antimony mining minería

antimony: a mineral with a critical role in the green future

antimony: a mineral with a critical role in the green future

Yet, despite its lack of fanfare, it plays a significant role in our day-to-day lives. This graphic from Perpetua Resources provides an overview of antimonys key uses, and the critical role it plays in the movement towards clean energy, among other uses.

It has a variety of uses and is found in everything from household items to military-grade equipment. Because it conducts heat poorly, its used as a flame retardant in industrial uniforms, equipment, and even childrens clothing.

Its second most common use, according to USGS, is in transportation and batteries. Traditionally, antimony has been combined with lead to create a strong, corrosion-resistant metal alloy, which is particularly useful in lead-acid batteries.

Large-scale renewable energy storage has been a massive hurdle for the clean energy transition because its hard to consistently generate renewable power. For instance, wind and solar farms might have a surplus of energy on windy or sunny days, but can fall short when the weather isnt sunny, or when the wind stops.

Because of this, mass storage of renewable energy is key, in order to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy. Recent research points to liquid metal batteries as a potential storage solutionand these batteries heavily rely on antimony.

In the past, China has imposed restrictions on the exports of antimony-based products to the U.S., which reduced availability and increased prices. Because of this, antimony was identified as one of the 35 minerals that are critical to U.S. national security.

The only major antimony deposit in North America is located in the Stibnite-Yellow Pine Mining District of central Idaho. This site is the largest reserve in the nation and is expected to supply roughly 35% of U.S. antimony demand on average for the first six years of production.

In the near future, antimony demand could soar as a result of its critical role in clean energy storageand domestic production via the Stibnite-Yellow Pine Mining district could play a key role in meeting this rising demand.

Yet, while its future looks promising, the industry still some roadblocks to overcome. This graphic by RYAH MedTech looks at the key issues the plant-based medical industry is facing, and how big data can help solve them.

Plant-based treatmentssuch as medical cannabishave come a long way in recent years. However, inconsistencies in regulation and dosage are making it hard for the industry to reach its full potential.

Big data refers to large datasets that continually grow. These datasets are made up of information that is sourced from things like apps, devices, and online platforms. The need to leverage data in the plant-based medicine industry has resulted in an explosion of innovation.

RYAH MedTech collects massive amounts of patient data through devices such as smart inhalers, pens, and patches. These devices track, synthesize, and analyze patient information, which can help create a more personalized treatment plan tailored to the patient and their specific needs.

In addition to helping boost the patients experience, big data also has the potential to fill the knowledge gap within the plant-based medical industry and give physicians the information they need, which could boost its overall credibility.

But the industry needs to become more standardized before it can level up. This is why companies like RYAH MedTech are helping to close the gap in missing data, through a suite of IoT devices and software.

This infographic from Abaxx takes an introductory look at what commodity markets are, what drives revenue for commodity exchanges, and the need for a new set of contracts to deliver a more sustainable future.

From the simple gatherings of farmers to trade livestock to global contracts that trade the energy supplies of entire nations, commodity markets have evolved to deal with the changing demands of markets.

In the mid-19th century, commodity exchanges offered specialized contracts that resulted in less volume per exchange. The advent of the internet and digital platforms in the early 2000s increased the global reach of trading, increasing trading volumes.

While energy contracts dominate commodity exchanges, there are also metals and agricultural contracts that deliver the goods the world consumes. However, global economies take for granted the complex process that prices commodities, helping codify the terms of trade to facilitate a seemingly endless bounty of resources.

The activities of these market participants generate a consensus on price and establishes a benchmark for a particular commodity. It is the future contracts that codify the terms of trades and prices, creating trust and minimizing risk between producers and end-users.

In 2020, the four major commodity trading groups, ICE, CME, HKEX and SGX, generated $14 billion in revenue. While there are many types of contracts that cover the variety of commodities from metals to crops, typically only a handful of contracts account for the bulk of trading and revenue.

According to data compiled from the Futures Industry Association (FIA), in energy, metals and precious markets markets, the top 10 contracts account for 79.8%, 90.9% and 96% of the markets, respectively.

Markedly, this pattern makes contracts very valuable and a key driver of revenue for commodity exchanges. However, the commodity exchanges have yet to deliver specific contracts that can meet the demands for the specific materials and issues in the green energy transition.

The materials used to fuel economies are rapidly changing in order to create a more sustainable world. However, cleaner fuels such as LNG (liquified natural gas) do not have the history of established contracts and trust despite the rising demand.

The Abaxx Exchange is developing a LNG futures contract that will set the standard for this new market with new technology to better manage risks, execute trades, while embedding ESG concerns into global supply chains.

exports of the mining sector in mexico register ups and downs | opportimes

exports of the mining sector in mexico register ups and downs | opportimes

According to the Constitution and applicable Mexican laws, mining activities can only be carried out by the government or, alternatively, by Mexican natural or legal persons, if they are granted a government concession.

These foreign investment regulations promote the development of mining, since they allow: a broader exploration, the discovery of new sources of financing and a greater development of national technology.

In 2018, the mining sector continued its steady year-over-year trend of declining production, which was mainly due to the continued decline in oil and gas extraction in the fourth quarter of 2018, as well as a decrease in the mining-related services.

In the third quarter of 2019, the metallic and non-metallic minerals sectors continued to perform poorly. However, there was an upward trajectory in the industry attributable to the stabilization of the oil platform and the reactivation of services related to mining, due to increased investments in the maintenance and repair of existing wells and new drilling products.

Finally, the mining industry showed a greater recovery during the fourth quarter of 2019 associated with the reactivation of the platform and the improvement in the area of metallic and non-metallic minerals, despite a continuous fall in services related to mining.

mining in mexico captures us $ 490 million of fdi | opportimes

mining in mexico captures us $ 490 million of fdi | opportimes

In accordance with the Constitution and applicable Mexican laws, mining activities can only be carried out by the government or, alternatively, by Mexican individuals or legal entities, if they are granted a government concession.

These foreign investment regulations promote the development of the mining industry, since they allow: a broader exploration, the discovery of new sources of financing and a greater development of national technology.

myanmar antimony could be conflict mineral - mining journal

myanmar antimony could be conflict mineral - mining journal

Antimony production from Myanmar could be considered a conflict mineral under the US Dodd-Frank Act, Christopher Ecclestone, principal and mining strategist at Hallgarten & Co, said during a webinar hosted by Perpetua Resources.

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