brazil mining equipment production

brazil: mining, minerals and fuel resources

brazil: mining, minerals and fuel resources

Brazil, with a total population of 209.3 million as of 2017, is located in Eastern South America, adjoining the Atlantic Ocean. Brazil covers a total area of 8,514,877 km2 and is the fifth largest country in the world by landmass. The country has mostly tropical climates.

Brazil gained independence from the Portuguese in 1822 and has ever since focused on improving its agricultural and industrial growth. Today, the country is regarded as a leading economic power and regional leader in South America. Brazils growth in its mining sector has helped improve the countrys economy and make its presence felt in international markets.

Brazils continuous economic growth has resulted in the country being considered as a leading destination for foreign direct investment along with Russia, India, and China. As of 2017, Brazils GDP was valued at USD 2,055.51 billion, which represents a total of 3.32% of the worlds economy.

Brazil is currently home to 187 active mines, which generated a total of USD 31 billion worth of mineral exports in 2016. As the worlds largest producer of niobium, Brazil also ranks second in the world for the production of iron ore, manganese, tantalite, and bauxite.

Brazil produces 70 mineral commodities, including four fuels, 45 industrial minerals, and 21 metals. The countrys gold seems to be evenly divided among major producers like Yamana Gold, Kinross, and Anglo Gold Ashanti and also smaller companies like Jaguar and Eldorado Gold. As of December of 2018, Brazils gold production reported a total of 81,000 kilograms (kg).

The mineral production in Brazil reached 496,158,227.00 metric tons as of December 2017, which was a significant increase to that of 2016. This production increase was largely attributed to an increase in gold and silver production, as well as mineral extraction and manufacturing processes.

Brazils industrial minerals include gemstones, asbestos, and phosphate rock. Some of the most commonly mined gemstones and semi-precious stones in Brazil include diamonds, emeralds, and amethyst. One of the most notable regions of Brazil associated with producing gemstones is the city of Belo Horizone, which is well-known for its emerald, aquamarine, rubellite, green tourmaline, imperial topaz, alexandrite, and amazonite gem deposits.

Although Brazil has been considered a global leader in the production of asbestos for several decades, a 2017 Federal Supreme Court decision in this nation voted to ban the mining, processing, distribution, and marketing of asbestos as a result of its toxic health effects. This ban, despite causing a negative economic impact on the nation, shows the strength of Brazil to stand proudly in defense of the severe health risks associated with asbestos exposure. Brazils asbestos ban inspired several other nations, including Canada and Moldova, to also work towards fully banning the toxin in the near future.

Phosphate is a crucial ingredient in many agricultural fertilizers used around the world. Brazil, which is a global leader in agriculture, has traditionally imported more than 66% of its fertilizers from other nations, including the United States, Morocco, and Russia. As this agricultural industry continues to expand, an increased number of mining exploration projects has unveiled a greater number of phosphate reserves that can reduce the countrys demand for foreign fertilizer ingredients. Currently, Brazils largest phosphate producing companies include Anglo-America, MbAC Fertilizer, and DuSolo Fertilizers.

Brazil is one of the largest producers of iron ore in the world with a production estimate of about 1.5 million tons of iron ore exported each day as of January 2018. The national revenue of Brazil that is purely associated with iron ore exports amounts to a total of approximately USD 2.3 billion. Some of the most notable iron ore reserves in Brazil can be found in Barajas and Quadriltero Ferrifero, Vale remains the leading iron ore producing company in the country. The leading importers of Brazils iron ore are France, Japan, China, the Republic of Korea, and Germany.

As of 2017, Brazil ranked tenth in the world in terms of its aluminum production with a total of 800,000 tons produced that year. This was a reduction from the countrys aluminum production in recent years as a result of the reduced alumina refining capacity in Brazil.

After iron ore, Brazils next major export commodity is gold. In the first quarter of 2019, Brazil produced 67.4 tons of gold, which was an increase from the previous years quarter. In fact, between the years 2000 and 2019, the country achieved an average gold production of 48.72 tons per quarter. The major gold-producing states of Brazil include Para, Minas Gerais, and Bahia. The leading gold producing companies in the country are AngloGold Ashanti Minerao, Kinross Gold, Jaguar Mining, Yamana Gold, and Gold Digging.

Brazil has become increasingly involved in the global energy sector, especially under the current president, Jair Bolsonaros government. As the ninth-largest oil producer in the world, Brazil also ranks second in the world for the production of biofuels and hydropower. Furthermore, Brazil also ranks as the eighth-largest country by wind power installed capacity.

As the global trend continues to shift towards utilizing more renewable energy sources, Brazil has emerged as a leader in this area. For example, as of June 2018, 81.9% of Brazils total installed capacity of electricity generation was sourced from renewable sources. More specifically, 63.7% of the countrys total electricity generation is provided by hydropower sources, thereby making this the main energy source of Brazil. By the year 2030, Brazil aims to expand the use of its renewable energy sources, aside from hydropower, to encompass up to 33% of its total energy mix.

As of 2016, fossil fuels represented 55% of Brazils total energy supply. The primary fossil fuels used in the nations energy supply includes crude oil, natural gas, and coal products. Since 2011, Brazil has reduced its dependence on oil products from 40.3% to 38.4% as of 2016.

While Brazils total coal share makes up only 5% of its total energy mix, the country is estimated to be home to more than 3.24 thousand Mtoe recoverable coal reserves. In particular, sub-bituminous coal is the most prevalent form of coal found in the countrys states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, and Parana. The primary uses of Brazils mined coal can be found in its steel industry and power generation needs. There is little interest in using Brazils coal in other countries as a result of the high ash content and low carbon content associated with this nations mined coal.

Brazils mineral production in the future will largely depend on the discovery of new technologies and approaches that will enable sustainable and responsible mining without causing any harm to the environment. The country is trying to encourage foreign direct investment through joint ventures and the development of fresh projects with Vale, Petrobrs, and other companies.

Remarkable changes in the natural gas and crude oil markets in 2010 led to an increase in Brazils energy investment opportunities. To boost its economy, the Brazilian government eliminated price controls and import tariffs on petroleum and derivatives, thus drawing more private investments for the country.

To boost the countrys revenue and increase the states control over natural resources and energy, the Brazilian government has come up with a new mining code according to which the country will sell limited mineral rights to the highest bidder.

Disclaimer: The author of this article does not imply any investment recommendation and some content is speculative in nature. The Author is not affiliated in any way with any companies mentioned and all statistical information is publically available.

Will has a B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Durham, and a M.Sc. in Green Chemistry from the University of York. Naturally, Will is our resident Chemistry expert but, a love of science and the internet makes Will the all-rounder of the team. In his spare time Will likes to play the drums, cook and brew cider.

brazil arcelormittal

brazil arcelormittal

ArcelorMittals Brazil segment has production facilities in South America, including Brazil, Argentina, Costa Rica and Venezuela. The following table sets forth key items of information regarding ArcelorMittals principal production locations and production units in the Brazil segment:

mining

mining

We are the world's largest producer of iron ore and nickel, and we also operate in other mineral areas. With investments in technology and logistics, we guarantee the efficiency, growth, and sustainability of our operations.

We are the world's largest producer of iron ore and nickel, and we also operate in other mineral areas. With investments in technology and logistics, we guarantee the efficiency, growth, and sustainability of our operations.

Iron ore, an essential raw material for the manufacture of steel, is found in nature in rocks mixed with other elements. Through several cutting-edge industrial processes, the ore is processed to be sold to the steel industries. The iron ore produced by Vale can be found in the construction of houses, manufacture of cars, and production of household appliances.

Hard and malleable, nickel resists corrosion and maintains its physical and mechanical properties even under extreme temperatures. The high-grade nickel produced by Vale is greatly sought after for electroplating and battery applications.

Manganese, the fourth most used metal in the world, is an element of the composition of several items used in our daily lives, such as batteries, pots, and paint. The mineral is also essential for the manufacture of steel and ferroalloys, which are combinations of iron with one or more chemical elements.

Metallurgical coal is used in the manufacture of steel and is the focus of our operations and projects. And thermal coal, also produced by our operations, is used to generate heat and energy in thermal power plants.

Copper is one of the most important metals for the modern industry and, therefore, one of the businesses in which Vale operates. Its thermal energy conductive property surpasses that of any other commercially exploited metal. Malleable, recyclable, and resistant to corrosion and high temperatures, copper is used in the generation and transmission of energy, in wiring and almost all electronic equipment such as TVs and mobile phones.

mining in brazil - lexology

mining in brazil - lexology

The mining industry has significant relevance to the Brazilian economy, accounting for approximately 4.2 per cent of Brazilian GDP in 2016 (the most up-to-date official data available). Since 2006, mineral exploitation has increased, reaching its production peak in 2011 with approximately US$53 billion generated in proceeds from mining activities. In 2017, Brazilian production reached US$25 billion, and the difference in comparison with 2011 is primarily owing to the decrease in mineral commodities prices, particularly iron ore, which accounts for three-quarters of Brazilian mineral production.

Mining has also historically been an important sector of the Brazilian economy. In recent years, however, the sector has struggled owing to the expectation of a bill of law (5,807/2013) that rose from a government proposal to introduce new mineral regulations in Brazil in 2013, which caused many companies to delay their investment decisions until further clarity was obtained about the changes. However, macro- and microeconomic circumstances in recent years have resulted in a rise in investment opportunities for investors looking for mining assets, owing to fluctuations in the Brazilian currency that substantially increased the value of the US dollar in relation to the real.

The enactment of Law No. 13,575 on 26 December 2017 shows that the Brazilian government is aware that creating a transparent and independent regulatory agency for the mining sector (replacing the current National Mineral Production Department) is a step in the right direction to guarantee the legal certainty and clarity required for the attraction of the investments necessary to reboot the mining industrys job-generation capacity and development.

Considering Brazils extensive territory it holds a great geological diversity of metallic and non-metallic minerals, including some that have gained global relevance owing to recent technological breakthroughs (eg, lithium niobium and tantalite) and whose size of mineral reserves stands out. However, the target minerals, as per the amount exported by Brazil in 2015 and 2016, are iron ore, bauxite, aluminium, niobium, copper, manganese, kaolin, gold and others. Rare-earth reserves have been actively prospected in Brazil, and if some projects in south-east Brazil become viable this will certainly increase the general interest in these minerals in Brazil.

The most active mineral regions in Brazil are in the states of Minas Gerais (reserves of gems, iron ore, gold, manganese, aluminium, graphite, bauxite, rare earths and niobium), Mato Grosso (reserves of manganese and iron), Par (reserves of gold, iron ore, aluminium, copper, nickel and manganese), Bahia (reserves of bauxite, iron, nickel and chrome) and Rondnia (reserves of tin, gold, manganese and diamonds). There are mineral activities in other Brazilian states as well, but they are not so mature.

The Brazilian system is civil law-based. The Federal Constitution, enacted on 1988, organises the country as a federal republic formed by the union of the states and municipalities, and the Federal District (Braslia). Each of the 27 states of the union is empowered to adopt its own constitution and laws observing the principles and provisions stated in the Federal Constitution.

The National Mining Agency (ANM) is the federal agency entitled to regulate mining activities in Brazil. The main legislation regulating mining activities in Brazil is Decree Law No. 227/1967, the Brazilian Mining Code and Law No. 13,575/2017. Although primarily regulated by the Federal Constitution and federal laws, mining activities are also subject to state and municipal laws, particularly on taxes, environmental and soil usage matters.

The Federal Constitution and mining laws at federal level regulate, primarily, the mining industry in the country, along with other state and local regulations in relation to taxes, environmental licensing and soil usage matters.

The Brazilian Mining Code (Decree No. 227/1967) grants authority to the Ministry of Mines and Energy and the environmental protection authorities, especially the Brazilian Environmental and Renewable Resources Institute (IBAMA) and the state environmental agencies, which, along with the ANM, are the main regulatory bodies supervising mining activities.

The legislative branch has powers to enact all the laws that are relevant to the mining industry. Nevertheless, the ANM (formerly known as the National Department of Mineral Production - DNPM), has powers to issue regulations to set the operational guidelines of the Brazilian mining industry. Regulations issued by the ANM must stay within the general competence attributed to that body under applicable law. In this sense, ANM as a regulatory agency, has powers to inspect, regulate and sanction the industry players, within the limits of the powers granted to it by federal laws.

For many years now a new mining code has been expected. However, no major amendment was passed last year, except the enactment of Law No. 13,575/2017, which resulted in the creation of the ANM to replace the DNPM.

There is no classification system for reporting mineral resources and mineral reserves set in Brazil by the ANM. There is no distinction between resources and reserves, as in other jurisdictions, and Brazilian mining legislation only establishes standards for determining different levels of certainty on the existence of a deposit, such as in measured reserve, indicated reserve and inferred reserve.

In this sense, a measured reserve is the tonnage or volume of ore calculated by the dimensions verified in surface geological mapping, underground trenches, galleries, underground work and drilling, and in which the amount is determined by the results of detailed sampling. The inspection, sampling and measurement must be as thorough as possible and the geological characteristics well defined to ensure that the geological features (dimension, form and grade of the deposit) can be accurately determined. The tonnage and grade must be rigorously defined within the limits established with a margin of error of no more than 20 per cent.

An indicated reserve is the tonnage and grade of ore partially measured based on specific samples or production data and partially by estimates based on geological evidence at a reasonable distance from the actual sampling. Finally, an inferred reserve is an estimate made based on the knowledge of the geological characteristics of the mineral deposit, with little or no exploration work carried out.

To what extent does the state control mining rights in your jurisdiction? Can those rights be granted to private parties and to what extent will they have title to minerals in the ground? Are there large areas where the mining rights are held privately or which belong to the owner of the surface rights? Is there a separate legal regime or process for third parties to obtain mining rights in those areas?

The Federal Constitution determines under article 20, item IX, that the Union (ie, the Brazilian federal state) has ownership over all mineral resources on the ground, including metallic minerals. Private parties obtain the right to explore the minerals through the granting of an authorisation by the federal government represented by the ANM. The exploitation rights over any minerals, however, are granted through a concession issued by the Ministry of Mines and Energy.

There is no entailment of ownership or possession rights in connection with the mining rights for the land underlying the mining rights. However, the mineral rights holders shall have access to and use of the areas to be explored and exploited, and rights of way and easement over private and public lands. Should the surface rights belong to a third party, they may be acquired by mutual agreements between the mining company and the surface rights holders. If surface rights are not acquired by the mining companies, their holder shall be entitled in any event to a compensation fee for the occupation of the area, and an indemnification for any damages caused to the land, as further explained in question 10.

What information and data are publicly available to private parties that wish to engage in exploration and other mining activities? Is there an agency which collects mineral assessment reports from private parties? Must private parties file mineral assessment reports? Does the agency or the government conduct geoscience surveys, which become part of the database? Is the database available online?

Mining investors and new players interested in engaging in exploration and other mining activities in Brazil may obtain general information related to the area, statistics on mining activities and general technical information through the ANMs website. The ANM provides preliminary publicly held information on existing exploration licences and mining concessions, geographic coordinates of mining titles and information on titleholders. However, mineral assessment reports are not publicly released to third parties even though holders of exploration licences must file it with the ANM.

The Brazilian Geological Survey Company (CPRM), a government-held company subordinated to the Ministry of Mines and Energy, carries out regularly geological studies and evaluation of the Brazilian natural resources. Because of that, the CPRM accumulated geological and georeferenced information and construed a comprehensive database of documents, charts, maps and images. The CPRMs website contains studies, surveys and mineral evaluations that are openly available to the general public.

What mining rights may private parties acquire? How are these acquired? What obligations does the rights holder have? If exploration or reconnaissance licences are granted, does such tenure give the holder an automatic or preferential right to acquire a mining licence? What are the requirements to convert to a mining licence?

Private parties may acquire two main types of mining rights in Brazil: exploration licences and mining concessions. Exploration licences work on a first-come, first-served basis, providing the licence holders with the right to access the properties and execute exploration activities, having previously executed an agreement with the surface owner, as the case may be.

Exploration licences can be granted for a period of one to three years, being its extension permitted upon its request by the titleholder to the ANM and its respective authorisation, for an equal period. The exploration licence represents a preliminary stage upon which the licensee must carry out the exploration work and, if successful, submit the supporting evidence of such success to the ANM on the existence of mineral reserves in the licence area.

Upon the analysis and approval of the exploration report by the ANM, the licence holder may apply for the mining concession within the term of one year. Additionally, the individuals or companies holding exploration licences must comply with the following conditions, among others, in order to obtain the mining concessions:

On the other hand, the mining concessions may be granted to companies or individuals in relation to specific types of mineral deposits in the concession area, being valid until total depletion of such mineral deposits. Should the concessionaire find any other types of mineral in the concession area it is required to notify the ANM of such finding and, upon its request to the DNPM, may include the other mining rights in its mining concession.

As provided in the Brazilian Mining Code, the request to obtain a mining concession is made to the Ministry of Mines and Energy, containing the detailed geological and geophysical information on the licence areas under request, and including:

Mining concessions are granted for an indefinite period of time and, therefore, are not subject to renewal. All provisions related to the renewal of the exploration licence are listed on the answer to question 10. Additionally, applications for mining rights are also not transferable in Brazil.

The applicable law authorises the free transfer of mineral licences subject to the ANMs approval. The assignment of mining licences or concessions requires that any interested individual or company comply with the requirements laid down in the law and in the applicable ANM regulations for the purposes of completing the transfer.

The transfer of interests in mining companies, the tangible or intangible assets of the mining operation and product sale contracts do not require the ANMs prior authorisation. However, the execution of a security interest upon these assets may compromise the development of the mining concession in itself. Furthermore, the transfer of interests in mining companies will be subject to the ANMs prior authorisation in case the mining rights are located within an area of 150km of Brazils borders.

Both the application for mining rights and the mining licence are valid, each one, individually, for a period of one to three years, and may be renewed for an equal period upon authorisation from the ANM. Mining concessions are granted for an indefinite period of time and, therefore, are not subject to renewal.

Non-compliance by the licence holder or mining concessionaire of the obligations provided in the regulation may result in sanctions that will range from warnings, fines or forfeiture of said mining licence or mining concession. In addition, if verified by the ANM, the following infractions will result in the forfeiture of the application for mining rights, mining licence or mining concession:

Further, the ANM may declare void all mining licences or mining concessions when these are granted or issued in disagreement with the provisions of the Brazilian Mining Code. This annulment will be promoted ex officio on the following cases: intentional imprecision on the definition of the exploration or exploitation areas; and when transfers or assignments of mining licences or mining concessions are in noncompliance with the legal and regulatory requirements, including its approval by the ANM of said transfer or assignment.

The Brazilian Mining Code determines that only domestic individuals or companies may apply for or acquire mining rights in Brazil. This does not restrict, however, foreign companies or individuals to hold total ownership of Brazilian entities active in the mining sector, as long as the company applying for or acquiring a mining right is duly incorporated and headquartered in Brazil.

This rule is excepted only by mining rights located within an area of the country called the border zone, which is defined as the area within 150km from the dry borders of the country. Any mining companies holding mining rights or willing to carry out exploration or exploitation activities in the border zone must be controlled and managed predominantly by Brazilians. Thus, mining rights located in the border zone may not be acquired by foreigners nor by a Brazilian company controlled by foreign parties.

Brazil has an independent judicial system under which the ruling of courts and domestic arbitration awards can be enforced against any party in any part of the Brazilian territory. Its judicial system is organised under the rule of law and based on constitutional principles such as due process of law and full defence. The rule of law and due process are also followed by the authorities on the administrative level, as provided in the applicable legislation. Intermediary administrative decisions can be challenged or appealed before a superior court, and a final decision of the administration can be challenged with the competent judicial courts.

As mentioned above, domestic arbitration awards are freely enforceable in Brazil, however, foreign arbitration awards require prior ratification by the superior courts, whereby it is confirmed that the validity of the arbitration procedure and the due process of law were followed. This ratification does not modify the awards decision.

The Brazilian Constitution provides that there is no entailment of ownership or possession rights with the mining rights for the land underlying them (the mining rights), which belongs to the federal government. The mineral right holders have access and use to the areas to be explored and exploited, and rights of way and easement over private and public lands. Should the surface rights belong to a third party, they may be acquired by mutual agreement entered into by the mining company with the surface rights holders upon the determination of a compensation fee for the occupation of the area and indemnification for the damages caused to the land.

Should the mineral rights holder and the surface rights holder not be able to reach an amicable understanding, the miner may resort to legal action with the local courts to establish the compensation fee that shall be paid to the surface rights holder. This compensation must be paid to the surface rights holder because of the occupation of the area and any damages that may be caused to the property by the execution of the mining activities therein. Courts generally grant reasonable market prices.

In addition, the federal government has some limitations on the acquisition and lease of rural lands in Brazil by foreign individuals and legal entities with foreign control. These limitations, however, have to be analysed on a case-by-case basis depending on the size of the land, since they could require prior approval by the government.

The Brazilian Forestry Code designates as a protected area (known as legal reserves) 20 per cent of every rural property in Brazilian territory. The exceptions to this rule are for properties located in the Cerrado or in the Amazon Forest regions, in which the legal reserve is extended to 35 per cent and 80 per cent, respectively. In both cases, these legal reserves must be demarcated and registered by the landowner with the Real Estate Registry. In this sense, the law also determines requirements that must be met: the legal reserve must be duly forested or under a reforestation plan, with native vegetation that cannot be used for developing industrial activities. The reforested vegetation cannot be cut down within the legal reserve if the company wants to change the location of the reserve, except if previously authorised by the local environmental protection agency. If the regeneration is being carried out in areas of the Atlantic forest, the cutting down of vegetation may be a prohibitive obstacle to the environmental licensing.

Should the property contain caves or archaeological sites these must be mapped and a study prepared to assess their relevance, and then submitted to the environmental protection agency. The environmental protection agency shall decide on the preservation or not of the caves or archeological sites, as well as if a compensation for these areas will be necessary, upon the analysis of the assessment studies.

The national conservation units system is regulated by Law No. 9,985/2000, which consists of an area so declared by the government with important environmental features and resources with the purpose of conversation and sustainable development. Conservation units are classified into two types: full protection or sustainable use. Full protection conservation units have the purpose of preserving nature, allowing only the indirect use of its natural resources. On the other hand, sustainable use conservation units have to make nature conservation compatible with the sustainable use of part of the natural resources.

Also, ANM may establish that certain areas are off-limits for mining activities because of strategic interest, for instance, if certain areas are necessary for the development of infrastructure projects and it is established that mining activities conducted in that area may impact the projects. All off-limits areas are indicated on the ANMs system and can be identified by parties interested in applying for mining rights.

These taxes, duties and contributions are required to be paid in different moments during the development of the mining activity, depending on the stage of the exploration works or during the entire period of the concession, and all payments have to be made in kind and in Brazilian currency.

A fee owed for purposes of occupation and use of the area, under which all exploration targets are subject to the TAH. Currently the annual fee corresponds to 3.42 reais per hectare covered by a licence for mining exploration, increasing to 5.1 reais per hectare, upon the extension of the licences term.

This is a royalty payment serving the purpose of compensating the states and municipalities for the economic use of the mineral resources in their territory, similar to a tax. It is owed by the legal entities that exploit or extract mineral resources, payable upon sale of the mining product from the mine or other mining deposit or beneficiation of the mining product or its consumption by the mining entity. It varies as a percentage of the net revenue from the sale of mineral products, depending on its type. In general, the rates vary from 0.2 per cent to 3 per cent depending on the kind of mineral product. Upon the calculation of CFEM, transport, sales, tax and insurance costs are deducted.

Brazilian mining law provides that the surface rights holder of the location of the mine has the right to a statutory royalty equivalent to one half of the CFEM (which is calculated as mentioned above).

It is a tax imposed on mining activities in the states of Par, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso and Amap, levied at amounts of up to approximately US$3 per tonne or exploited ore, payable to the state where the ore is exploited. Some of the mining companies and mining associations are challenging the legality of these state laws in view of the Federal Constitution.

This is the corporate income tax, of which the basic rate calculation is 15 per cent based on yearly or quarterly adjusted actual profits. When the taxable income exceeds 240,000 reais yearly or 60,000 reais quarterly, an additional 10 per cent rate is added to the standard 15 per cent rate.

Heavy mining equipment brought to Brazil may benefit from tax incentives or full exemption; nevertheless, all products imported are subject to import duty that shall be levied on the customs value of such product, pursuant to GATT rules and calculated on the cost insurance and freight value. This duty rate is selective and will depend on the products tariff classification.

PIS and COFINS are social contribution taxes levied at different percentages on the companys gross revenues. There are two applicable regimes: cumulative - rates of 3 per cent and 0.65 per cent, respectively, without any generation or use of credits; or non-cumulative - rates of 7.6 per cent and 1.65 per cent, respectively, with generation of credits in the acquisition of goods or services that can be offset with debts of the same contributions. Such contributions are also levied on the importation of services (with rates of 7.6 per cent and 1.65 per cent) and goods (with rates of 2.1 per cent and 9.65 per cent).

This is levied on the distribution of goods, intercity and interstate transportation and communication services. It is payable during all stages of the products sale not only by the producer, but also by the consumer.

In general, there is a levy of rural land tax (ITR) for mining activities, for which the triggering event is the property, usage and possession of real estate located outside the urban area, and its calculation depends on the value of the property alone, without taking into consideration any improvements.

This is a tax imposed on any kind of services performed by companies or self-employed professionals, with a maximum rate of 5 per cent, its assessment being based on the price of each services and also assessed on services provided by non-residents to Brazilian residents (import of services).

This is a tax assessed on certain credit transactions (including loans) and currency exchange transactions, among other financial transactions, being levied at rates that varies according to the nature of the transaction.

Certain taxes and contributions payable by the Brazilian companies in benefit of their employees, depending on the total value of their remuneration, such as social security contributions and severance funds. These taxes and contributions may increase payroll costs by roughly 28 per cent to 35 per cent of gross wages.

Brazilian authorities have the prerogative of granting tax benefits and incentives to private parties executing mining activities. The main incentive programmes available in Brazil at federal level are:

Additionally, at state level, the most common tax benefits are related to state tax exemptions (ICMS, ie, state VAT), deferral, assumed credits and suspension or reduction of the assessment basis. State governments also hold the prerogative of granting incentives to mining operations either through a reduction in the taxable base of the ICMS of through deferral.

There is no transfer tax imposed on the transfer of licences. However, there are taxes on capital gains that shall be levied as a withholding tax over the positive difference between the total investment made in connection with a mining licence and the amount obtained with the sale of said licence to any third party. The withholding income tax over capital gains is based on a progressive rate (the rates vary according to the amount of the capital gain, within the range of 15-22.5 per cent).

There are several types of contractual frameworks that may be used for the purposes of developing a mineral project in Brazil. Investors may operate through stand-alone vehicles (ie, incorporated entities) or in association with one or more foreign or local partners. Those arrangements are typically set up through joint ventures, partnerships, risk-sharing agreements or option agreements.

Taking into consideration that only local companies incorporated and headquartered in Brazil are authorised to hold mining rights, the incorporation of a local subsidiary is necessary for the purposes of any stand-alone initiatives. In this sense, limited liability companies (LLCs) are usually the preferred vehicles for holding mining rights and carrying out exploration initiatives. In Brazil, LLCs must have at least two stakeholders, which can be either legal entities or individuals holding the company shares and executing the companys articles of incorporation. In an LLC each stakeholder is responsible for the payment in full of its equity in the companys capital stock, although all stakeholders are jointly and severally liable for any amounts of capital not fully paid-in. Recently a specific type of LLC was introduced (EIRELI) where its incorporation may take place with only one stakeholder. In contrast to a standard LLC, in an EIRELI certain requirements of minimum capital shall apply.

Another option is to incorporate a more complex, sophisticated and costly type of legal entity, very similar to a corporation, typically called an SA. The capital stock of an SA is divided into shares, and the company is allowed to raise capital through public or private subscriptions. Similarly, the shareholders of an SA are liable solely for the value of the shares purchased or subscribed for. SAs are authorised to increase capital stock and raise funding through public offers at local markets if they are duly registered with the Brazilian Exchange Commission. In this case, their shares may be traded on the local stock exchange or on the over-the-counter market. SAs not listed on the stock exchange are authorised to sell their shares only through private trading. The management consists of a board of directors or a board of officers, where the board of directors must have at least three members and the board of officers is required to have at least two members.

Only local companies incorporated and headquartered in Brazil are authorised to hold mining rights. However, those local companies can be held by non-Brazilian entities. The only exception to non-Brazilian ownership is when mining activities are carried out at the border zone (as defined in question 48) since any companies developing mining activities in the border zone must be controlled and managed predominantly by Brazilian individuals.

Are there jurisdictions with favourable bilateral investment treaties or tax treaties with your jurisdiction through which foreign entities will commonly structure their operations in your jurisdiction?

In 2014, the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs developed a new model for bilateral cooperation and investments treaties. Several of those treaties were executed by the Brazilian federal government over the past two decades, but none has been ratified by the Brazilian National Congress to date.

Brazil is signatory of double taxation avoidance treaties with 33 different countries, namely: Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Slovakia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine and Venezuela. These treaties, in general, provide tax relief in the form of reduction or elimination of taxes withheld on dividends, royalties and interest payments remitted abroad. In addition, corporate taxes paid in other countries through foreign subsidiaries operating in Brazil may be used to offset income tax paid in Brazil.

In addition, Brazil is a founding member of MERCOSUL, which is also known as the Southern Cone Common Market, and the purpose of the MERCOSUL treaty is to promote, along with the other members, the free movement of goods, services, people and currency, with the adoption of a Common Standard Rate (TEC) and a common regional commercial policy. The countries that are part of MERCOSUL are Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela (currently suspended for non-compliance with political requirements). Associate members are Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru and Suriname.

Considering that in Brazil interest rates are among the highest in the world, using local banking system is not an effective option unless funding can be obtained with the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES) through some of its subsidised credit lines. Also, the So Paulo Stock Exchange does not have a history of fund-raising for greenfield projects. In fact, there are only a couple of mining companies today listed on the So Paulo Stock Exchange.

Having said that, typically funding for non-major mining companies in Brazil is obtained through the international capital markets or international financing markets. For example, the Toronto Stock Exchange in Canada is a major hub for companies raising funds to invest in mining projects in Brazil.

The BNDES through its subsidiary Bradespar and some of the major pension funds in Brazil through private equity funds do provide direct financing to mining projects. However, owing to their financing policy the projects considered for investment are normally large projects and nowadays non-greenfield.

Mining companies holding a mining concession are allowed to encumber their rights in accordance with the Mining Code. However, any liens (such as pledges, leases, etc) to these concessions have to be registered with the ANM for purposes of validity and enforcement. Taking security over exploration permits and other kinds of applications are currently not allowed.

No restrictions or limitations are imposed on the importation of machinery and equipment or services required in connection with exploration and extraction activities. However, in Brazil heavy taxes are applicable to the importation of goods and services in general (ie, not only those related to mining activities), which may end up acting as practical restrictions on its importation.

There are no standard agreements when it comes to contracting suppliers in Brazil. There are certain contractual principles in Brazil that cannot be ignored by the parties when entering into a contract. The Brazilian Civil Code provides for mechanisms to avoid unbalanced contractual obligations. As a matter of fact, a contract perceived to be unfriendly to a party could be argued as null under Brazilian law.

In the past decade there was an increase in Brazil in the use of alternative dispute resolution methods, those being through arbitration, based in Law No. 9,307/1996, or through mediation, which is a far newer concept established relatively recently by Law No. 13,140/2015. When it comes to arbitration, this kind of alternative dispute resolution mechanism has been successfully and commonly used in Brazil also in equipment supply agreements. However, considering the costs associated with an arbitration there are certain types of equipment supply agreements where such dispute resolution method although efficient may not be recommendable.

No restrictions or limitations are imposed on the processing, export or sale of metallic minerals, and they can be freely processed or sold domestically or outside of Brazil. There are no export quotas, licensing or other mechanisms to limit the mining productions exportation. Manufactured products on the other hand may enjoy some tax benefits and incentives for purposes of exportation.

Brazilian legislation currently does not impose limitations on the import of funds or use of the proceeds from the export or sale of metallic minerals. Thus, all of the export transactions proceeds may be kept abroad, what is usually useful in pre-export financing. All foreign-exchange transactions are carried out through authorised local commercial banks with the participation of a registered broker at the commercial exchange rate, except for certain transactions that are authorised at the tourist exchange rate. Access to foreign exchange can be obtained through those local authorised commercial banks and are in no way tied to export performance.

The Brazilian Constitution provides that the federal union, the states and municipalities are all entitled to supervise compliance with environmental laws and impose administrative sanctions such as fines, interdictions or restrictions on activities.

Each state has its own environmental agency, that along with IBAMA (the federal environmental agency covering interstate projects or activities with high potential for environmental impact) are the main governmental bodies responsible for environmental licensing of mining activities. There is no environmental code compiling all environmental laws, which are laid down through numerous federal, state, and municipal regulations. However, the main environmental related principles and rules are stated in the Brazilian Federal Constitution, the Forestry Code, Federal Laws Nos. 6,938/1981, 7,805/1989 and 9,605/1998. Decrees Nos. 97,632/1989, 6,514/2008 and 9,406/2018 and regulations from the Environmental National Council (CONAMA).

With the purposes of assessing and preventing potential risks to the environment the licensing process in Brazil is typically conducted by the state environmental agency where the mining project is located, and is divided into three stages: grant of the preliminary licence, grant of the installation licence, and, finally, grant of the operation licence.

Before starting any project constructing stage, mining companies must apply and obtain a preliminary licence upon submitting an environmental impact study report (EIA/RIMA) to the respective environmental agency. After the environmental control, reclamation and decommissioning plans have been approved by the environmental agency the mining company will be able to apply for the installation licence, prior to the commencement of construction. Finally, actual mining activities can only take place after the issuance of the operation licence, which presupposes the implementation of the requirements indicated in the environmental control plan.

Mining companies have to submit studies to the environmental authorities related to the mitigation and compensation measures to obtain its installation licence. These studies must address the reclamation and decommissioning of the mined areas, containing the measures to be implemented throughout the mining process and at its end in order to prevent severe degradation of the area and to minimise impact on the environment.

The decommissioning plan for the project must also be filed with the ANM for purposes of evaluation and determination of further measures and requirements in relation to the efficiency and safety of the mining activities as well.

Federal Law No. 12,334/2010, DNPM Ordinance No. 70,389/2017, and Resolutions No. 143/2012 and No. 144/2012 enacted by the National Council of Water Resources provide the main regulatory framework for construction of tailing and waste dams. Tailing and waste dams require a prior dam safety plan, which shall be composed of:

The person in charge of the dam safety plan must be the engineer registered with the Regional Council of Engineering, Architecture and Agronomy as the one technically responsible for implementing the plan in all of its aspects.

Revision of said dam safety plan may vary from three to seven years, depending on how the dam is classified in terms of potential risks. Also, revisions shall occur whenever there are any structural changes or amendments in the classification of the tailings or waste deposited in the dam. The team executing said revision shall be multidisciplinary. Regular inspections also have to be executed by the mining company at least every 15 days.

Finally, mining companies are liable for identifying and declaring emergency situations, and take all actions described in the applicable dam safety plan, especially with regard to the local population of potentially affected zones, local public authorities, environmental authorities and the ANM.

The Ministry of Labour and ANM are the main bodies responsible for issuing health, safety and labour laws applicable to the mining industry. Regulatory Norm No. 22 of the Ministry of Labour and Employment provides the mainly work, health and safety rules on the mining industry. Furthermore, DNPM Ordinance No. 237/2001 enacted the Mining Regulations, which under item 22 also provide the work, health and safety rules that should be observed by mining companies. These rules determine standards for work procedures and safety conditions, emergency operations and personnel training, among others.

Additionally, the Consolidation of Labour Laws, which is equivalent to a labour law code, regulates work health and safety programmes that must be observed by all companies, including mining companies, covering the occupational health control programme, prevention programme for environmental risks, in-house commission for prevention of accidents in mining activities and risk-management programme, among others.

DNPM Normative Opinion No. 46/2012 determines that, while the waste products of mining areas have no economic value, they shall not be assets of the union nor the mining company. Therefore, mineral substances that may exist in the tailings or waste are subject to the same legal treatment as of in situ minerals (ie, not exploited). This means that to enjoy any economic benefit from products wasted or in tailings, a mining company depends on the existence of a specific licence.

In order to work in Brazil, foreign employees must obtain work or residence visas. The law provides that two-thirds of a Brazilian companys employees must be Brazilian citizens, and two-thirds of its payroll must be reserved to pay Brazilian employees. Exceptions are only allowed to individuals from member countries from MERCOSUL, also known as the Southern Cone Common Market, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay. Those limitations are valid for any kind of activity in Brazil and not only for mining activities.

Further, for each US$200,000 invested in a Brazilian company a permanent visa can be obtained for a foreigner to occupy a managerial position (ie, be an officer) in such Brazilian company. Said amount may be reduced if a certain number of jobs are created in Brazil within a certain period of time.

There are no specific corporate social responsibility laws or obligations applicable to the mining industry. In terms of community engagement or CSR, the mining industry in Brazil is subject to the same general environmental laws and regulations applicable to other kinds of activities with environmental impact, as described in question 34. The Brazilian environmental agency (IBAMA) is the principal federal regulatory body for administering those laws and regulations, including licensing and enforcement.

Brazilian legislation does not authorise mining activities in areas reserved for indigenous populations. Specific laws determine which areas are indigenous. The Federal Constitution also determines that any mining activity in indigenous areas require prior approval of the Brazilian National Congress, and that the indigenous communities have the right to receive royalties from the exploitation of any deposits located in their lands. Nevertheless, these specific provisions related to the payment of royalties have to be regulated by the Brazilian Congress prior to its implementation.

In Brazil there is also another type of traditional community known as the Quilombolas, which is composed of the descendants of slaves who escaped from slave owners before the abolition of slavery in 1888. The Federal Constitution provides that Quilombolas are in essence entitled to obtain title deeds and the ultimate ownership of the land they occupy. Mining activities in these areas, although not prohibited, will engender payment of compensation rights by mining companies to those local communities in order to operate.

In sum, mining rights in Brazil cannot exist on indigenous land. On Quilombolas lands they can. However, to carry out mining activities under those rights, mining companies must deal with local communities and agree on the compensation to be borne by the mining company.

The enactment of Decree No. 5,051/2004 obliges Brazil to apply the International Labour Organization Convention (ILO) No. 169, dated 27 June 1989, also known as the ILO Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, that references the rights of ownership and possession over lands occupied by an indigenous population and the natural resources pertaining to the land. Pursuant to the Convention, previous consultation shall be made to the indigenous people concerned in order to determine whether the interests of these traditional communities would be impaired or not, and to what extent. The people concerned should participate whenever possible in the benefits that the mining activities, and receive equitable compensation for any damages they may suffer as a result of these activities.

Federal Law No. 12,846/2013 provides on the administrative and civil liability of legal entities for the practice of acts against the public administration at national or foreign level, among other matters. Although still in the earlier stages of enforcement, the successive corruption scandals and the ongoing investigations hatching all over the country caused companies to look seriously into this legislation and increase internal controls and put in place effective compliance systems as ways to reduce and limit exposure for their business, management and stakeholders in general.

With several Brazilian companies doing business abroad and seeking public and private finance in the US, the UK and Europe, the attention of Brazilian companies has shifted in recent years from an isolated internal Brazilian view to a much broader one seeking to understand and assess exposure under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and the UK Bribery Act, for instance. Also, the enactment of Federal Law No. 12,846/2013, described in question 45, and the increasing enforcement abroad against Brazilian companies of foreign anti-corruption regulations, have also contributed to forcing Brazilian companies to pay closer attention to foreign legislation governing anti-bribery and foreign corrupt practices, especially the FCPA.

Has your jurisdiction enacted legislation or adopted international best practices regarding disclosure of payments by resource companies to government entities in accordance with the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Standard?

Brazil is a founding member of MERCOSUL, which is also known as the Southern Cone Common Market, and the purpose of the MERCOSUL treaty is to promote, along with the other members, the free movement of goods, services, people and currency, with the adoption of the TEC and a common regional commercial policy. The countries that are part of MERCOSUL are Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela (currently suspended for non-compliance with political requirements). Associate members are Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru and Suriname. A company incorporated under Brazilian law could benefit for the MERCOSUL treaty, although there are no specific benefits in the MERCOSUL treaty in relation to mining activities.

What were the biggest mining news events over the past year in your jurisdiction and what were the implications? What are the current trends and developments in 2019 in your jurisdiction's mining industry (legislation, major cases, significant transactions)?

The biggest news was the enactment of Law No. 23,291 on 25 February 2019 by the State of Minas Gerais, which established the State Policy for Dam Safety. The law stipulates that the accretion, final or temporary disposal of tailings and industrial or mining wastes by means of dams of any kind must be avoided whenever there is a better technique available. For a new dam to be authorised, the EIA must prove that there are no other viable techniques, such as dry stacking. In the event of a disaster arising from non-compliance with the provisions set forth in the law, the administrative fine may be increased by up to 1,000 times. Pursuant to the law, the environmental licensing for dams shall be conditioned to the presentation of environmental bond, with the purpose of ensuring social and environmental recovery for cases of loss and decommissioning

Considering the recent history of disruption of mining dams, notably the B1 Dam at the Sapecado Retreat Mine, on 10 September 2014, located in the Municipality of Itabirito, State of Minas Gerais; of the Fundo Dam of the Germano Mine, on 5 November 2015, located in the municipality of Mariana, State of Minas Gerais; and Dam B1, of the Crrego do Feijo mine, on 25 January 2019, in the municipality of Brumadinho, State of Minas Gerais. And taking into account that the these dams were built in the upstream method, ANM enacted Resolution No. 04/2019 which sets forth precautionary regulatory measures aimed at ensuring the stability of mining dams.

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brazil | history, map, culture, population, & facts | britannica

brazil | history, map, culture, population, & facts | britannica

Brazil, officially Federative Republic of Brazil, Portuguese Repblica Federativa do Brasil, country of South America that occupies half the continents landmass. It is the fifth largest country in the world, exceeded in size only by Russia, Canada, China, and the United States, though its area is greater than that of the 48 conterminous U.S. states. Brazil faces the Atlantic Ocean along 4,600 miles (7,400 km) of coastline and shares more than 9,750 miles (15,700 km) of inland borders with every South American country except Chile and Ecuadorspecifically, Uruguay to the south; Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia to the southwest; Peru to the west; Colombia to the northwest; and Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana to the north. Brazil stretches roughly 2,700 miles (4,350 km) from north to south and from east to west to form a vast irregular triangle that encompasses a wide range of tropical and subtropical landscapes, including wetlands, savannas, plateaus, and low mountains. Brazil contains most of the Amazon River basin, which has the worlds largest river system and the worlds most-extensive virgin rainforest. The country contains no desert, high-mountain, or arctic environments.

Brazil is the fifth most-populous country on Earth and accounts for one-third of Latin Americas population. Most of the inhabitants of Brazil are concentrated along the eastern seaboard, although its capital, Braslia, is located far inland and increasing numbers of migrants are moving to the interior. Rio de Janeiro, in the eyes of many of the world, continues to be the preeminent icon of Brazil. The nations burgeoning cities, huge hydroelectric and industrial complexes, mines, and fertile farmlands make it one of the worlds major economies. However, Brazil struggles with extreme social inequalities, environmental degradation, intermittent financial crises, and a sometimes deadlocked political system.

Brazil is unique in the Americas because, following independence from Portugal, it did not fragment into separate countries as did British and Spanish possessions in the region; rather, it retained its identity through the intervening centuries and a variety of forms of government. Because of that hegemony, the Portuguese language is universal except among Brazils native Indians, especially those in the more-remote reaches of the Amazon basin. At the turn of the 21st century, Brazilians marked the 500th anniversary of Portuguese contact with a mixture of public celebration and deprecation.

The Brazilian government has grouped the countrys states into five large geographic and statistical units called the Major Regions (Grandes Regies): North (Norte), Northeast (Nordeste), Central-West (Centro-Oeste), Southeast (Sudeste), and South (Sul). The tropical Northcomprising the states of Acre, Rondnia, Amazonas, Par, Tocantins, Roraima, and Amapcovers more than two-fifths of Brazilian territory and includes the largest portion of Amazon rainforest and parts of the Guiana and Brazilian highlands; however, the region accounts for a limited proportion of the nations population and economic output.

The Northeast, which experiences some of the nations driest and hottest conditions, has nearly one-fifth of Brazils land area and more than one-fourth of the population. It contains the states of Maranho, Piau, Cear, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraba, Alagoas, Sergipe, Bahia, and Pernambuco, the latter including the island of Fernando de Noronha, some 225 miles (360 km) off the Atlantic coast. The regions oldest cities date from the 16th century, when the Portuguese first established sugarcane plantations there. The Northeast accounts for one-fifth of the nations agricultural production, but the industrial and service sectors lag far behind those of the Southeast and South, and the unemployment rate remains high.

The Southeast covers only one-tenth of Brazils territory but has two-fifths of its population and the greatest concentration of industrial and agricultural production in the nation. The region includes So Paulo state, which is the nations economic and demographic heartland, landlocked Minas Gerais, whose very name (meaning Extensive Mines) testifies to great mineral wealth, and the populous coastal states of Esprito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. The city of Rio de Janeiro, the national capital from 1763 to 1960, remains Brazils main cultural and tourist centre.

The South, which stretches below the Tropic of Capricorn, includes the states of Paran, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul. It occupies an area nearly as large as the isle of Britain but is the smallest of Brazils regions. Its diversified economy includes strong manufacturing, agriculture, and service sectors. The South has about one-seventh of the nations population, including many people of European ancestry, particularly from Germany and Italy. The Souths tourist trade partly depends on the spectacular Iguau Falls, at the Argentine border.

The Central-West consists of the states of Gois, Mato Grosso, and Mato Grosso do Sul, as well as the Federal District, in which Braslia is located. The region covers roughly one-fourth of Brazil, including forested valleys, semiarid highlands, and vast wetlands. A small proportion of the nations population lives there, but an increasing number of settlers have been moving into the region and extending its agricultural frontiers.

Brazil is a predominantly tropical country famous for its extensive Amazon lowlands; however, highlands cover most of the national territory. Brazils physical features can be grouped into five main physiographic divisions: the Guiana Highlands in the North, the Amazon lowlands, the Pantanal in the Central-West, the Brazilian Highlands (including the extensive coastal ranges), and the coastal lowlands.

Brazil shares the rugged Guiana Highlands with Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. Forested mesas and mountain ranges, scenic waterfalls, and white-water rivers characterize the area. The highest point in Brazil is Neblina Peak, which reaches 9,888 feet (3,014 metres) along the Venezuelan border in the Serra do Imeri. The Serra da Pacaraima, farther east, rises to 9,094 feet (2,772 metres) at Mount Roraima, where the borders of Venezuela, Guyana, and Brazil meet. The less rugged Acara and Tumuc-Humac (Tumucumaque) ranges border on the Guianas.

The Amazon lowlands are widest along the eastern base of the Andes. They narrow toward the east until, downstream of Manaus, only a narrow ribbon of annually flooded plains (vrzeas) separates the Guiana Highlands to the north from the Brazilian Highlands to the south. The vrzeas fan out again as the watercourse approaches the Atlantic, but no delta extends into the ocean. The basins most widespread topographical features are gently undulating hills called terra firme (solid ground), composed of layers of alluvial soil that were deposited as much as 2.5 million years ago and subsequently uplifted to positions above flood level. Shallow oxbow lakes and wetlands are found throughout the region.

The immense Pantanal, an extension of the Gran Chaco plain, is a region of swamps and marshes in northwestern Mato Grosso do Sul and southern Mato Grosso states and, to a lesser extent, in northern Paraguay and eastern Bolivia; it is one of the largest freshwater wetlands in the world, covering some 54,000 square miles (140,000 square km). The Pantanal is dissected by the effluents of the upper Paraguay River, which overflows its banks during the rainy season, inundating all but the tops of scattered levees and low hills. (See also Drainage.)

global mining equipment - market size, market share, market leaders, demand forecast, sales, company profiles, market research, industry trends and companies

global mining equipment - market size, market share, market leaders, demand forecast, sales, company profiles, market research, industry trends and companies

This study analyzes global supply of and demand for mining equipment. Products covered by this report include: surface mining equipment mining trucks excavators and shovels loaders mining dozers or tractors other surface mining machinery (e.g., compactors, draglines, graders, other earthmoving machinery, and specialized conveying equipment) underground mining equipment augers borers continuous miners drums face-haulage vehicles hydraulic roof supports loader machines longwall mining systems rippers and shearers roadheaders roof bolters underground dozers, loaders, and trucks mining drills and breakers, and portable drilling rigs electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic blastholes core, coal, percussion, and rotary drills track-, trailer-, truck-mounted, and portable drilling rigs breakers crushing, pulverizing, and screening equipment used in mining applications grinding mills and pulverizers portable crushing, screening, washing, and combination plants stationary crushers stationary vibrating screens and related products mineral processing and other miscellaneous mining equipment (e.g., beneficiation, in situ leaching, and underwater mining equipment) centrifuges classifiers dryers feeders flotation and related equipment spiral concentrators thickeners mining machinery parts and attachments (e.g., blades, buckets, filters for beneficiation equipment, mining drill bits, etc.) Excluded from the scope of the study are certain products that can be used at mining sites and are sometimes considered to be mining machinery, including general purpose material handling and oilfield equipment. Also excluded is used and rebuilt mining machinery of all types. Historical data for 2009, 2014, and 2019 and forecasts to 2024 and 2029 are provided for mining equipment supply and demand in current dollars (which are not adjusted to account for inflation). Demand is also segmented by market: metals minerals coal (including anthracide, or hard coal, and bituminous, or soft coal) A complete brochure for this Freedonia research is available for download. Download Brochure Printer Friendly Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic COVID-19 General Trends COVID-19 & Global Economic Growth Impact on the Global Mining Equipment Industry 3. Overview Study Scope Market Cyclicality Demand by Region Production by Region International Trade Trade by Region Net Exporters Net Importers Pricing Patterns 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Global Mining Outlook Mining Output Forecast Minerals Metals Coal Commodity Prices Technology Trends Competition from Used & Remanufactured Equipment Legal & Regulatory Trends Product Safety Emissions Standards Technical Standards Sustainability Efforts 5. Products Demand by Type Surface Mining Equipment Underground Mining Equipment Mining Drills & Breakers Crushing, Pulverizing, & Screening Equipment Mineral Processing & Other Equipment Parts & Attachments 6. Markets Demand by Market Minerals Mining Demand by Mineral Type Aggregates Phosphate Rock & Potash Other Minerals Metals Mining Demand by Metal Type Iron Ore Copper Bauxite Other Metals Coal Mining 7. North America North America: Mining Equipment Market Size North America: Supply & Demand North America: Demand by Product North America: Demand by Market North America: Regional Equipment Manufacturers United States United States: Mining Equipment Market Size United States: Supply & Demand United States: Demand by Product United States: Demand by Market United States: Equipment Manufacturers Canada Canada: Mining Equipment Market Size Canada: Supply & Demand Canada: Demand by Product Canada: Demand by Market Canada: Equipment Manufacturers Mexico Mexico: Mining Equipment Market Size Mexico: Supply & Demand Mexico: Demand by Product Mexico: Demand by Market Mexico: Equipment Manufacturers 8. Central & South America Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Size Central & South America: Supply & Demand Central & South America: Demand by Product Central & South America: Demand by Market Central & South America: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Brazil Brazil: Mining Equipment Market Size Brazil: Supply & Demand Brazil: Demand by Product Brazil: Demand by Market Brazil: Equipment Manufacturers Chile Chile: Mining Equipment Market Size Chile: Supply & Demand Chile: Demand by Product Chile: Demand by Market Chile: Equipment Manufacturers Other Central & South America Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Central & South America: Supply & Demand Other Central & South America: Demand by Product Other Central & South America: Demand by Market Other Central & South America: Supply & Demand by Country Other Central & South America: Equipment Manufacturers 9. Western Europe Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Western Europe: Supply & Demand Western Europe: Demand by Product Western Europe: Demand by Market Western Europe: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Germany Germany: Mining Equipment Market Size Germany: Supply & Demand Germany: Demand by Product Germany: Demand by Market Germany: Equipment Manufacturers Italy Italy: Mining Equipment Market Size Italy: Supply & Demand Italy: Demand by Product Italy: Demand by Market Italy: Equipment Manufacturers France France: Mining Equipment Market Size France: Supply & Demand France: Demand by Product France: Demand by Market France: Equipment Manufacturers United Kingdom United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Market Size United Kingdom: Supply & Demand United Kingdom: Demand by Product United Kingdom: Demand by Market United Kingdom: Equipment Manufacturers Other Western Europe Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Western Europe: Supply & Demand Other Western Europe: Demand by Product Other Western Europe: Demand by Market Other Western Europe: Supply & Demand by Country Other Western Europe: Equipment Manufacturers 10. Eastern Europe Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Eastern Europe: Supply & Demand Eastern Europe: Demand by Product Eastern Europe: Demand by Market Eastern Europe: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Russia Russia: Mining Equipment Market Size Russia: Supply & Demand Russia: Demand by Product Russia: Demand by Market Russia: Equipment Manufacturers Poland Poland: Mining Equipment Market Size Poland: Supply & Demand Poland: Demand by Product Poland: Demand by Market Poland: Equipment Manufacturers Other Eastern Europe Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Eastern Europe: Supply & Demand Other Eastern Europe: Demand by Product Other Eastern Europe: Demand by Market Other Eastern Europe: Equipment Manufacturers 11. Asia/Pacific Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Size Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand Asia/Pacific: Demand by Product Asia/Pacific: Demand by Market Asia/Pacific: Regional Equipment Manufacturers China China: Mining Equipment Market Size China: Supply & Demand China: Demand by Product China: Demand by Market China: Equipment Manufacturers Australia Australia: Mining Equipment Market Size Australia: Supply & Demand Australia: Demand by Product Australia: Demand by Market Australia: Equipment Manufacturers India India: Mining Equipment Market Size India: Supply & Demand India: Demand by Product India: Demand by Market India: Equipment Manufacturers Indonesia Indonesia: Mining Equipment Market Size Indonesia: Supply & Demand Indonesia: Demand by Product Indonesia: Demand by Market Indonesia: Equipment Manufacturers Japan Japan: Mining Equipment Market Size Japan: Supply & Demand Japan: Demand by Product Japan: Demand by Market Japan: Equipment Manufacturers Other Asia/Pacific Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand Other Asia/Pacific: Demand by Product Other Asia/Pacific: Demand by Market Other Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand by Country Other Asia/Pacific: Equipment Manufacturers 12. Africa/Mideast Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Size Africa/Mideast: Supply & Demand Africa/Mideast: Demand by Product Africa/Mideast: Demand by Market Africa/Mideast: Regional Equipment Manufacturers South Africa South Africa: Mining Equipment Market Size South Africa: Supply & Demand South Africa: Demand by Product South Africa: Demand by Market South Africa: Equipment Manufacturers Turkey Turkey: Mining Equipment Market Size Turkey: Supply & Demand Turkey: Demand by Product Turkey: Demand by Market Turkey: Equipment Manufacturers Other Africa/Mideast Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Africa/Mideast: Supply & Demand Other Africa/Mideast: Demand by Product Other Africa/Mideast: Demand by Market Other Africa/Mideast: Equipment Manufacturers 13. Industry Structure Key Findings & Industry Composition Market Share Mergers & Acquisitions List of Industry Participants 14. Appendix Scope Definitions Abbreviations Freedonia Methodology Study-Specific Methodology Sources Associations & Agencies Related Studies & Reports Country Lists by Region Macroeconomic Assumptions Global Economic Outlook Global Population Global Manufacturing Outlook Global Electric Power Generation Outlook List of Tables 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic Table 2-1 | Global Gross Domestic Product, 2019 - 2022 (billion 2019 dollars) Table 2-2 | Annual Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2019 - 2021 (million dollars) 3. Overview Table 3-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-2 | Global Mining Equipment Production by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-3 | Global Mining Equipment Net Exports by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-4 | Global Mining Equipment Pricing Patterns, 2009 - 2029 (2018=100) 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Table 4-1 | Global Mining Output by Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-2 | Global Minerals Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-3 | Global Metals Mining Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-4 | Global Coal Mining Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) 5. Products Table 5-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-2 | Global Surface Mining Equipment Demand by Product & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-3 | Global Underground Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-4 | Global Mining Drill & Breaker Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-5 | Global Crushing, Pulverizing, & Screening Equipment Demand by Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-6 | Global Mineral Processing & Other Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-7 | Global Mining Equipment Parts & Attachments Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 6. Markets Table 6-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-2 | Global Minerals Mining Equipment Demand by Mineral & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-3 | Global Metals Mining Equipment Demand by Metal & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-4 | Global Coal Mining Equipment Demand by Coal Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 7. North America Table 7-1 | North America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-2 | North America: Mining Equipment by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-3 | North America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-4 | United States: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-5 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-6 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-7 | United States: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 7-8 | Canada: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-9 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-10 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-11 | Canada: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 7-12 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-13 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-14 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-15 | Mexico: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 8. Central & South America Table 8-1 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-2 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-3 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-4 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-5 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-6 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-7 | Brazil: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 8-8 | Chile: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-9 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-10 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-11 | Chile: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 8-12 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-13 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-14 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-15 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-16 | Other Central & South America: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 9. Western Europe Table 9-1 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-2 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-3 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-4 | Germany: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-5 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-6 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-7 | Germany: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-8 | Italy: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-9 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-10 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-11 | Italy: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-12 | France: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-13 | France: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-14 | France: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-15 | France: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-16 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-17 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-18 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-19 | United Kingdom: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-20 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-21 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-22 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-23 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009-2029 (million dollars) Table 9-24 | Other Western Europe: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 10. Eastern Europe Table 10-1 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-2 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-3 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-4 | Russia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-5 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-6 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-7 | Russia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 10-8 | Poland: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-9 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-10 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-11 | Poland: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 10-12 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-13 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-14 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-15 | Other Eastern Europe: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 11. Asia/Pacific Table 11-1 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-2 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-3 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-4 | China: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-5 | China: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-6 | China: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-7 | China: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-8 | Australia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-9 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-10 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-11 | Australia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-12 | India: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-13 | India: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-14 | India: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-15 | India: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-16 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-17 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-18 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-19 | Indonesia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-20 | Japan: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-21 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-22 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-23 | Japan: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-24 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-25 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-26 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-27 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009-2029 (million dollars) Table 11-28 | Other Asia/Pacific: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 12. Africa/Mideast Table 12-1 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-2 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-3 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-4 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-5 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-6 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-7 | South Africa: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 12-8 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-9 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-10 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-11 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-12 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-13 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-14 | Other Africa/Mideast: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 13. Industry Structure Table 13-1 | Leading Manufacturers of Mining Equipment, 2019 (million dollars) Table 13-2 | Key Mergers and Acquisitions in the Mining Equipment Industry Table 13-3 | Selected Industry Participants 14. Appendix Table 14-1 | Major Mined Metals Table 14-2 | Major Mined Minerals Table 14-3 | Relevant HS Codes Table 14-4 | Relevant NACE Codes Table 14-5 | Relevant NAICS & SIC Codes Table 14-6 | Abbreviations & Acronyms Used in Study Table 14-7 | Countries in North America Table 14-8 | Countries in Central & South America Table 14-9 | Countries in Western Europe Table 14-10 | Countries in Eastern Europe Table 14-11 | Countries in the Asia/Pacific Region Table 14-12 | Countries in the Africa/Mideast Region Table 14-13 | Global Gross Domestic Product by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (billion 2018 dollars) Table 14-14 | Global Population by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (million persons) Table 14-15 | Global Manufacturing Value Added by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (billion 2018 dollars) Table 14-16 | Global Electric Power Generation by Source & Region, 2009 - 2029 (billion kilowatt-hours) List of Figures 1. Executive Summary Figure 1-1 | Global Mining Equipment Market 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic Figure 2-1 | Real GPD by Region, 2019 - 2022 (% annual change) Figure 2-2 | Annual Global Mining Equipment Demand Growth, 2018 - 2024 (million dollars) 3. Overview Figure 3-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 3-2 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Figure 3-3 | Global Mining Equipment Production by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Figure 3-4 | Leading Mining Equipment Net Exporters & Net Importers, 2019 (million dollars) Figure 3-5 | Global Mining Equipment Pricing, 2009 - 2029 (percent annual change) 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Figure 4-1 | Global Mining Output Share by Region, 2019 (billion metric tons) Figure 4-2 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Nickel & Copper, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric ton) Figure 4-3 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Zinc, Lead, & Aluminum, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric ton) Figure 4-4 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Gold & Platinum, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per troy ounce) Figure 4-5 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Coal, Iron Ore, & Silver, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric tons & dollars per troy ounce) 5. Products Figure 5-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 6. Markets Figure 6-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 7. North America Figure 7-1 | North America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-2 | North America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 7-3 | United States: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-4 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 7-5 | Canada: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-6 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million US dollars & million Canadian dollars) Figure 7-7 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-8 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million pesos) 8. Central & South America Figure 8-1 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-2 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 8-3 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-4 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion real) Figure 8-5 | Chile: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-6 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion peso) Figure 8-7 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-8 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 9. Western Europe Figure 9-1 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-2 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 9-3 | Germany: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-4 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-5 | Italy: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-6 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-7 | France: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-8 | France: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-9 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-10 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million pounds) Figure 9-11 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-12 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 10. Eastern Europe Figure 10-1 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-2 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 10-3 | Russia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-4 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion ruble) Figure 10-5 | Poland: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-6 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million zloty) Figure 10-7 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-8 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 11. Asia/Pacific Figure 11-1 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-2 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (billion dollars) Figure 11-3 | China: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-4 | China: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (billion dollars & billion yuan) Figure 11-5 | Australia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-6 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million US dollars & million Australian dollars) Figure 11-7 | India: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-8 | India: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion rupee) Figure 11-9 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-10 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & trillion rupiah) Figure 11-11 | Japan: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-12 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion yen) Figure 11-13 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-14 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 12. Africa/Mideast Figure 12-1 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-2 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 12-3 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-4 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million rand) Figure 12-5 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-6 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million lira) Figure 12-7 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-8 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 13. Industry Structure Figure 13-1 | Global Mining Equipment Market Share by Company, 2019 (billion dollars) Figure 13-2 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Leading Supplier Figure 13-3 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Second Leading Supplier Figure 13-4 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Third Leading Supplier 14. Appendix by The Freedonia Group, a division of MarketResearch.com

Excluded from the scope of the study are certain products that can be used at mining sites and are sometimes considered to be mining machinery, including general purpose material handling and oilfield equipment. Also excluded is used and rebuilt mining machinery of all types.

Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic COVID-19 General Trends COVID-19 & Global Economic Growth Impact on the Global Mining Equipment Industry 3. Overview Study Scope Market Cyclicality Demand by Region Production by Region International Trade Trade by Region Net Exporters Net Importers Pricing Patterns 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Global Mining Outlook Mining Output Forecast Minerals Metals Coal Commodity Prices Technology Trends Competition from Used & Remanufactured Equipment Legal & Regulatory Trends Product Safety Emissions Standards Technical Standards Sustainability Efforts 5. Products Demand by Type Surface Mining Equipment Underground Mining Equipment Mining Drills & Breakers Crushing, Pulverizing, & Screening Equipment Mineral Processing & Other Equipment Parts & Attachments 6. Markets Demand by Market Minerals Mining Demand by Mineral Type Aggregates Phosphate Rock & Potash Other Minerals Metals Mining Demand by Metal Type Iron Ore Copper Bauxite Other Metals Coal Mining 7. North America North America: Mining Equipment Market Size North America: Supply & Demand North America: Demand by Product North America: Demand by Market North America: Regional Equipment Manufacturers United States United States: Mining Equipment Market Size United States: Supply & Demand United States: Demand by Product United States: Demand by Market United States: Equipment Manufacturers Canada Canada: Mining Equipment Market Size Canada: Supply & Demand Canada: Demand by Product Canada: Demand by Market Canada: Equipment Manufacturers Mexico Mexico: Mining Equipment Market Size Mexico: Supply & Demand Mexico: Demand by Product Mexico: Demand by Market Mexico: Equipment Manufacturers 8. Central & South America Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Size Central & South America: Supply & Demand Central & South America: Demand by Product Central & South America: Demand by Market Central & South America: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Brazil Brazil: Mining Equipment Market Size Brazil: Supply & Demand Brazil: Demand by Product Brazil: Demand by Market Brazil: Equipment Manufacturers Chile Chile: Mining Equipment Market Size Chile: Supply & Demand Chile: Demand by Product Chile: Demand by Market Chile: Equipment Manufacturers Other Central & South America Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Central & South America: Supply & Demand Other Central & South America: Demand by Product Other Central & South America: Demand by Market Other Central & South America: Supply & Demand by Country Other Central & South America: Equipment Manufacturers 9. Western Europe Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Western Europe: Supply & Demand Western Europe: Demand by Product Western Europe: Demand by Market Western Europe: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Germany Germany: Mining Equipment Market Size Germany: Supply & Demand Germany: Demand by Product Germany: Demand by Market Germany: Equipment Manufacturers Italy Italy: Mining Equipment Market Size Italy: Supply & Demand Italy: Demand by Product Italy: Demand by Market Italy: Equipment Manufacturers France France: Mining Equipment Market Size France: Supply & Demand France: Demand by Product France: Demand by Market France: Equipment Manufacturers United Kingdom United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Market Size United Kingdom: Supply & Demand United Kingdom: Demand by Product United Kingdom: Demand by Market United Kingdom: Equipment Manufacturers Other Western Europe Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Western Europe: Supply & Demand Other Western Europe: Demand by Product Other Western Europe: Demand by Market Other Western Europe: Supply & Demand by Country Other Western Europe: Equipment Manufacturers 10. Eastern Europe Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Eastern Europe: Supply & Demand Eastern Europe: Demand by Product Eastern Europe: Demand by Market Eastern Europe: Regional Equipment Manufacturers Russia Russia: Mining Equipment Market Size Russia: Supply & Demand Russia: Demand by Product Russia: Demand by Market Russia: Equipment Manufacturers Poland Poland: Mining Equipment Market Size Poland: Supply & Demand Poland: Demand by Product Poland: Demand by Market Poland: Equipment Manufacturers Other Eastern Europe Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Eastern Europe: Supply & Demand Other Eastern Europe: Demand by Product Other Eastern Europe: Demand by Market Other Eastern Europe: Equipment Manufacturers 11. Asia/Pacific Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Size Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand Asia/Pacific: Demand by Product Asia/Pacific: Demand by Market Asia/Pacific: Regional Equipment Manufacturers China China: Mining Equipment Market Size China: Supply & Demand China: Demand by Product China: Demand by Market China: Equipment Manufacturers Australia Australia: Mining Equipment Market Size Australia: Supply & Demand Australia: Demand by Product Australia: Demand by Market Australia: Equipment Manufacturers India India: Mining Equipment Market Size India: Supply & Demand India: Demand by Product India: Demand by Market India: Equipment Manufacturers Indonesia Indonesia: Mining Equipment Market Size Indonesia: Supply & Demand Indonesia: Demand by Product Indonesia: Demand by Market Indonesia: Equipment Manufacturers Japan Japan: Mining Equipment Market Size Japan: Supply & Demand Japan: Demand by Product Japan: Demand by Market Japan: Equipment Manufacturers Other Asia/Pacific Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand Other Asia/Pacific: Demand by Product Other Asia/Pacific: Demand by Market Other Asia/Pacific: Supply & Demand by Country Other Asia/Pacific: Equipment Manufacturers 12. Africa/Mideast Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Size Africa/Mideast: Supply & Demand Africa/Mideast: Demand by Product Africa/Mideast: Demand by Market Africa/Mideast: Regional Equipment Manufacturers South Africa South Africa: Mining Equipment Market Size South Africa: Supply & Demand South Africa: Demand by Product South Africa: Demand by Market South Africa: Equipment Manufacturers Turkey Turkey: Mining Equipment Market Size Turkey: Supply & Demand Turkey: Demand by Product Turkey: Demand by Market Turkey: Equipment Manufacturers Other Africa/Mideast Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Size Other Africa/Mideast: Supply & Demand Other Africa/Mideast: Demand by Product Other Africa/Mideast: Demand by Market Other Africa/Mideast: Equipment Manufacturers 13. Industry Structure Key Findings & Industry Composition Market Share Mergers & Acquisitions List of Industry Participants 14. Appendix Scope Definitions Abbreviations Freedonia Methodology Study-Specific Methodology Sources Associations & Agencies Related Studies & Reports Country Lists by Region Macroeconomic Assumptions Global Economic Outlook Global Population Global Manufacturing Outlook Global Electric Power Generation Outlook List of Tables 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic Table 2-1 | Global Gross Domestic Product, 2019 - 2022 (billion 2019 dollars) Table 2-2 | Annual Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2019 - 2021 (million dollars) 3. Overview Table 3-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-2 | Global Mining Equipment Production by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-3 | Global Mining Equipment Net Exports by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 3-4 | Global Mining Equipment Pricing Patterns, 2009 - 2029 (2018=100) 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Table 4-1 | Global Mining Output by Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-2 | Global Minerals Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-3 | Global Metals Mining Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) Table 4-4 | Global Coal Mining Output by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million metric tons) 5. Products Table 5-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-2 | Global Surface Mining Equipment Demand by Product & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-3 | Global Underground Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-4 | Global Mining Drill & Breaker Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-5 | Global Crushing, Pulverizing, & Screening Equipment Demand by Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-6 | Global Mineral Processing & Other Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 5-7 | Global Mining Equipment Parts & Attachments Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 6. Markets Table 6-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-2 | Global Minerals Mining Equipment Demand by Mineral & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-3 | Global Metals Mining Equipment Demand by Metal & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 6-4 | Global Coal Mining Equipment Demand by Coal Type & Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 7. North America Table 7-1 | North America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-2 | North America: Mining Equipment by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-3 | North America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-4 | United States: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-5 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-6 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-7 | United States: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 7-8 | Canada: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-9 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-10 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 7-11 | Canada: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 7-12 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-13 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-14 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 7-15 | Mexico: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 8. Central & South America Table 8-1 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-2 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-3 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-4 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-5 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-6 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-7 | Brazil: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 8-8 | Chile: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-9 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-10 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-11 | Chile: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 8-12 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-13 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-14 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-15 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 8-16 | Other Central & South America: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 9. Western Europe Table 9-1 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-2 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-3 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-4 | Germany: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-5 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-6 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-7 | Germany: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-8 | Italy: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-9 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-10 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-11 | Italy: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-12 | France: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-13 | France: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-14 | France: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-15 | France: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-16 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-17 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-18 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-19 | United Kingdom: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 9-20 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-21 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-22 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 9-23 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009-2029 (million dollars) Table 9-24 | Other Western Europe: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 10. Eastern Europe Table 10-1 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-2 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-3 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-4 | Russia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-5 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-6 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-7 | Russia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 10-8 | Poland: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-9 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-10 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-11 | Poland: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 10-12 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-13 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-14 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 10-15 | Other Eastern Europe: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 11. Asia/Pacific Table 11-1 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-2 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-3 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-4 | China: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-5 | China: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-6 | China: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-7 | China: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-8 | Australia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-9 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-10 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million US dollars) Table 11-11 | Australia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-12 | India: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-13 | India: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-14 | India: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-15 | India: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-16 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-17 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-18 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-19 | Indonesia: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-20 | Japan: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-21 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-22 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-23 | Japan: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 11-24 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-25 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-26 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 11-27 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand by Country, 2009-2029 (million dollars) Table 11-28 | Other Asia/Pacific: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 12. Africa/Mideast Table 12-1 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-2 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-3 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-4 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-5 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-6 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-7 | South Africa: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers Table 12-8 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-9 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-10 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-11 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Supply & Demand, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-12 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-13 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Table 12-14 | Other Africa/Mideast: Leading Mining Equipment Manufacturers 13. Industry Structure Table 13-1 | Leading Manufacturers of Mining Equipment, 2019 (million dollars) Table 13-2 | Key Mergers and Acquisitions in the Mining Equipment Industry Table 13-3 | Selected Industry Participants 14. Appendix Table 14-1 | Major Mined Metals Table 14-2 | Major Mined Minerals Table 14-3 | Relevant HS Codes Table 14-4 | Relevant NACE Codes Table 14-5 | Relevant NAICS & SIC Codes Table 14-6 | Abbreviations & Acronyms Used in Study Table 14-7 | Countries in North America Table 14-8 | Countries in Central & South America Table 14-9 | Countries in Western Europe Table 14-10 | Countries in Eastern Europe Table 14-11 | Countries in the Asia/Pacific Region Table 14-12 | Countries in the Africa/Mideast Region Table 14-13 | Global Gross Domestic Product by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (billion 2018 dollars) Table 14-14 | Global Population by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (million persons) Table 14-15 | Global Manufacturing Value Added by Region & Country, 2009 - 2029 (billion 2018 dollars) Table 14-16 | Global Electric Power Generation by Source & Region, 2009 - 2029 (billion kilowatt-hours) List of Figures 1. Executive Summary Figure 1-1 | Global Mining Equipment Market 2. Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic Figure 2-1 | Real GPD by Region, 2019 - 2022 (% annual change) Figure 2-2 | Annual Global Mining Equipment Demand Growth, 2018 - 2024 (million dollars) 3. Overview Figure 3-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 3-2 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Figure 3-3 | Global Mining Equipment Production by Region, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) Figure 3-4 | Leading Mining Equipment Net Exporters & Net Importers, 2019 (million dollars) Figure 3-5 | Global Mining Equipment Pricing, 2009 - 2029 (percent annual change) 4. Factors Impacting Mining Equipment Industry Growth Figure 4-1 | Global Mining Output Share by Region, 2019 (billion metric tons) Figure 4-2 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Nickel & Copper, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric ton) Figure 4-3 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Zinc, Lead, & Aluminum, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric ton) Figure 4-4 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Gold & Platinum, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per troy ounce) Figure 4-5 | Historical Pricing for Selected Commodities: Coal, Iron Ore, & Silver, 2003 - 2020 (dollars per metric tons & dollars per troy ounce) 5. Products Figure 5-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Product, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 6. Markets Figure 6-1 | Global Mining Equipment Demand by Market, 2009 - 2029 (million dollars) 7. North America Figure 7-1 | North America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-2 | North America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 7-3 | United States: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-4 | United States: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 7-5 | Canada: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-6 | Canada: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million US dollars & million Canadian dollars) Figure 7-7 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 7-8 | Mexico: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million pesos) 8. Central & South America Figure 8-1 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-2 | Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 8-3 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-4 | Brazil: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion real) Figure 8-5 | Chile: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-6 | Chile: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion peso) Figure 8-7 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 8-8 | Other Central & South America: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 9. Western Europe Figure 9-1 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-2 | Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 9-3 | Germany: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-4 | Germany: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-5 | Italy: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-6 | Italy: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-7 | France: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-8 | France: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million euro) Figure 9-9 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-10 | United Kingdom: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million pounds) Figure 9-11 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 9-12 | Other Western Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 10. Eastern Europe Figure 10-1 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-2 | Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 10-3 | Russia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-4 | Russia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion ruble) Figure 10-5 | Poland: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-6 | Poland: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million zloty) Figure 10-7 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 10-8 | Other Eastern Europe: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 11. Asia/Pacific Figure 11-1 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-2 | Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (billion dollars) Figure 11-3 | China: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-4 | China: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (billion dollars & billion yuan) Figure 11-5 | Australia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-6 | Australia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million US dollars & million Australian dollars) Figure 11-7 | India: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-8 | India: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion rupee) Figure 11-9 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-10 | Indonesia: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & trillion rupiah) Figure 11-11 | Japan: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-12 | Japan: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & billion yen) Figure 11-13 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 11-14 | Other Asia/Pacific: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 12. Africa/Mideast Figure 12-1 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-2 | Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) Figure 12-3 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-4 | South Africa: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million rand) Figure 12-5 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-6 | Turkey: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars & million lira) Figure 12-7 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Market Key Indicators, 2019 Figure 12-8 | Other Africa/Mideast: Mining Equipment Demand, 2002 - 2019 (million dollars) 13. Industry Structure Figure 13-1 | Global Mining Equipment Market Share by Company, 2019 (billion dollars) Figure 13-2 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Leading Supplier Figure 13-3 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Second Leading Supplier Figure 13-4 | Global Mining Equipment Industry: Third Leading Supplier 14. Appendix by The Freedonia Group, a division of MarketResearch.com

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Market Size Resources|COVID-19 Economic Impact Tracker|Commercial Refrigeration Equipment|Frozen Food Packaging|Lawn Mowers|Outdoor Lighting Fixtures|Residential Lighting Fixtures|Global Lubricants|Global Engine Oils

The Freedonia Group provides clients with valuable insights into Market Research, Market Size, Market Share, Market Leaders, Demand Forecasts, Sales, Company Profiles, Industry Trends, and key participating Companies.

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