considering double knee replacement surgery

considering a double knee replacement? heres what you need to know

considering a double knee replacement? heres what you need to know

Newswise Orthopedic surgeons perform almost 700,000 knee replacements in the United States each year. The procedure has a high success rate, alleviating pain and restoring an active lifestyle. Its fairly common for patients to have arthritis in both knees, and they often decide to have both of them replaced. The dilemma many people face is whether to have surgery on both sides at the same time, a procedure referred to as bilateral knee replacement, or two separate procedures.Geoffrey Westrich, MD, research director of Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), advises people to carefully weigh the pros and cons before making a decision. Many people want to have a double knee replacement because they feel they can get it over with faster since theres one surgery, one hospital stay and one course of rehabilitation, he says. The bilateral procedure enables patients to get back to their normal lives more quickly, and for the right patient, its a good option. However, double knee replacement is not for everyone, and people should be well-informed before making a decision. Studies show that bilateral knee replacement has a higher rate of complications, including cardiovascular problems and blood clots. Patients lose more blood, so they are more likely to need a blood transfusion. Rehabilitation is also much more demanding. Candidates must be in excellent physical condition, aside from the arthritis, with no underlying health problems, Dr. Westrich says. Not too long ago, people thought that if you had one knee replaced, the pain and rehab would be so taxing you wouldnt want to come back for surgery on the other knee, he says. But nowadays, with advances in surgical techniques, anesthesia and pain management, the recovery for a single knee replacement at a high-volume joint replacement center is much easier and faster than it was in the past. In our experience, virtually every patient comes back for the second knee replacement. Patients generally wait at least three months in between surgeries.Patient Selection ImportantOverall, the success rate is high for a same-day double knee replacement, but patient selection is important, according to Dr. Westrich. He says it should be out of the question for patients with a history of heart or lung problems, or any other serious medical condition. At HSS, bilateral knee replacements are not performed in individuals over 75 years old due to the greater risk of complications in older patients.Patients who meet the criteria need to know exactly what to expect so they can make an informed decision about same-day double knee replacement, Dr. Westich says. The recovery and rehabilitation after bilateral knee replacement are much more challenging because greater physical and emotional strain is placed on the body. The rehab is also much more difficult because patients cant rely on a stable leg for support.Another consideration is where an individual will receive physical therapy. Bilateral knee replacement patients almost always spend time in a rehabilitation facility after surgery, while those who have a single knee replacement often go straight home from the hospital and receive physical therapy at home.Whether having two separate knee replacements or both sides replaced simultaneously, the orthopedic surgeon should have a detailed discussion with the patient about what to expect.Because of the special considerations involved in double knee replacement, Dr. Westrich says its especially important for patients to choose a highly experienced orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knee replacement.Patients should also choose a hospital or specialty center that performs a high volume of joint replacements, such as Hospital for Special Surgery, he says. The entire staff will be accustomed to dealing with the needs of double knee replacement patients before, during and after the surgery.

Newswise Orthopedic surgeons perform almost 700,000 knee replacements in the United States each year. The procedure has a high success rate, alleviating pain and restoring an active lifestyle. Its fairly common for patients to have arthritis in both knees, and they often decide to have both of them replaced. The dilemma many people face is whether to have surgery on both sides at the same time, a procedure referred to as bilateral knee replacement, or two separate procedures.

Geoffrey Westrich, MD, research director of Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), advises people to carefully weigh the pros and cons before making a decision. Many people want to have a double knee replacement because they feel they can get it over with faster since theres one surgery, one hospital stay and one course of rehabilitation, he says. The bilateral procedure enables patients to get back to their normal lives more quickly, and for the right patient, its a good option. However, double knee replacement is not for everyone, and people should be well-informed before making a decision.

Studies show that bilateral knee replacement has a higher rate of complications, including cardiovascular problems and blood clots. Patients lose more blood, so they are more likely to need a blood transfusion. Rehabilitation is also much more demanding. Candidates must be in excellent physical condition, aside from the arthritis, with no underlying health problems, Dr. Westrich says.

Not too long ago, people thought that if you had one knee replaced, the pain and rehab would be so taxing you wouldnt want to come back for surgery on the other knee, he says. But nowadays, with advances in surgical techniques, anesthesia and pain management, the recovery for a single knee replacement at a high-volume joint replacement center is much easier and faster than it was in the past. In our experience, virtually every patient comes back for the second knee replacement. Patients generally wait at least three months in between surgeries.

Overall, the success rate is high for a same-day double knee replacement, but patient selection is important, according to Dr. Westrich. He says it should be out of the question for patients with a history of heart or lung problems, or any other serious medical condition. At HSS, bilateral knee replacements are not performed in individuals over 75 years old due to the greater risk of complications in older patients.

Patients who meet the criteria need to know exactly what to expect so they can make an informed decision about same-day double knee replacement, Dr. Westich says. The recovery and rehabilitation after bilateral knee replacement are much more challenging because greater physical and emotional strain is placed on the body. The rehab is also much more difficult because patients cant rely on a stable leg for support.

Another consideration is where an individual will receive physical therapy. Bilateral knee replacement patients almost always spend time in a rehabilitation facility after surgery, while those who have a single knee replacement often go straight home from the hospital and receive physical therapy at home.

Because of the special considerations involved in double knee replacement, Dr. Westrich says its especially important for patients to choose a highly experienced orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knee replacement.

Patients should also choose a hospital or specialty center that performs a high volume of joint replacements, such as Hospital for Special Surgery, he says. The entire staff will be accustomed to dealing with the needs of double knee replacement patients before, during and after the surgery.

causes of pain after knee replacement surgery

causes of pain after knee replacement surgery

Knee replacements are among the most commonly performed and highly successful orthopedic surgical procedures. A knee replacement is done when the knee joint has worn out, most often as a result of wear-and-tear arthritis.

When a knee replacement surgery is performed, the worn-out cartilage is removed and the ends of the bone are shaped. Over the ends of the bone, a metal implant is fit into place, and a plastic spacer is placed between the metal implants. This reconstructive procedure is performed to allow a smooth, pain-free movement of the joint.

When a knee replacement is performed and the rehabilitation has been completed, more than 90% of recipients will rate their outcome as good or excellent. However, not everyone has a pain-free knee after the procedure. About 10% will be less than satisfied with the results.

Some of the reasons for dissatisfaction are obvious, including postoperative infection or a bone fracture around their replacement. However, the most common reason is the development of persistent pain around the newly replaced joint.

The most important step in finding a solution to persistent discomfort is to first determine the cause of the pain. Without this knowledge, it is very difficult to find an appropriate treatment. The most common causes of pain after knee replacement include:

Your surgeon will take several steps to evaluate your pain. The first step simply involves talking with you and discussing your pain. Pain can have many different qualities, and the type of pain described can help your doctor make an accurate diagnosis.

While pain when risingknown as start-up painusually resolves within a few months, other types of pain may suggest a more serious condition. In some cases, the location and timing of the pain can help a doctor pinpoint the underlying cause.

Your surgeon will then want to examine the knee. A physical exam can help identify infection, stiffness, and alignment issues. Ensuring that the mechanics of the knee replacement are sound is important. Just like having the proper alignment in your car, it is important that the knee replacement is properly aligned and balanced.

X-rays and other studies can assess alignment and loosening. Subtle loosening may not show up on a regular X-ray, and a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan may be performed. In addition, there are specialty imaging studies that can be performed specifically to assess for problems related to the knee replacement.

X-rays performed fluoroscopically (in real-time) and stress radiographs to evaluate ligaments are sometimes performed. MRI is better suited for soft tissue injuries and can be particularly useful if there is infection or inflammation related to bursitis or tendonitis.

Laboratory studies that are sometimes performed include markers of inflammation such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and a C-reactive protein (CRP) tests. Elevations of these markers of inflammation can indicate an infection or other inflammatory medical conditions.

One of the most commonly performed procedures for a painful knee replacement is arthrocentesis (joint aspiration). This involves the insertion of a needle into the knee joint to obtain some fluid from around the implant.

The fluid, called synovial fluid, can be analyzed in the lab to look for signs of infection or abnormal crystallization around the knee joint. Tests commonly performed on synovial fluid include a white blood cell count (WBC), bacterial gram stain, and bacterial cultures.

The most important step is understanding the cause of pain since blindly treating pain without knowing the cause is unlikely to lead to a good result. In some situations, pain may be treated with medications and physical therapy.

In other cases, particularly if loosening, infection or alignment issues are suspected, another surgery called a revision knee replacement may be necessary. The revision surgery may be minimally invasive or require removing the implanted knee and starting over.

Sometimes the decision to treat pain after knee replacement is urgent, while, at other times, giving the new knee time to adapt may be more appropriate. Your surgeon can help to guide you on the most appropriate treatment for the cause of your pain.

There are situations where the source of pain cannot be identified. In such instances, it is best to treat the condition conservatively since revision surgery is unlikely to lead to an improvement. If in doubt, seek a second opinion.

While these situations are unusual, they can incredibly frustrating. Even so, it is important to remain patient and not rush to judgment without a careful and extensive expert evaluation. Doing so may expose you to unnecessary expenses, additional frustration, and leave you in no better condition than when you started.

28 questions you should ask your knee replacement doctor: elite sports medicine + orthopedics: orthopedics

28 questions you should ask your knee replacement doctor: elite sports medicine + orthopedics: orthopedics

The following guide is provided to patients of Dr. Gregory Raab, an orthopedic surgeon in Nashville, TN that specializes in total joint replacement and revisions in the knee and hip. If you are suffering from knee pain, schedule an appointment with a knee replacement doctor near you to find out if you are a candidate for total knee replacement surgery.

90-95% of total knee replacements should last 15 years or longer. Some of the most important factors in maintaining your knee replacement are the type and level of your activity, keeping your weight under control and maintaining regular follow-up visits.

Most people are in the hospital from 1-2 days. Most patients return directly home after discharge from the hospital. However, there are some patients who live alone, have no available caregivers or who require some additional recovery. These patients may qualify for a short-term rehab stay at an outside facility for further physical therapy.

Patients heal from surgery at different rates. In most cases, you will be limited to the use of a walker or crutches for approximately 2-4 weeks. As you continue to improve you will transition to using a cane when out of the house and no supportive device around the house for several weeks. You will gradually return to normal function without any assistive devices. This usually takes approximately 3 months but may take more or less time depending on your preoperative level of health and function.

After the first initial bandage change in the hospital, typically on post-op day #1 or 2, you will only need a minimal bandage. Should there be any drainage, dry, clean gauze should be applied to protect the wound and keep your sheets and clothing clean.

You may shower beginning on the 2nd day after your operation. You will typically have steri-strips (white pieces of tape) over your incision line. These may get wet and just need to be gently patted dry after your shower. The steri-strips will gradually begin to loosen and curl around the edges 10-14 days after surgery. At your 2-week post-operative visit these strips will be removed. Underneath will be a healed incision line. Also, you may notice a clear piece of thread coming from the top and/or bottom of your incision line. These are absorbable sutures and will often fall off on their own, or they will be trimmed at the skin level at your first post-op visit.

Total joint replacement is a big surgery. It is not unusual to require some form of pain medication for approximately 6-8 weeks. Initially, the medication will be a strong oral narcotic such as oxycodone or hydrocodone. Most people begin to wean off their strong pain medication 3-4 weeks after surgery, requiring it mostly around times of therapy. Moderate strength medication, like Celebrex, Meloxicam or Ibuprofen and/or Tylenol may be needed for an additional 3-4 weeks.

If you are on Coumadin or Xarelto prior to surgery, it is important to let your knee replacement doctor and the anesthesia staff know prior to surgery so the necessary adjustment can be made. Most patients will stop their Coumadin 7 days prior to surgery and switch to an injectable blood thinner up until the night before surgery. Once the surgery is over, you will continue the injectable and Coumadin until your Coumadin levels have returned to their pre-operative levels. If you have had a history of blood clots or pulmonary embolism, additional arrangements may also be made.

While in the hospital and for several weeks after surgery, ice is most helpful to keep down swelling. In the hospital you should have ice applied to your knee at least 2-3 times daily. At home the most convenient ice bag is a bag of frozen peas that will conform easily to your knee and can be frozen. A warm towel placed around your knee prior to therapy sessions may help loosen up your knee, and ice may be used after therapy to cool the joint down.

If you had surgery on your right or left knee and drive an automatic transmission, you should not drive for at least 4-6 weeks. After 4-6 weeks you may return to driving as soon as you feel comfortable, are not taking narcotic pain medications, and can safely and quickly move the leg from the accelerator to the brake petal. For a stick shift, or standard transmission, it will be at least 4-6 weeks regardless of which leg you had surgery. Again, you should not drive if you are taking narcotics.

Yes. You should avoid dental cleaning and dental work for several weeks prior to surgery and at least 12 weeks following surgery. After that point, antibiotics are recommended prior to all dental visits, including regular cleanings.

This depends greatly on your profession and your obligations at work. Typically, if your work is primarily sedentary, you may return after 3-4 weeks. If your work is more rigorous, you may require up to 3 months before you can return to full, unrestricted duty.

Most patients may travel as soon as they are comfortable after an initial 2-week visit with their knee replacement doctor. It is recommended that you get up to stretch or walk at least once an hour when taking long trips. This is important to help prevent stiffness and lessen the risk of blood clots.

You may return to many activities as soon as tolerated including walking, gardening, golf, and doubles tennis. Some of the best activities to help with motion and strengthening are swimming and the use of a stationary bicycle. You should avoid high impact stresses to the knee such as running and jumping and vigorous sports such as singles tennis, basketball, water skiing, and downhill snow skiing.

Early on after surgery it is important to keep the knee as straight as possible except when specifically working on bending. Flexion will continue to improve over the first several weeks post-operatively, but extension is often maximized after the first couple of weeks.

The amount of bend will gradually increase while you are in the hospital. Typically, patients will use the machine for 1-2 hours at a time, 2-3 times a day. Except under rare circumstances, you will not need a CPM when you go home.

Yes. Initially, you will lead with your non-operated leg when going up stairs, and lead with your operated leg when coming down. As your muscles get stronger and your motion improves, you will be able to perform stairs in a more normal fashion, usually after 4 weeks.

Yes. Physical therapy plays a very important role in your recovery. You will be seen by a physical therapist soon after your surgery and throughout your hospital stay. Once you are discharged from the hospital you will continue to go to a therapy center close to home 2-3 times a week for about a month. If your in-hospital recovery is somewhat slower than typical you may need to spend some time building up your strength at an inpatient rehabilitation facility. The hospital case managers will assist in making those arrangements if necessary.

It is very common to have some constipation after surgery. This is due to a number of factors and is aggravated by the need to take narcotic pain medications. Regular physical activity and the return to a healthy, balanced diet with adequate hydration will assist with this. In addition, a simple over the counter stool softener/ laxative may help with the prevention of this problem. In rare cases, you may require a suppository or an enema.

You may set off the alarm at some airport security checkpoints. Be proactive and inform the personnel that you have a total knee replacement and will most likely set off the alarm. Wear clothing that allows you to show the knee incision without difficulty. A letter from your surgeon or a wallet card is no longer of any help when passing through security.

It is not uncommon to have feelings of depression after surgery. This may be due to a variety of factors, such as limited mobility, discomfort, temporary increased dependency on other and medication side effects. Feelings of depression will typically fade as you begin to return to more regular activities and social functions.

This is a common complaint after surgery. Nonprescription remedies such as Benadryl or melatonin may be effective. If this continues to be a problem, prescription medication from your primary care physician may be necessary.

After several months you may certainly try to kneel. It may be painful at first but will not be harmful or damaging to your total knee. Much of the discomfort often comes from kneeling on your recent incision and the surrounding tissues that are healing.

Range of motion varies and depends on many individual factors. The single greatest determinant is your initial range of motion just prior to surgery. The average patient achieves approximately 110-130 degrees of flexion by one year post-operatively. Some patients achieve less and others much more.

Any condition which is new or out of the ordinary for your total knee is worth at least a phone call, an office visit, or possibly a trip to the Emergency Room. Prolonged fever greater than 102 degrees, increasing or worsening pain in your knee, increasing or worsening redness in your knee, increasing or smelly drainage from your incision, worsening calf pain and swelling, chest pain and shortness of breath are all conditions which warrant immediate medical advice.

While you are in the hospital, its possible your knee replacement doctor will follow up with you each day. Under rare circumstances, another orthopedic surgeon or physician assistant may check on you your knee replacement doctors absence. Once discharged from the hospital, follow up appointments are usually made at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year. After the one-year anniversary, appointments should be made to check your knee at least every 1-2 years or if new or concerning symptoms develop.

Having a Total Knee Replacement is a team effort, and YOU are the most important team member. If you have other questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to your knee replacement doctor.

Orthopedic surgeons treat conditions in the knee, shoulder, elbow, back, hand, foot, and more. Learn more about orthopedic surgery and how you can find the best doctor near you. Elite has 12 highly skilled orthopedic surgeons in Nashville, TN.

Do you need to see a back doctor in Nashville, TN? Our team of fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons include some of the best spine specialists near you. Learn about symptoms and prevention of back pain and back conditions.

Do you need to see a hand doctor in Nashville, TN? Our award-winning orthopedic surgeons include some of the best hand specialists near you. Check out this guide to see if you could live a lower pain lifestyle.

If you are suffering from severe joint pain, it may be a sign that you need a joint replacement. You should consult with an orthopedic doctor that will recommend a treatment plan, possibly including surgery from a joint replacement specialist.

two knee replacements at once: the good and the bad

two knee replacements at once: the good and the bad

It is calledbilateral knee replacement. Two knees. At the same time. Usually, it is performed by one surgeon; at times it is done simultaneously by two surgeons. And it is a massive trend in knee replacement nowadays. We discuss the merits of doing two knee replacements at once below. And we have included the stories of a few recent bilateral knee patients to help you decide if you want one lump or two.

Some orthopedic surgeons simply will not perform two knee replacements at once, preferring at least a three-month separation between surgeries. Many suggest that age, physical health, and mindset play a role in the final outcome. And that recovery is more demanding for two knees vs. one. There is also evidence that younger patients have a harder time recovering in the short-term, only to do well over the long-term. Other surgeons agree to perform double replacements knowing that it can be better for the patient to just get it done at once so they can get back to their lives more quickly.

The problem is that with this seemingly irreversible trend toward doubles, patient results have suffered. Lisa Alarcon, Director of Physical Therapy at Michigan VNA notes that if your knees are bad enough so that one knee cannot really support all of your weight then go ahead and do them both. She also suggests that for rehabilitation, bilateral surgery has it advantages in that you cannot cheat when you are doing your rehab exercises because both knees are in recovery. Patients with two knee replacements at once can do very well in rehab because of this balanced recovery. Of course, there is double the danger of succumbing to scar tissue before you can get to a good range of motion. Lisa discusses the dangers of scar tissuehere.

I recently took a look at astudyon bilateral knee replacement surgery published by Hospital for Special Surgery, where much of the pioneering behind knee replacement was done. I was surprised at what I found. The number of bilateral total knee replacements performed between 1999 and 2008 increased by 75%. In 1999 bilateral procedures accounted for 3.7% of all knee replacement operations. By 2008 they accounted for 6% of operations. The average age for bilateral surgeries during that same time frame decreased by 2.5 years.

However the rate of comorbidities (the presence of one or more additional disorders) increased measurably during this time frame. More complications and difficulties were seen for those with two knee replacements. Here is an article that discusses the fact that there can be twice the complications for bilateral patient vs. single knee patients: HSS Article

Clouding matters further was the fact that obesity increased by 131% during this time frame. It is all related as the number one cause for knee replacement surgery is obesity. Dr. Stavros Memtsoudis, the highly respected orthopedic surgeon who oversaw the study, said patients should critically look at themselves and talk to their physicians about how their health status plays into the choice of surgery.

I found at least five people (friends) who had one knee done but never went back for the second one because the pain, in their judgment, was so bad, said Ed. Ed feels that the mental preparation is just as important as the physical preparation prior to TKA. Eds surgeon, Dr. Ward, was willing to preform a bilateral knee replacement in part because of Eds commitment and dedication to preparing himself for success. He knew Ed was going to work very hard before and after his surgery.

Mike was walking to the mailbox in about eight days, and picking weeds in the garden. He was back to work in a warehouse lifting 300 lb. boxes within three months of his bilateral surgery. Mike was athletic and in shape before he went ahead with his surgery, and he was 52 at the time of the operation. You can view a full interview with Mikehere. Mikes surgeon, Dr. Gibson, was very impressed with his progress as was his recovery team at the outpatient clinic where he finished his recuperation three weeks early. His mailbox story is presented here.

Steve had complications in surgery (a fractured tibia!) which slowed his recovery from two knee replacements. He still achieved 127 and 135 range of motion on his knees after six weeks. His recovery progressed at a steady pace once his leg healed. You are unlikely to see better numbers than these especially after such an episode.

It was the single rehabilitation period that made up Steves mind for him. Before going ahead with two knee replacements at once he consulted with a friend who recovered well from her double. If she could do it, then I could, Steve said. He wanted to get it over with. Steve really warmed up to the idea when his surgeon,Dr. Brian McCardel, had no qualms about performing both surgeries in one four hour time frame. Steve sorted out a recovery plan with the latest in rehab technology. He never looked back, very pleased that he went forward with his own double.

Betsy reached 110 range of motion in two weeks one each of her two knee replacements. In her early 50s, she is athletic, playing tennisand volleyball. Once she got going on her recovery in her own home, after a week in a skilled nursing facility, she really took off. Knee replacement has a major impact on everyone who goes through it. In Betsys case the implications were huge. Two knees are the difference between actually living, and just hobbling through life. As an entrepreneurshe needed a quick recovery to get back to business.

Regarding her recovery, I basically am a big chicken, claims Betsy. I thought that once I went through all that pain for one knee replacement I would not want to go through it again. She did not want to devote more than six months of her life to have both knees replaced one after the other.

Her surgery was performed by Drs.Lederman and Kwartowitzwho usedConforMISknee hardware. Betsy is glad that she went ahead with two knee replacements at once. She was soon back to tennis and living a very full life in Naples, Florida.

In the spring of 2018 Ray Natili, an NCAA basketball official, went ahead with both knees at once for a very specific reason. He had to be back on the courts, performing at the highest athletic level, within six (6) months. He would never have done it any other way as you can see in his interview below. This fall Ray will be the first NCAA basketball referee to return to his job on the courts after a bilateral knee replacement.

On my visit with Dr Winakur I said, Look, I know I cant have a knee replacement, but if theres something else I can do And he had taken my x-ray and he says, oh no, you are a candidate. If you want a knee replacement you just let me know, And I said, you know what? Im done. Im done being this constrained at this age. I want to be able to be more active and just walk my dog pain-free.

Plenty of patients do their knees one after another, thereby not putting all the pressure on themselves at once. In fact this is much more common that bilateral surgery even with the trends toward bilateral that we are observing. Jeff in Michigan did just that and completed a 5K within two months of his second TKA. From first TKA to 5K it was six (6) months. And if you ask Jeff he would say that he did it the right way. One knee did recover faster than the other, but he got there all the same. And for those whos health is not as good or do not have enough support at home for a more demanding recovery it can be the best option.

Dave had a scare on the day he got home from surgery. His heart rate was elevated and the nurse sent him right back to the hospital for three days. These are crucial days for recovery and have really compromised the recoveries of many patients. The first week of recovery is the most important and Dave found himself behind. With the help of his wife Carol Jean he caught up and was a full range of motion by four weeks post surgery. Dave and Carol Jean moved to Naples, FL. Dave now plays golf four days a week on some of the best golf courses in the nation.

It is common knowledge for those who do two knee replacements at once, that knees often recover each at a slightly different pace from the other. With double the surgery can come a lower risk of infection which is a knee patients greatest risk from knee surgery. Also note that surgeons use different tools on each knee and that you could be infected in one knee but not the other. You will need more care at the very beginning after a double, which sometimes puts people in skilled nursing facilities after their surgery. That means not recovering in the comfort of your own home; generally not as good for a fast recovery. We know that recovery from skilled nursing facilities is highly variable. I know from personal experience with my patients how poor the results can be in these institutions. I advise that you avoid them if at all possible.

If you are planning on home care for your recovery, note that insurancecompanies do not double the number of weeks you have for home care with a bilateral surgery, rather you get twice the PT each day during your home care rehabilitation. Sub-optimal if you ask me. If you do two knees at once and go home you will need a trusted friend, spouse, caretaker to help you for 7-10 days.

Who knows if this trend toward bilateral knee replacement will continue. It may be that advances in rehabilitation will help doctors and patients succeed more often with two knee replacements at once.In the end, the patient and physician must make this decision together, keeping in mind the patients overall health, financial,and emotional condition. It takes real work to recover from a bilateral knee replacement. But many would say that its worth it.

If you are considering knee replacement (singular or bilateral) you owe it to yourself to explore the X10 Knee Recovery System for recovery from knee replacement in your home with the help of a Patient Coach and Physical Therapist. The X10 offers a pain-free recovery because its patented technology feels your knee and adjusts to you. And it shares your progress wirelessly with your surgeon so he or she can track your progress alongside you virtually. To learn more click here:The X10 Knee Recovery System.

In this one-of-a-kind blog, we gather together great thinkers, doers, writers related to Knee Surgery, Recovery, Preparation, Care, Success, and Failure. Meet physical therapists, coaches, surgeons, patients, and as many smart people as we can gather to create useful articles for you. Whether you have a surgery upcoming, in the rear-view mirror, or just want to take care of your knees to avoid surgery, you should find some value here. Executive Editor: PJ Ewing ([email protected])

PJ Ewing is the Chief Marketing Officer at X10 Therapy. He is also a Recovery Coach who has helped more than 350 knee patients recover from knee surgery to date. An active blogger on knee surgery and recovery, PJ is the chief editor of The X10 Meta-Blog, and is host and founder of The Bee's Knees Podcast. PJ is a graduate of The University of Michigan (BA) and Notre Dame University (MBA).

I am a 84 year old male who wants both knees replaced at the same time. I am having a hard time finding a Dr. to do both at the same time. I absolutely will not do it any other way. I live in a small town, Hemet, Ca. 92545. Can you help me.

I had a bilatetal knee replacement on May 8th, 2017. Two surgeons operating simultaneously. Best decision I ever made. I am close to being 8 months post op and my knees are so good I dont even remember most days I had it done. I busted my hump in physical therapy and it sure paid off. I golfed this summer and bowled. I also have been doing yoga and zumba now for awhile. Life is so good again! Love my new knees!

I am a 55 year old retired Veteran and want both knees done at the same time! Please help me find someone near me who will perform the surgery! I live in Corpus Christi but can travel if I need to in order to get it done! I am very active but the pain is really slowing me down.

I just had bi-lateral knee replacement December 11, 2017 with Dr. Kurt Merkel in St. Louis, MO. It turned out great. No infections, and my incisions have healed great. Im now using a cane & getting around more and more. Im returning to work March 5, 2018. I cant wait to share how Im doing 6 months from now. I hope that helped.

Since publishing this article the trend to bilateral knee surgery has intensified, and we continue to update this content to keep it current. As of this day patients from as far as Wyoming, Virginia, Tampa, New Hampshire, Arizona have gone to great lengths to get the X10 for their Bilateral Knee Surgery Recovery. As we grow we can serve more and more bilateral knee patients. And, in fact, our latest X10 machine is designed specifically for bilateral patients. Bring one, bring two knees were ready for you.

Health can be a factor when it comes to going forward with Bilateral TKA. I spoke with a patient recently who was planning on using the X10 for recovery even though his surgeon suggested he go into an in-patient rehab facility. for 7-10 days He is a healthy, active 65 year old with no co-morbidities (compromising complications). With the X10 it is no longer necessary for a bilateral knee patient to go to a rehab facility, rather you can go straight home and begin your rehab at once.

As noted in the extensive article here there are two sides to most arguments about a bilateral knee replacement. Sure there may be more pain, but dont they both hurt already if youre facing a replacement? It takes a lot of dedication to rehabbing when youre working on both knees at once, but it will be done in less time than one surgery after another. There is more trauma to the body at one time but you also only need to have one experience under anesthesia and one hospital stay.

Understanding these factors and having a conversation with your surgeon is imparitive to making the right choice for you. As noted here mental preparation is just as important as physical preparation when facing any knee replacement or 2.

If you have the support of a caregiver and are willing to discipline yourself to doing what it takes, you will more than likely be glad you decided to get 2 done at once. As an X10 recovery coach, Ive had the pleasure to experience the bi-lateral recovery with some very dedicated patients. None of my patients regretted their decision to have both done yet they admitted to being tired as it is hard work. However, dont be fooled, just 1 knee recovery is takes discipline and hard work. Fortunately, my patients had the good fortune to have the X10 tool and coaching support too to get them through.

My uncle has been worried that if he gets knee surgery, he will lose the ability to go weight lifting or walk easily on his leg. Your information that there was actually a patient who could walk in eight days and lift heavy boxes at work within three months is amazing. After hearing this, I think my uncle will feel a lot better about getting his knee replaced and will start looking into the procedure.

The two knee surgery is risky as compared to the single knee surgery. The two knee replacement is recommended to those who are physically fit, in good health and who are willing to undergo physiotherapy after surgery to regain the mobility. It require a care taker and strict schedule for the therapy. For more details, visit the website.

how long does it take to recover after double knee replacement surgery - ferguson action 2021

how long does it take to recover after double knee replacement surgery - ferguson action 2021

A double knee replacement is a surgical procedure designed to eliminate arthritis from the knee. The knee occurs when there is a loss of the cartilage in the knee. When the cartilage has worn away in both knees, an artificial knee can take its place. The knee replacement recreates to the normal function of the knee and its main reason is to relieve pain. It may also help to restore motion of both knees.

The knee will also be checked to make sure that all of the ligaments are stable around the knee. The knee is then brought through a full range of motion to make sure that the knee will come to full extension and able to fully flex.

A total knee replacement may be performed if there are signs of advanced joint disease and treatment has failed to provide pain relief. The pain will affect the patients quality of life. A patients age is also determining the factor to a knee replacement should be performed. It is preferred for a patients age in order to perform a total knee replacement.

There is no specific time in double knee replacement surgeries. The patients who have no other health issues, the main part of the recovery is done after eight weeks. Recovery depends on not only the success of the surgery but also the patients ability. Medications in controlling pain and preventing blood clots will also be given. Simple breathing exercises may be advised to help prevent congestion in the lungs.

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