test, then we can write from Bonds Eq. (5.4):

Work indices have been obtained from grindability tests on different sizes of several types of equipment, using identical feed materials (Lowrison, 1974). The values of work indices obtained are indications of the efficiencies of the machines. Thus, the equipment having the highest indices, and hence the largest energy consumers, are found to be jaw and gyratory crushers and tumbling mills; intermediate consumers are impact crushers and vibration mills, and roll crushers are the smallest consumers. The smallest consumers of energy are those machines that apply a steady, continuous, compressive stress on the material.

A class of comminution equipment that does not conform to the assumption that the particle size distributions of a feed and product stream are self-similar includes autogenous mills (AG), semi-autogenous (SAG) mills and high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). Modeling these machines with energy-based methods requires either recalibrating equations (in the case of the Bond series) or developing entirely new tests that are not confused by the non-standard particle size distributions.

Variability samples must be tested for the relevant metallurgical parameters. Ball mill design requires a Bond work index, BWi, for ball mills at the correct passing size; SAG mill design requires an appropriate SAG test, for example, SPI (Chapter 5). Flotation design needs a valid measure of kinetics for each sample, including the maximum attainable recovery and rate constants for each mineral (Chapter 12). Take care to avoid unnecessary testing for inappropriate parameters, saving the available funds for more variability samples rather than more tests on few samples. Remember that it must be possible to use the measured values for the samples to estimate the metallurgical parameters for the mine blocks in order to describe the ore body, and these estimates will be used in process models to forecast results for the plant. Always include some basic mineralogical examination of each sample.

The expression for computing the power consumption (P) derived theoretically by Rose and English [9] involved the knowledge of Bonds work index (Wi). To evaluate the work index they considered the maximum size in the feed and also the maximum size of particles in the discharge from the crusher. To determine the size through which 80% of the feed passed, they considered a large database relating the maximum particle size and the undersize. From the relation it was concluded that F80 was approximately equal to 0.7 times the largest size of particle. Taking the largest size of the particle that should be charged to a jaw crusher as 0.9 times the gape, F80 was written as

Also, to establish the P80 from the largest product size, Rose and English considered that the largest particle size discharged from the bottom of the crusher would occur at the maximum open set position and hence

For operating a jaw crusher it is necessary to know the maximum power required consistently with the reduction ratio and the gape and closed side settings. The maximum power drawn in a system will occur at the critical speed. Thus for maximum power, Q in Equation (4.51) is replaced with QM from Equation (4.19) to give

The largest size of ore pieces mined measured 560mm (average) and the smallest sizes averaged 160mm. The density of the ore was 2.8t/m3. The ore had to be crushed in a C-63 type jaw crusher 630 440. At a reduction ratio of 4, 18% of the ore was below the maximum size required. Determine:1.the maximum operating capacity of the crusher,2.the optimum speed at which it should be operated.

Finally, a look should be taken at coal elasticity, hardness and strength. However, a particular matter of importance which arises from those consideration is the ease of coal grinding, an important step in whatever coal preparation efforts for further processing. The more fundamental material properties are covered reasonably by Berkowitz (1994), so the discussion here will be limited to coal grindability. For that purpose, use is made of two different indices, both determined experimentally with the material to be ground. One is the Hardgrove grindability index and the other the Bond work index.

The Hardgrove index is determined using the ASTM method D 40971. It involves grinding 50g of the material, e.g. coal, of specified size (1630 mesh cut) in a specified ball-and-race mill for 60 revolutions. The amount of 200 mesh material is measured (w grams) and the index is defined as I = 13+ 6.93w. Thus, the higher the index, the easier is the grinding task. This method loosely assumes that the specific energy consumed is proportional to the new surface generated, following the concept of Rittingers law of comminution.

Berkowitz (1994 p.96) gives a generalized variation of the Hardgrove index with coal rank. According to the variation, anthracites are hard to grind, bituminous coals the easiest, and the subbituminous more difficult, with lignites down to the same low index level as anthracites. It is suggested that the decrease in the index below daf coal of 85% is caused by plastic deformation and aggregation of the softer coal particles, hence reducing the 200 mesh fraction generated by the grinding test.

The Bond work index (Bond, 1960) is based on Bonds law, which states that the energy consumed is proportional to the 1.5 power of particle size rather than the square of Rittingers law. Accordingly, the energy consumed in reducing the particle size from xF to xp (both measured as 80% undersize) is given by

We should note that the higher the value of the work index, the more difficult it is to grind the material. A compilation of data is available, for example, in Perrys Chemical Engineers Handbook (Perry et al., 1984). For coal, one average value is given, with Ei = 11.37 for = 1.63. Bonds law is useful because of the extensive comparative database.

Interestingly, Hukki (1961) offers a Solomonic settlement between the different grinding theories (rather than laws). A great deal of additional material related to grinding, or size reduction, comminution, is available in handbooks, e.g. by Prasher (1987) and research publications in journals such as Powder Technology. A very brief overview of grinding equipment is given in Section 1.5.3.

Rock fragmentation is a consequence of unstable extension of multiple cracks. Theoretically, rock fragmentation is also a facture mechanics problem. Two major differences between rock fracture and rock fragmentation are that (1) rock fragmentation deals with many cracks, but rock fracture deals with only one or a few, and (2) rock fragmentation concerns the size distribution of the fragments produced, but rock fracture does not. There are two important factors in rock fragmentation: (1) total energy consumed and (2) size distribution of fragments. In a study on crushing and grinding, fracture toughness has been taken as a key index similar to the Bond Work Index. Due to many cracks dealt with, rock fragmentation is a very complicated and difficult fracture problem. To achieve a good fragmentation, we need to know how the energy is distributed, which factors influence energy distribution, what is the size distribution, and so on. In practice such as mining and quarrying, it is of importance to predict and examine size distribution so as to make fragmentation optimized by modifying the blast plan or changing the fragmentation system. About size distribution, there are a number of distribution functions such as Weibulls distribution function [11], Cunninghams Kuz-Ram model [12], and the Swebrec function [13]. In engineering practice, how to develop a feasible and simple method to judge rock fragmentation in the field is still a challenging but significant job and will be in the future.

Although the fracture toughness of a rock is very important in rock fracture, the strengths of the rock are also useful in rock engineering. In the following we will see that the strengths and fracture toughness of a rock have a certain relation with each other, partly because of a similar mechanism in the micro-scale failure.

Bong's Work Index is used in Bong's law of comminution energy. It states that the total work useful in breakage is inversely proportional to the length of the formed crack tips and directly proportional to the square root of the formed surface:

where W is the specific energy expenditure in kilowatt-hours per ton and dp and df are the particle size in microns at which 80% of the corresponding product and feed passes through the sieve; CB is a constant depending on the characteristics of materials; and Sp and Sf are the specific surface areas of product and initial feed, respectively. Wi is called Bond's Work Index in kilowatt-hours per ton. It is given by the empirical equation:

where P1 is the sieve opening in microns for the grindability test, Gb.p. (g/rev) is the ball mill grindability, dp is the product particle size in microns (80% of product finer than size P1 passes) and df is the initial feed size in microns (80% of feed passes). A standard ball mill is 305mm in internal diameter and 305mm in internal length charged with 285 balls, as tabulated in Table 2.1. The lowest limit of the total mass of balls is 19.5Kg. The mill is rotated at 70 rev/min. The process is continued until the net mass of undersize produced by revolution becomes a constant Gb.p in the above equation.

To investigate the influence of the coal type on the stampability factor K, stamping tests with eight different coals (C1C8 in Table11.1) were carried out, using the Hardgrove grindability index (HGI) as a measure for the material dependency. The grindability is broadly defined as the response of a material to grinding effort. It can be interpreted as the resistance of the material against particularization. It is not an absolutely measurable physical property of the material. Generally, grindability can be determined either based on product constant fineness method (Bond work index Wi) or on constant useful grinding work method (HGI). The correlation between HGI and Wi can be described by the formula (11.5):

HGI is influenced by the petrographic composition of coal. HGI was developed to find a relationship between petrographic properties and strength of coal particles thus aiming to interpret the coking behavior of coals (Hardgrove 1932). HGI correlates to VM content, and the relationship is empirically specified for most of the hard coals and given with VM from 10% to 38% (db) by Eqs. (11.6) and (11.7):

For the execution of each test, further coal property parameters, particle size distribution and moisture content, as well as the height of fall of the stamp and the number of stamping steps were kept constant, so that the only parameter varied was the coal rank characterized by HGI.

The obtained data of each test was analyzed as described above to calculate the stampability factor K. A higher value for the HGI is equivalent to a lower resistance to stamping, i.e., a better stampability. The determined values of the stampability factor K are plotted against HGI in Fig.11.12.

wet grid ball mill

wet grid ball mill

Grid ball mill is widely used in smashing all kinds of ores and other materials, ore dressing and national economic departments like building and chemical industries etc. The size of ore shall not exceed 65mm and the best feed size is under 6mm. The effect in this job is better than coarse grinding. Grid ball mill consists of the shell, feeding part, discharging part, main bearing, lubricating system, driving system and other parts. There is wearing a liner inside the shell, and both ends of the shell are provided with a flange. The end cover of the mill is connected with the flange plate. The feeding part consists of the head, trunnion and feeding device. The discharge part includes the grid plate, head, and discharge trunnion.

Wet Grid ball mill is mainly used for mixing and grinding materials in two types: dry grinding and wet grinding .It has advantages of fineness uniformity and power saving. The machine uses different types of liner to meet different customer needs. The grinding fineness of material can be controlled by grinding time. The electro-hydraulic machine is auto-coupled and decompressed to reduce the starting current, and its structure is divided into integral type and independent type.

Compared with similar products,Wet Grid ball mill has the characteristics of low investment, low energy consumption, novel structure, simple operation, stable and reliable performance. It is suitable for mixing and grinding ordinary and special materials. The users can choose the right type, liner and medium type by considering the specific gravity, hardness, yield and other factors. The grinding medium is Wet Grid ball.

1.The ball mill is composed of a horizontal cylinder, a hollow shaft for feeding and discharging, and a grinding head. The main body is a long cylinder made of steel. The cylinder is provided with an abrasive body, and the steel lining plate is fixed to the cylinder body. The grinding body is generally a steel ball and is loaded into the cylinder according to different diameters and a certain proportion, and the grinding body can also be used with a steel section.

2.According to the particle size of the grinding material, the material is loaded into the cylinder by the hollow shaft of the wet grid ball mill feeding end. When the ball mill cylinder rotates, the grinding body acts on the cylinder liner due to the action of inertia and centrifugal force and friction. It is carried away by the cylinder. When it is brought to a certain height, it is thrown off due to its own gravity. The falling abrasive body crushes the material in the cylinder like a projectile.

3.The material is uniformly fed into the first chamber of the mill by the feeding device through the hollow shaft of the feeding material. The chamber has a step liner or a corrugated liner, and various steel balls are loaded therein. The rotation of the cylinder generates centrifugal force to bring the steel ball to a certain extent. The height drops and then hits and grinds the material. After the material reaches the rough grinding in the first bin, it enters the second bin through the single-layer partition plate. The bin is embedded with a flat liner with steel balls inside to further grind the material. The powder is discharged through the discharge raft to complete the grinding operation.

The main function of the steel ball in the ball mill is to impact crush the material and also play a certain grinding effect. Therefore, the purpose of grading steel balls is to meet the requirements of these two aspects. The quality of the crushing effect directly affects the grinding efficiency, and ultimately affects the output of the ball mill. Whether the crushing requirement can be achieved depends on whether the grading of the steel ball is reasonable, mainly including the size of the steel ball, the number of ball diameters, and the ball of various specifications. Proportion and so on.

The ball mill is composed of the main part such as a feeding part, a discharging part, a turning part, a transmission part (a reduction gear, a small transmission gear, a motor, and electric control). The hollow shaft is made of cast steel, the inner lining can be replaced, the rotary large gear is processed by casting hobbing, and the barrel is embedded with wear-resistant lining, which has good wear resistance. The machine runs smoothly and works reliably.

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