hammer uses

types of hammers and their uses,parts of hammers

types of hammers and their uses,parts of hammers

Beforeknowingtypesofhammersand theirusesFirstof all,wehavetoknowpartsofhammers, So thatwecan better understand thetypesofhammersand theiruses. Hammer is a striking tool and it is mainly used in punching, bending, straightening, chipping, forging, riveting, etc. Hammer is often made of a drop forged carbon steel. Hammerisalsomadeofbrass and copper which isatypeof softhammer. Hammer handles are often made of wood which has capacity to absorb shock. So, without wasting of time let's know what is hammers, what are parts of hammers, how many types of hammers and their uses.

Thistypeofhammerismostlyusedin black smith forging to straighten round rods,ironbars,angle iron,channels, flatiron, etc. Its shape is similar to that of the double-ended hammer. As it isusedforheavyjobs,ithasahigherweightsuch as4kgto 10kg.

They are used to completely position the work in the machine vice, drive the mandrel or perform some other similar operation on which the work surface or its edge is damaged by hammering the steel hammer.

In this topic I discussed about what is hammers, what are parts of hammers, how many types of hammers and their uses. So, Ihopeyou all satisfied, if any query you cancommentor ask through mail. Thank You.

hammer drill uses. are hammer drills worth it?

hammer drill uses. are hammer drills worth it?

A power drill is a useful tool for tackling several tasks around the house. It can help you assemble furniture, hang pictures, and complete numerous household repairs. Hammer drills are a different option. It lets you put holes into a concrete wall, tackle hard surfaces, and handle similar installation needs.

Although some power tools such as the impact drivers come with a hammer-like feature, it is not necessarily the same as having an impact or percussion tool with a dedicated design for this work. You would use this option whenever extreme force is necessary to punch a hole into a hard surface.

Hammer drills are needed when boring a hole is necessary in a challenging material. Concrete, stones, bricks, masonry, ceramics, etc. are some of the tough materials that this tool can penetrate, allowing you to insert plugs, bolts, screws, and other items to create specific results.

Regular cordless drills struggle to penetrate concrete even if you use a masonry drill bit. Drilling into concrete is simple when you have a powerful hammer drill available. The tool is used for drilling concrete footings and floors to fit metal anchors and install wall frames.

Technically you could use a good cordless drill and a masonry bit to drill concrete. But regular drills do not have the sufficient torque to pierce concrete. This will cause frequent damages to the cutting edges of the bits and may result in overheating of the motor. Dried concrete is a very hard substance. In the Mohs scale, the hardness of concrete is rated as 5 to 7. This is as hard as hardened tool steel with which regular drill bits are made. Hence you need a masonry bit with tungsten carbide cutting tips which is harder than concrete.

After measuring and marking the surface, prepare to drill by setting the depth stop to 1/4-inch longer than your intended depth. If your tool doesnt have this feature, place some masking tape on the bit where you need the mark to be. Youll use a carbide masonry bit to drill the hole, using firm, but not heavy pressure to achieve a positive result. Do not apply excessive force; let the tool do its job.

If your Tapcon screw threads wont grip after drilling the concrete hole, use an anchor instead. It should be of the correct size to accommodate your hardware, which means you may need to expand your drilled hole a little to manage its width.

Drilling into brick isnt as challenging as it seems when you have a hammer drill available to take on this task. With the right tool, bit, and technique, it only takes a few minutes to complete the boring work.

Your task is to determine whether you should drill into the mortar or the brick. The latter holds more weight, but older masonry work may crumble when you create a hole for a deep anchor. Expansions could generate enough stress to trigger cracking.

Plumbers, electricians, and handymen use this power tool all the time to make holes in the walls to fit piping and wiring. Their work usually involves drilling pilot holes in bricks or cinder blocks for concrete lag screws to fix fittings on to the wall.

When drilling holes in metal, you dont need to use the hammering drill. In fact, trying to drill with hammering action will cause your drill bit to skate across the metal surface. So turn the mode switch to drill only mode and use the right drill bit.

I prefer to use HSS (High-Speed Steel) bits since they can retain the cutting edges longer than high carbon steel bits. Although some come with a titanium nitride coating to make the product last longer, the occasional work can use something standard. Black oxide or cobalt steel is also appropriate for a hammer drill going through metal.

Before you start the drilling process, it helps to punch the center (make a dimple) where you plan to work. The bits tend to wander with this material, which could cause damage to the products surface.

However, drilling through ceramic tile is tricky because the material can crack rather easily. When you need to put a hole in it to mount something, a 2-in-1 tool that lets you turn the hammering function off is the better choice. You would want to use a diamond or carbide abrasive-type bit to complete the work.

Its much easier to break or crack tile when using a hammer drill. Thats why it is more effective to use it as a demolition option instead of as an installation tool. Find out how to use a hammer drill for tile removal.

However, do not use a hammer drill to drill your granite and marble countertop. The percussive blows can result in developing cracks on your countertop. What you need in this case is a regular drill with a diamond core bit (hole saw) to cut holes in the granite countertop, ceramic tiles, etc.

Are you doing remodeling and want to tear down a section of your wall? Get a demolition hammer drill. Much like tile removal, SDS hammer drills equipped with chisel bits work great for demolition jobs. The demolition hammer is specifically designed for this job. While not as powerful as a jackhammer or a pavement breaker, the demo hammers are powerful enough to do most home improvement and reconstruction jobs. However, it cannot be used for drilling holes.

In case you need a tool that can drill holes as well as break masonry, then get a rotary or combi hammer drill. See the difference between demolition hammer vs. rotary hammer vs. combination hammer here.

You can even use a hammer drill as a regular drill if it comes with a standard drill mode. That means you can have the versatility of an everyday tool while having the extra power available when you need it the most.

different types of hammers and their uses | car bibles

different types of hammers and their uses | car bibles

To say that the hammer is one of the most essential tools on the planet is an understatement. Anyone who has ever fixed, created, repaired, shaped, broken, split, or even fabricated something will say that they needed a hammer at some point in their jobs. From driving nails into the wood to breaking hard materials like rocks and even prying some stubborn nails from their attachment, hammers can do a lot of the things that your bare hands simply cannot do. The key, however, is using the right type of hammer for the job. That is why beginning handymen and DIYers should pay attention to the different types of hammers and how each one is used.

Everyone should have a claw hammer. It is a multi-purpose hammer that comes with a flat head intended for driving materials like nails and a claw that is perfect for prying nails and other objects. If one has to look at it carefully, the claw hammer is like a combination of a mallet and a crowbar. The face is perfect for driving nails, breaking hard objects, and even flattening certain materials like galvanized iron sheets. The claw or crowbar attachment is great for prying nails off wood and other surfaces. As such, it can also be used for separating two objects like two pieces of wood joined together by a nail. The claw hammer is typically used by those in the carpentry and woodwork industries, although electricians can also have their very own special kind of claw hammer.

This type of hammer has a long handle, a mild face, and a really heavy head which is generally used for driving extra-long nails into very thick materials like lumber. It is commonly used in the framing of houses; hence, the name. Unfortunately, the introduction of the nail gun has somehow seen the limited use of the framing hammer in many construction projects.

When it comes to metalwork, craftsmen and engineers always go for a ball peen hammer. It looks like your claw hammer, except that the claw is replaced by a round-shaped or ball-like peen or pein. This is used in shaping and setting of rivets, rounding of the edges of fasters and metal pins, and expanding copper covers. The ball-peen hammer can also be used for peening welded metals. It is for this reason that the ball peen or ball pein hammer is also known as the machinists hammer. Interestingly, this type of hammer can also be used in chiseling.

This is similar to the ball peen hammer, except that the ball is replaced with a straighter pein. Smaller cross peen hammers are generally used in driving nails without ever worrying about whacking your fingers while holding the nail in place. As such, these are also used in driving tacks. Heavier versions of the cross and straight peen hammer are used in the shaping of metals, just like the ball peen.

Not everyone considers the joiners mallet to be a hammer since the materials used in its construction is a bit different. Whereas conventional hammers are made of solid steel or metal, a joiners mallet will have a wooden head that is mated to a handle. This type of hammer is often used by carpenters and joiners especially when joining two pieces of wood together. Since the mallet also comes with a solid block of wood as the driver, it does not damage the surface of the wood that is being joined. It can also be used in knocking dowels and for driving a chisel.

The club hammer looks like the gavel on a judges desk, although this one is definitely made of sturdier and heavier materials. This type of hammer typically has a dual face on its head and mated to a relatively short handle usually made of hickory wood or synthetic resin. The club hammer is used in light demolition work as it can easily break masonry or any other structure that needs bashing. You can look at it as the little brother of a sledgehammer and is very common those in construction projects. By the way, the club hammer is also called the lump hammer.

This has got to be the heaviest and toughest hammer on the planet. The sledgehammer is the big brother of the lump or club hammer with a long handle to allow for a maximum force that comes with a full swing. Some can be as heavy as 14 lbs and are typically used in moderate to heavy demolition work; although getting a jackhammer would definitely be better. This hammer is generally used for breaking up concrete, stones, rocks, and masonry. If these materials need further breaking, the club hammer is used.

These are mallet-like sledges that are specifically used in partial demolitions. Maximum force can be delivered to the material without necessarily damaging the surface. Deadblows will only break the surface that it strikes on. You wont see any cracks or visible damage in the surrounding areas. This is made possible by the unique design of the deadblow sledgehammer. Inside the head are steel fragments or lead shots that distribute power with each blow. The energy is transmitted only to a specific area of the material being hit. Because of these fragments, hammer rebound is also minimized.

Another type of sledgehammer is the machinist. It is usually smaller than a typical sledgehammer having only an 11-inch long handle. However, what makes it unique is the head. One face is square and is ideal for bashing or breaking other materials. On the opposite face is a downward angled steelhead. This hammer face is typically indicated in striking objects as well as splitting them more like an ax.

This hand tool may have a shorter handle than its counterparts, but it sure is a lot heavier than most. On the average, the German sledgehammer tips the scale at 23 pounds. But the most striking feature of this type of sledgehammer is its more pronounced rectangular face. Because of the larger surface area of the hammer face, you will only need a few swings and blows with this hammer to drive an object. This sledgehammer can also come in custom versions. Some can be coated with non-sparking, anti-corrosive, or non-magnetic materials allowing them to be used in high-risk work environments.

The lightest among sledgehammers, the soft steel hammer is defined by thinner yet longer handles that can be as long as 3 feet. Soft steel sledgehammers typically weigh about 10 lbs, allowing them to be used in jobs that require minimal to no shearing. The handle on the soft steel hammer can be made of either wood, mostly hickory, or fiberglass.

If youre into cabinetry or any other type of woodwork or carpentry that requires finesse in terms of not damaging the elegant and beautiful surface of the wood, youll definitely want to get a lathe or soft-faced hammer. This is designed specifically to deliver blows to any material without causing damage to the material being hit; well, at least not extensively. The reason why they call it the soft-faced hammer is because the face is not really as hard like metal or steel. Most lathe hammers come with either firm or soft rubber face, although there are also options for a plastic or copper face. There are also lathe hammers that come with interchangeable faces so you can always put on the face that is ideal for the job.

You may have already seen geologists and even a few archeologists use this type of hammer. It looks more like a modified pickaxe, but with a flat face opposite the pointed end. Geologists call it the geological hammer, although common folks refer to it as the rock pick. As you can perhaps imagine, the geologist hammer is specially designed to break rocks or even split them apart. Its an invaluable tool for examining the composition, nature, mineralogy, orientation, and strength of rocks. These hammers also uncover fossilized remains.

Craftsmen in metal shops or those who love to fabricate metal objects especially aluminum always include a blocking hammer in their toolbox. These hammers come with an extra-large, square-shaped face that block or shape sheet metal before such material becomes permanently flattened. The large surface area of the face allows for the more efficient, almost blemish-free finish on metal works. The blocking hammer is a specialty hand tool so you really dont expect this to be included in your garage toolbox or cabinet unless youre planning on doing some serious metal work.

As you may have guessed from the name itself, a roofers hammer is perfect for cutting, tripping, and snipping every single type of roofing shingle you may have on your roof. The head is typically made of solid steel while the handle comes with nylon vinyl material to help improve its grip. Majority of roofers hammers come with a fully-retractable cutting blade which further extends its versatility.

One can look at the scaling hammer as the heavy-duty equivalent of a scraper. It still retains a flat face that is ideal for driving nails or even flattening and shaping certain materials. This type of hammer is what you will use to remove coats of paint, rust, and other materials or substances that may have accumulated on any surface. There are two fundamental types of scaling hammers: regular and heavy-duty. The latter is primarily intended for scaling, scraping, or removing really thick materials. Because of the unique design of the face, scaling hammers are also used in caulking, chipping, scrape-cleaning, casting and billet, removal of paint coats, and the removal of rust.

As the name suggests, upholstery hammers are used in securing upholstery materials into the frame of an object, usually a piece of furniture. Nails and tacks are often used in such work. Also called the tack hammer, upholstery hammers come with a magnetized face allowing for the stacking of tacks and driving them into place. Unfortunately, with the advent of automated hammers and staple guns, it is very rare to find someone still using an upholstery hammer. It would still be a nice piece to have, though, if youre more into simple, non-mechanized tools.

Folks in construction sites or those working with bricks and other similar materials often need a tool that will allow them to easily cut these materials in half or even quarters with greater precision. In woodwork, carpenters use a chisel. In brickwork, that job falls to the Scutch hammer. This hammer comes with a wedge that can have single or double grooves allowing for more precise cuts and better control.

This type of hammer comes in two kinds. One is the rubber mallet that works more like a dead blow sledgehammer in that it will not create significant damage to the surface of the material that is being hit. It is generally used in knocking away massive blocks or slabs of concrete. The other type of brick and mortar hammer is the brick hammer. These hammers are known as chippers instead of full demolition hammers. The brick hammer is intended for chipping away at masonry in a gradual, more controlled manner.

A drywall hammer is a lightweight hand tool, no more than 13 ounces in weight that is ideal for working on drywall. The design of the striking face helps prevent impact dents on the surface of drywall which is typically seen in hammers with square-shaped faces.

There are hundreds of other types of the hammer that are typically named after the professions or the functions in which they serve. For instance, you may have an electricians hammer or even a welders hammer. Suffice it to say, theres a hammer for every job on the planet. Picking the right one is, therefore, crucial to getting the job done right.

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what is a ball peen hammer used for? (ball peen uses) - working the flame

what is a ball peen hammer used for? (ball peen uses) - working the flame

If you are a new smith with few tools, you can use a heavy ball peen hammer as your main forging hammer. The flat face is appropriate for most beginner level projects and you should have no problem using the flat face to work a variety of techniques.

Ball peen hammers are easy to find at low prices. Most yard sales and flea markets will have a few to choose from. You can also find them at hardware stores and online if you are willing to pay full price.

This type of hammer is definitely not required in the workshop, but is handy to have for spreading metal quickly and evenly. If you predict that you will do this type of work often, a ball peen hammer might be a worthwhile investment.

Its worth noting that you will use a ball peen hammer far more if you are a silversmith or coppersmith. Blacksmiths work with harder metal and usually seek to leave as few hammer marks on their finished work as possible. Those working with soft metals like silver and copper utilize a ball peen hammer to achieve a decorative texture on the surface of their finished product.

40 different types of hammers and their uses (with pictures)

40 different types of hammers and their uses (with pictures)

One of the oldest tools, the hammer has evolved to fill a wide variety of roles beyond simple construction. Some types of hammers are highly specialized, and may perform tasks traditionally held by axes. Other types are versatile and have a home in any workshop.

The parts of a hammer can be broken down into three main components. The head is not only the part you whack things with, but also includes the portion that fits over the handle and serves as the fulcrum on a claw hammer when pulling nails.

Used primarily by engineers, the pein of this hammer is rounded. Its commonly used for rounding the edges of metal pins and fasteners, closing rivets, and shaping metal. In past, it was a key tool used for a fabrication method called peening.

Perhaps the most recognizable of all hammers, the back of a claw hammer features a curved, forked claw that can grip nail heads, allowing the user to lever out nails. This hammer is so versatile that it can be found in any home or workshop. Seeour favorite claw hammers.

Often referred to as a drilling hammer or lump hammer, this tool has a short, double-faced head similar to that of a sledge hammer. While not well-suited for commercial work, the club hammer is useful for driving steel chisels and masonry heads, as well as light demolition work.

The most common type of mallet, its rubber head allows for softer blows. It can be used on sheet metal, in woodworking and upholstery, and is gentle enough to force plasterboard into place without damaging it.

This long-handled hammer has a metal double-head similar to a mallet, but designed for heavy, large blows. It can be used for driving stakes, or breaking up concrete and masonry, making it a popular demolition tool.

This unusual hammer features two long, claw-like heads, one of which is magnetised. It is often referred to as an upholstery hammer, and is designed to hold a tack for placement using the magnetic end, then driving the placed tack using the non-magnetised end.

You will likely never see some of these hammers. Many are used for very specific tasks and not commonly found in general-purpose hardware stores. A few of these hammers closely resemble more common hammers, except for weight and slight size or shape differences.

Unlike what is depicted in popular fantasy games, the blacksmiths hammer is a type of sledge hammer where the second head is slightly tapered and rounded. It is designed specifically for shaping red-hot steel against an anvil.

The claw of a bricklayers hammer doubles as a chisel for scoring, while the narrow head is capable of splitting bricks. This makes the hammer very useful in bricklaying and masonry projects. Also referred to as a masonry hammer.

This straight peen hammer has a very specialized end that more closely resembles a hatchet with a notch in the bottom. The notch is used for holding nails in place without damaging the drywall paper, and the blade of the pein can be used to chop off excess bits of drywall safely.

The engineers hammer was traditionally used for locomotive repair and features a rounded head and cross peen. The term is also commonly associated with heavier ball peen hammers and hammers which have a rounded double head.

One of the more unusual types of hammer, the hatchet hammer (sometimes referred to as a half-hatchet) has an axe blade instead of a peen. It can be used for a variety of tasks and is thus well-suited for survival and emergency toolkits.

The head of this traditional mallet is made of a solid, slightly tapered wood block instead of metal. It can be used for driving chisels or gently tapping wood joints together without marring the surface.

Sometimes referred to as a body mechanics hammer, this hammer features a flat head and a long pein tipped with a conical die. It is used with a dolly (a curved type of anvil) to remove dents in car panels.

While not technically a hammer, a nail gun (or nailer) does the same main job as a claw or framing hammer. It drives nails into wood or other material usually by way of compressed air (pneumatic). While less common, cordless, battery powered versions are also available.

Also known as a rock climbing hammer, the straight pein of this hammer contains a hole for removing pitons. The head may be anvil style and heavy or lighter with a hollow handle, depending upon the type of rock climbing intended.

Heavier models will drive more pitons quickly with less fatigue, but lighter models are used when driving fewer pitons to reduce weight loads. Many piton hammers have interchangeable heads to allow for a wider range of climbing methods.

These hammers have a slightly convex head and a pein tipped with a cylindrical die. It is used for fine-shaping and smoothing metal over a planishing stake, allowing the metal to take the shape of the stakes head.

This is the professionals answer to a claw hammer, featuring a straight claw instead of curved and heavier weight. It can be used to rip apart materials during construction and demolition (hence the name).

Also referred to as a pick hammer, this small tool has a flat head and either a chisel or pick on the back. They are most commonly used in geology and historical excavation to break small rocks. The chisel is used for a variety of tasks, including splitting soft rock, removing vegetation, and creating small holes.

Featuring a vertical chisel and pick instead of normal heads, these hammers are used for removing scale, rust, and various types of hard coating from boilers and other surfaces. Pneumatic versions range from single-headed to triple-headed models and function more like a jackhammer.

These long-handled hammers are used for driving railroad spikes from the opposite side of the tracks. The two heads are long and thin, being either symmetrical or (more commonly) with one end being longer and thinner than the other.

This masons variant of a sledge hammer is specially designed for breaking up stone and concrete. Instead of a double-head, the striking face is oval, and the short straight peen functions as a napping face for making scoring lines.

Perhaps one of the most unusual looking hammers, the toolmakers hammer has a ball pein and rounded head. The central portion of the head contains a magnifying glass. It is used for performing delicate work in machine shop.

Trim hammers have a straight claw and are smaller than normal claw hammers. Sometimes referred to as a finish hammer, these have a smooth face for driving trim nails without damaging the surrounding surface.

Its handle has an unusual spiral design that looks more like a spring. This helps dissipate heat, while the hammer itself us used to remove slag from welding points once the weld bead has had a chance to cool.

I have a little hammer one face of which is like a panel pin hammer and the other is bullet shaped. I have no idea what it is for, probably weighs 2-3 ounces. Any ideas ? mine was it might be for small rivets, but they make 2 oz ball peins !

55 types of hammers - the ultimate guide - engineeringclicks

55 types of hammers - the ultimate guide - engineeringclicks

When we use the term hammer we all know what to expect, what they are used for but do you realise how many types of hammers there are and their crucial design elements? In its most basic form you can describe your hammer as a handheld tool which is simply used to strike another object. The first hammers date back to 2,400,000 BC when stones were used as the hammerheads then we have the first real modern day hammer with stones attached to sticks via strips of leather and animal sinew (dating back to 30,000 BC). However, it was only really in the Bronze Age that we saw the creation of the hammers styles which we see today and often take for granted.

There is historical evidence to suggest that bronze/copper hammerheads were used around 3,000 BC in an area of the world we now know as Iraq. In reality this was the first major breakthrough in the design of the modern day hammerhead allowing for much tougher materials to be used in construction. Indeed archaeological digs from 200 BC show that the ingenious Romans had created a range of different types of hammerhead with even a claw hammer dating back to 75 AD discovered during Roman settlement digs.

By very definition, the fact that a claw hammer was available in Roman times would seem to indicate that metal nails were also a common construction tool. What we see today is very often taken for granted but we do know that the range of modern day hammers can be traced back thousands of years.

While there are many different variations on the traditional hammer they all have two main components which are the head and the handle. The shape, size and material used for each of these elements will vary depending upon their use. Believe it or not the force created by a hammer blow is directly proportional to the weight of the hammerhead, the length of the hammer handle, the force with which it is driven down (or up) and good old-fashioned gravity. We take many things for granted in the modern world but the ability to balance good old-fashioned brute force together with accuracy is not easy.

Can you imagine the individual force drawn down upon a hammerhead not to imagine the cumulative force over the life of a hammerhead? These elements of the hammer are created during a process called hot forging which sees a steel bar heated to temperatures approaching 2350F (1300C). This process softens the steel bars which can then be manipulated into the shape of a hammerhead using an array of dies. One of the dies is static while another is brought down with force creating immense pressure which moulds the molten steel into the required shape.

This is repeated numerous times eventually, bit by bit, creating the finished article. As you might expect when excess molten steel is forced out of the dies it can form what is known as flash which is effectively unwanted steel compromising the shape of the hammerhead. This flash has to be removed using trimming dies which clamp the desired shape cutting off the excess material due to the enormous force at which the dies are brought together. As a final quality check each hammerhead is cooled and any rough spots are removed manually.

When you bear in mind the excessive force which a hammerhead will experience during its lifetime you might suspect this is not the end of the process. In order to prevent chipping and damage to the hammerhead, which takes the full force of the kinetic energy created by downforce, the hammerheads are heated and then cooled very quickly which changes the structure of the steel material. This ensures that the impact area has a different type of grain to the rest of the hammerhead and will not be compromised when used.

The final process is known as shot blasting which cleans and smooths the hammerheads using small steel particles which are fired at great speed effectively smoothing the outer surface. Hey presto, the hammerhead is finished and can be painted and polished.

The most common types of hammer handles are wood and metal with the wood type simply shaved into the desired shape on a lathe. After this process the wooden handle is clamped and a diagonal slot created at the top which is where the hammerhead and handle will be united. The process for a metal hammer handle is very similar to the creation of the hammerhead with steel bars heated to extreme temperatures and molten steel forced into shaped dies. Other materials can be added to the centre of the hammers to give greater strength and longevity.

Once the hammer handles have been completed the wooden type is secured using wedges and steel pins with the metal handles connected using epoxy resin. The finished product will then be examined both from a visual point of view and tested for quality control. While all elements of the hammer making process are important it is the hardening of the impact area which is perhaps most vital from a safety point of view as well as value for money for customers.

So simple yet so effective it is no surprise that the claw hammer is perhaps the most widely used hammer today. Popular in the construction industry and DIY market the hammerhead is specifically curved with one side used to hammer nails into a material while the other side, split head, is used to extract nails.

Often referred to as a stonemasons hammer the brick hammer is designed to act as both a traditional hammer and a simple chisel tool. The blunt end of the hammer is used to split stones and hard masonry while the chisel shape can be used to round off the edges and smaller pieces of stone.

It is quite easy to confuse the framing hammer with a simple claw hammer but there are some subtle differences. The framing hammer is much heavier, around double the weight of a traditional claw hammer, and designed to bring down extreme force on large nails. The much longer handle together with the gripped impact head ensure less slippage when hammering in large nails. The claw element is also straight as opposed to curved with more focus on separating materials such as skirting boards, etc as opposed to extracting nails.

While hammer welding itself may be an art form which is fast disappearing from the modern day world, a welders hammer is a very useful reminder of days gone by. This particular tool is used to remove waste material from round a weld with both a pointed tool and a chisel tool on either side of the hammerhead.

While many different hammers are perfectly refined replicas of the traditional claw hammer there are some subtle differences. The so-called electricians hammer has the claw tool at a different angle and a polished tempered steel head for impact force. The handle is made of high strength fibreglass which is able to absorb the shock of multiple impacts.

The drywall hammer is an innovative tool which is perhaps a lot more useful than it looks at first glance. The traditional impact head is bevelled with a waffle shape allowing you to hammer in nails on a drywall without breaking the outer layer. It also adds a bevelled effect to the wall which can be useful when adding new layers of plaster, etc. The other side of the hammerhead has a simple nail extractor, an axe-shaped sharpened edge for scoring and a useful hook to allow multiple people to carry strips of drywall using their hammers.

A soft face hammerhead is made of non-ferrous materials such as wood, plastic and is very basic with two impact areas and a shaft which is often made of wood, rubber or fibreglass. The soft materials used reduce what is known as bounceback as they are able to absorb the vast majority of the impact energy. In many ways they are a smaller version of the traditional mallet but for use in more delicate situations.

The tack hammer is used when securing upholstery using either small nails or specialist tacks. The two sides of the hammerhead can vary between the traditional smaller impact area and one which is magnetised for help in positioning the tack or a small nail remover similar to a claw hammer. These hammers are relatively small and perfect for delicately securing upholstery.

The sledgehammer does not need much introduction! With a relatively large head and extended handle it is possible to gain significant impact speed which is perfect for tasks such as breaking rocks and driving fence posting into the ground. The hammerhead is larger than normal, traditionally made of metal and can take extreme impact force.

The blacksmiths hammer has an interesting history all of its own which goes back many centuries. Effectively it is designed for multipurpose forging allowing a blacksmith to bend and chip away at extremely hot metal materials to create a specific product. This is a specialist tool and is not designed for traditional use.

A bushing hammer in its simplest form is a vital masonry tool which allows stone and concrete to be texturised. These tools have an array of small pyramid-like designs on the hammerhead which imprint onto the concrete and stone. They are used for decorative purposes or to allow greater traction/adhesion were further work may be required.

The linemans hammer is traditionally associated with the task of hammering bolts or large screws into materials such as utility poles. It may appear very slight in structure and design but the principle is the same with two rounded hammerheads and a handle designed to absorb shock often enhanced by rubber grips.

As you might guess, the mechanics hammer is instrumental when looking to remove dents from car panels. The design is very different to a traditional hammer with a metal flat hammerhead complemented by a pointed impact tool. Watching a mechanic remove dents from a car panel is a joy and an art in itself.

The design of a chasing hammer is very different from your traditional hammer with a long rounded handle and a hammerhead which consists of a flat impact area and a ball-peen. Used traditionally with metalwork and riveting it offers a good mix of good old fashioned force as well as the ball-peen tool used to sink rivets flat with the surface.

Also referred to as a machinist hammer the ball-peen hammer is used in metalworking offering a relatively small hammerhead with a flat impact area and a rounded head tool. This is one of many hammers used for tasks such as riveting, offering a one stop tool to punch the rivet into the metal and round it off.

Forged out of one piece of metal the tinners hammer is predominantly used in the metal roofing industry. The hammerhead consists of a slightly bevelled flat head as well and a rounded cross peen. This is perfect for hammering rivets into the roofing and sinking them with the rounded edge.

More commonly associated with geologists the prospectors hammer offers both a flat edge hammerhead to break stones and a chiselled type tool for more intricate work. These are the type of hammers you see in films where experts are digging for fossils. They make that breaking and chiselling look so easy!

While obviously associated with toolmakers, the toolmakers hammer is also be used in a variety of other environments. While the handle can vary in size and material the hammerhead is exactly the same with a flat impact area and a rounded tool. This is complemented by a magnifying lens placed just below the hammerhead creating an eye catching look.

Commonly referred to as a type of mallet the dead-blow hammer is perfect for use in relatively tight spaces. It is designed to minimise any damage on the contact area with minimal rebound also assisting where space is at a premium. Consisting of two identical hammerhead tools this type of hammer can be used for a variety of different tasks.

The railroad-spike maul hammer is a precision made tool used to hammer railroad spikes onto railroad track. The hammerhead itself is relatively thin as is the hammer handle although the design, length of the handle and the hammerhead allow for maximum impact force.

As the name suggests, the stone sledgehammer is traditionally used to break giant rocks into more manageable pieces. The long handle and relatively small head are perfect when looking to create maximum impact force where precision is not necessarily vital. This is the type of hammer which depends upon brute force.

Like many blacksmiths tools the blacksmiths sledgehammer goes back many years and is used to shape pieces of metal such as iron. The large flat metal head and extended handle allow the creation of significant impact force. While there is an emphasis on brute force to shape different pieces of metal there is also a need for precision impact.

The half-hatchet hammer is simply a cross between an axe and a hammer affording the user a variety of different options. Sometimes referred to as a rigging axe it can be used in a number of different everyday scenarios.

As the name suggests, a trim hammer is more delicate than a traditional nail hammer. These hammers are compact and lightweight and are very popular within the carpentry industry. The polished steel head and smooth texture do not mark the surface when hammering nails flush.

The club hammer is a small version of a sledgehammer where brute force is required to break down masonry, stones and demolition work. It can also be used as an impact tool where you are looking to cut stone/hard metal with a chisel where perhaps precision is not required.

The name gives it away because a boiler scaling hammer is a vital element of the toolkit of fitters and welders. The hammerhead is made of a hardened metal with both a horizontal and vertical chisel head which is perfect for the removal of scale from boiler plates. It can also be used in other scenarios.

Sometimes referred to as a rock climbing hammer the piton hammer is similar in design to a basic metal spike which can be driven into small cracks and crevices as rock climbers ascend a rock face. They may have been around many years but they offer a solid anchor and are one of the most important climbing aids.

The scutch hammer is used in the construction industry, specifically for cutting and chiselling bricks, but this is not your stereotypical hammer. The hammer comes with either a single ended or double ended scutch which allows specific cutting attachments to be used.

The gavel hammer has a history which goes back centuries allowing those in control to attract the attention of the crowds. Commonly used by auctioneers, judges and at public meetings this small compact hardwood hammer can certainly demand control of any room!

Sometimes described as a rubber mallet, a rubber hammer is an extremely important tool where there is a requirement for soft but firm blows. This type of hammer is commonly used in upholstery, woodwork and those working with sheet metal. The fact that the rubber head causes minimal damage also makes this a perfect type of hammer when forcing material such as plasterboard into place.

We see a number of hammers which are used in the blacksmith trade and the blocking hammer is one more to add to the list. While the wooden handle is traditional, this hammer has a flat square head on one side and a cylindrical shaped head on the other. When shaping metal on either an anvil or a block the blocking hammer is the perfect tool.

As the name suggest, the brass hammer has a brass cylindrical double head which is perfect for hammering steel pins into different materials without damaging the surrounding area. While useful in an array of different scenarios, it is most often used in the automotive industry and traditional woodwork shops.

The cross peen hammer consists of a traditional hammerhead together with a wedge shaped alternative. Those who have hit their fingers when trying to position a panel pin or tack into wood or plasterboard for example will appreciate this hammer. The wedge side allows you to start the pin or tack without risk of damaging your finger. The traditional hammerhead allows you to finish the job.

The cross peen pin hammer is a smaller version of the cross peen hammer which is more appropriate for wood and not suitable for metal and other hard materials. It has the same small traditional hammerhead and wedge head and is used more for light joinery and intricate cabinetwork. The relatively light nature of the cross peen pin hammer makes it ideal for relatively soft materials.

The engineering hammer is a hard wearing durable tool which has traditionally been used for locomotive repairs and other similar activities. It has a rounded head and a cross peen which makes it ideal for particularly difficult repairs. The term is also used to describe ball peen hammers and rounded double head hammers.

The hatchet hammer is a hybrid between a hammer and an axe. The axe blade is used like a traditional axe but also has a traditional hammerhead on the opposite side. In theory there are numerous situations in which the hatchet hammer will come in useful but they are most often associated with survival/emergency situations. The ability to cut with the axe and also hammer in a traditional manner has saved many lives over the years.

A planishing hammer is a relatively small hammer which is traditionally used to fine shape and smooth metal. It consists of two similar hammerheads one of which is slightly convex and the other has a peen tip with a cylindrical die. Due to the shape of the hammerheads in is possible to exert significant force with limited damage to the metal itself.

As the name suggest, a power hammer is able to exert immense pressure using compressed air which is used to power a large piston. The hydraulic system is perfect for shaping steel and other similar types of material which are less malleable with more traditional manual hammers. When you consider that the piston head can move up and down anything up to 200 times as a minute you begin to appreciate the potential power.

As the name suggest, the Rip hammer is not only used in construction but also extremely popular in demolition. Described by some as the professionals answer to a claw hammer, it is heavier in weight and the claw component is straight as opposed to curved on a traditional claw hammer. This has to be one of the more durable hammers used extensively in construction/demolition for actions such as digging holes to demolishing wood and brickwork.

A rock hammer is traditionally used in the field of geology and excavation. It offers the opportunity to not only chisel out stones and bricks but also break small rocks with the flathead. Weve also seen variations of the rock hammer used by bricklayers to loosen and part brick work joints. Due to the length of the pick hammer it has also proven useful when digging small holes.

The scaling hammer is a rather strange looking tool consisting of a vertical chisel and pick. This type of hammer is extremely useful when removing not only scale and rust but also extremely hard coatings from inside boilers which can build up over the years. The relatively thin points allow you to get under the surface of the scaling/rust and draw it out.

The shingle hammer is a hybrid of various hammers and often referred to as a roofing hammer. It has a spike head and a square head and usually incorporates a small claw for pulling out nails. The spike is used to create nail holes in shingle and slate which will often shatter and break when using a traditional hammer. Once the hole is made the square head is used to push the nail through the slate/shingle and position it on a roof or similar structure.

This is a hammer which is traditionally used to force spikes into the ground which hold train rails in place. There are two types of spike maul hammer one of which has a square tapered head which complements the main driving block. There is also a bell variation with long thin cylindrical heads one of which is thicker and the other is longer. It is difficult to comprehend the tremendous workload required to lay track and to ensure that each spike is firmly in place.

The straight peen hammer is very similar to the cross peen variation and perfect for shaping metal and putting nails in place. The only difference to a cross peen hammer is the fact that the peen (the pointed end) is parallel with the hammer shaft as opposed to vertical. The size and variation of the peen can vary as can the block hammer end.

To all intents and purposes a knife edged hammer is very similar to an axe with a flat square hammerhead on the opposite side. Using the knife edge it is very easy to cut and split wood while the flat surface is useful when looking to bludgeon the wood. Softening the wood (or driving a wedge into the wood) and then splitting with the knife edge is a perfect combination.

Rock climbing hammers are also known as wall hammers, aid hammers and big wall hammers and play an integral part in rock climbing. They allow the climber to place and remove pitons, copper heads and fixed anchors. The sharp end of the hammerhead helps position/loosen the anchors (bolts) and the blunt end is perfect for hammering them home.

A splitting maul hammer is best described as a cross between a sledgehammer and an axe. The axe head comes to a sharp point and is used to split wood. The sledgehammer side of the hammerhead can be used to bludgeon the wood or more commonly to push a wedge as deep as possible thereby opening up the wood for the axe tool. Both sides of the head are shaped in such a manner as to minimise the chances of becoming stuck in the wood.

A slaters hammer is an extremely useful tool which consists of a claw head for removing nails, together with a sharp pointed head for punching holes into slate and a sheer edge which allows the slate to be shaped to fit perfectly. There is also a more traditional hammer shaped head which allows the nails to be hammered home. Effectively four tools in one!

While thankfully dentistry has come on in recent times it is not that long ago primitive dental hammers were used during treatment. Traditionally they were either one cylindrical shape with two flat ends or two flat discs placed either side of a steel ball. We can only imagine the excruciating pain but they were used to condense filling material after treatment. It is not clear what kind of success rate they had bearing in mind the pressure and the continuous tapping on the filling and tooth.

Over the years we have seen many different types of reflex hammer but they all create the same end result. Modern day reflex hammers, with their rubberlike head, are used to tap on a deep tendon to test reflexes. As the hammer head is made of a rubberlike material, of varying shapes, it carries significant force but will not actually cause damage. Reflex hammers are also used for chest percussion.

While hammer and chains come in a variety of different sizes, and materials, they are traditionally used for fire alarms. We have all seen the panic glass on storage facilities with the chain and hammer hanging down below. A sharp jolt with the hammerhead is all it takes and this removes the chances of being cut when using your hands.

War hammers are probably exactly what you imagine, tough hammerheads on extended shafts which offer significant leverage. The style changed over the years but was always based on a sharp pointed head (similar to an ice axe) and a traditional hammer block. The spike would cause significant damage to an individual while the hammerhead did not even need to penetrate armour to cause potentially deadly concussion.

While copper and hide hammers are perhaps not as well-known as the other hammers in this list, they are perfect for shaping metal without actually penetrating the surface. The hammerhead is copper at one side and rawhide at the other. This allows metal, such as car bodywork, to be shaped back into place without causing damage. Old-fashioned it may be but it is extremely effective!

A lath hammer is used when manipulating the thin flat strips of wood which make the foundations of a plaster wall. The axe head allows the wood to be trimmed into shape, the notch helps with the removal of nails and the traditional hammer striking head is use when driving nails into the wood. Lath hammers have a metal head and shaft with a rubber handle which absorbs impact forces.

Norse mythology goes back centuries and Thors hammer was one of the most fearsome weapons available at the time. The hammer is regularly depicted today in cartoons and Norse history although the actual hammer itself is called Mjlnir. While hammers have been used in battles for many years Thors hammer has a mystery all of its own.

Arent you amazed at how many types of hammers there actually are? Many people will be surprised to learn how far back we can trace the use of hammers in their most basic form, i.e. stone, and then moving on to various types of metal. The design, angling and structure of individual hammer are aligned perfectly to create the desired impact force. They are also available in many different materials with some deemed soft in comparison to the traditional hard hammerhead.

Even though there are many automatic hammers, and other similar products, available today the good old-fashioned claw hammer and its many compatriots still play a major role in the construction industry and everyday life!

Thanks Mark that was a crackingarticle and you have certainly educated both myself and the readers about various types of hammers that are available in the world. I had no idea that there were so many types of hammers actually out there!

There are also many more types of hammers not covered by this article, and many variants. If you want us to tell you about them let us know. Im sure weve got a 55 moretypes of hammers article in us.

So readers, what are your favorite type ortypes of hammers? We certainly have a few of our own favorite types of hammers at EngineeringClicks! One of my favorite types of hammers personally is the Dead Blow hammer, mainly because of its cool sounding name. Tell us yourfavorite types of hammers in the comments below.

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types of hammer and their uses available machinery

types of hammer and their uses available machinery

One of the most common tools were going to use for most projects during our life is the hammer. It is a tool that allows us to handle the materials, often destroying them, to re-shape them later, and create something better and more beautiful.

For its design, manufacturers commonly use a wooden, glass-fiber, and sometimes steel handle. It comes with or without the rubber grip, though we would recommend buying one with the rubber grip for more comfort. Its overall weight is between 455-680g.

The claw often has a curved design, and it also incorporates a V-shape perfect for drawing nails out of timber. We can use this claw to lever up floorboards, as well as any other surface that requires a lever.

This hammer has a rounded design, and one of its primary goals is to help us shape metals and close rivets. Because of that, this hammer performs well under professional applications, and its design allows it to have plenty of versatility to use it under different types of applications.

Another hammer designed to shape metal. Of course, you can use it for different applications, and it will perform well, but the cross pein is highly effective for starting panel pins, as well as tacks. For the handle, it features wood.

This hammer attempts to improve the comfort of the previous one, while also offering less weight and a comfortable design. It weighs roughly about 55g, or 4oz. It performs well and produces quality results, especially when it comes to cabinet work, as well as light joinery.

The Sledge Hammer is the perfect solution to deal with those surfaces that wont budge using any other type of tool. Clear examples of its capacity are that it breaks easily through concrete, masonry, or different stone types.

Nonetheless, that is not its only purpose. We can use the hammer for heavy work if we swing it like an ax, dealing all of the damage we require. However, we can still use it for lighter work as well by just using the heads weight.

Just like the previous one, the Sledge Hammer also requires us to wear our safety equipment. Not only for the debris that could get into our eyes, but also to keep us from hurting ourselves if we receive an unexpected impact.

These hammers seek to provide us an alternative when steel hammers are not careful enough, and the Joiner Mallet is not an option either. A soft hammer is capable of dealing with materials that dont require high pressure over them to shape or break.

These hammers take care of our handy work by allowing us to do an automatic operation. Long are the days when we had to fit every nail one by one, and that is the main reason why these hammers are as successful as they are.

We can find them available in two models, one for light duty, and one for heavy duty. The first model allows us to take care of picture frames and moldings. On the other hand, the heavy-duty power hammer is better for floorboards and more intense operations.

If you want to work at a faster rate without having to put plenty of effort and strength, these hammers are the tools youll need. The rotary hammer, and the drilling hammer are among the most popular power hammers available.

Were sure that the last thing youd want is to use an overpowered hammer for a task that requires a soft one. If you dont use the right one, the results are going to be less than pleasant, and it might ruin the overall quality of the final work.

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types of hammers & their uses - grainger knowhow

types of hammers & their uses - grainger knowhow

What are the best hammers you can have? That depends on what you are using them for. There are many different types of hammers. Each is designed with a certain function in mind. The best hammer is the hammer that is made for the task you are performing. Claw Hammer Claw hammers are the most common type of hammer. The head is smooth for clean finishing work. The claw is curved, allowing the hammer to rock when removing nails. Claw hammers are best for: Woodworking Prying Finishing Framing Hammer Also called a Rip Hammer, a framing hammer is a modified type of claw hammer. The claw is straight instead of curved. It also has a longer handle, is usually heavier. This type of hammer head has a rough or waffled face; it keeps the head from slipping when driving nails. Framing hammers are best for: Framing Splitting Small Demolition Ball Pein Hammer The ball pein hammer was originally designed for peeingthat is, shaping metal materials by hammering. One end of the head is ball-shaped for this purpose. The other end is flat and is used for driving. Ball Pein hammers are best for: Metalworking Rounding edges Punching and riveting Drywall Hammer Hanging drywall? Removing drywall? Either way, you will need a drywall hammer. These types of hammers are lightweight hammers with a rounded head on one end. This helps with preventing imperfections in the drywall. The other end is hatchet-shaped, for cutting boards. Drywall hammers are best for: Hanging drywall Drywall demolition Plaster Roofing Hammer Also called a shingle hammer or slate, these types of hammers are designed for working with slate shingles while roofing. The roofing hammer has a flat head on one end for driving nails. The other end has a long pick. This is to pierce holes in slate before driving into the rooftop. It may also come with a stub at the base of the pick that forms a claw for removing nails. Roofing hammers are best for: Shingling Roofing Slate work Brick Hammer Brick hammers are used in all kinds of masonry work. The chisel end is for scoring and the clean breaking of brick and stone. The blunt end is also for breaking stone or concrete, though less neatly. They may also be called a bricklaying hammer, a tile setters hammer, or a stonemason hammer. Brick hammers are best for: Bricklaying Demolition of hard materials General masonry Tack Hammer Tack hammers are very small, very lightweight hammers. These types of hammers are designed for driving small, delicate nails. These hammers may also be called upholstery hammers and were made for attaching fabrics to furniture. It also has a magnetic end to help place small nails and tacks. Tack hammers are best for: Upholstery Precision, lightweight hammering Setting tacks Rubber Mallet A mallet is a block on a handle, which is usually used for driving chisels. The head on a rubber mallet is made of rubber. These types of hammers deliver softer impact than hammers with metal heads. They are essential if your work needs to be free of impact marks. Rubber Mallets are best for: Shaping metal Fitting wooden parts Plasterboard Sledgehammer Sledgehammers are a large hammer with a metal, mallet-like head. Their handles are long, designed to be held with both hands. They can range anywhere from 3-16 lbs. These types of hammers deliver a mighty blow, designed for breaking stone and demolition work. Sledgehammers are best for: Breaking stone Driving stakes Demolition Drilling Hammer Think of a drilling hammer as the sledgehammers baby brother. Also called engineers hammers or club hammers, these offer the same kind of pound as a sledgehammer, but on a smaller scale. They are small and light enough that they are held with one hand. Drilling hammers are best for: Driving stakes Demolition Chiseling Dead Blow Hammer A dead blow hammer drives a lot of force, inside a sleek, non-marring coating. These are a type of mallet designed to strike surfaces with great force. They deliver a no-bounce hitthat is, they dont rebound after striking. Dead Blow hammers are best for: Automotive Setting joints Dent removal Welders Hammer The most recognizable feature of a welders hammer is the handle. It is made of a barrel spring, which is designed to interrupt the flow of heat through the handle, keeping the welders hand safe from the high temperatures. The head is designed for chipping, which is why this type of hammer is also frequently referred to as a chipping hammer. Welders hammers are best for: Welding Removing slag Chipping Choosing the Best Type of Hammer Of all the types of hammers, you will only need the ones that are useful in your trade. Because many hammers have similar designs, it may appear that one hammer should be good enough for a variety of uses. Choosing the best hammer for the job at hand is the only way to ensure youre getting the most out of your tool.

What are the best hammers you can have? That depends on what you are using them for. There are many different types of hammers. Each is designed with a certain function in mind. The best hammer is the hammer that is made for the task you are performing.

Also called a Rip Hammer, a framing hammer is a modified type of claw hammer. The claw is straight instead of curved. It also has a longer handle, is usually heavier. This type of hammer head has a rough or waffled face; it keeps the head from slipping when driving nails.

The ball pein hammer was originally designed for peeingthat is, shaping metal materials by hammering. One end of the head is ball-shaped for this purpose. The other end is flat and is used for driving.

Hanging drywall? Removing drywall? Either way, you will need a drywall hammer. These types of hammers are lightweight hammers with a rounded head on one end. This helps with preventing imperfections in the drywall. The other end is hatchet-shaped, for cutting boards.

Also called a shingle hammer or slate, these types of hammers are designed for working with slate shingles while roofing. The roofing hammer has a flat head on one end for driving nails. The other end has a long pick. This is to pierce holes in slate before driving into the rooftop. It may also come with a stub at the base of the pick that forms a claw for removing nails.

Brick hammers are used in all kinds of masonry work. The chisel end is for scoring and the clean breaking of brick and stone. The blunt end is also for breaking stone or concrete, though less neatly. They may also be called a bricklaying hammer, a tile setters hammer, or a stonemason hammer.

Tack hammers are very small, very lightweight hammers. These types of hammers are designed for driving small, delicate nails. These hammers may also be called upholstery hammers and were made for attaching fabrics to furniture. It also has a magnetic end to help place small nails and tacks.

A mallet is a block on a handle, which is usually used for driving chisels. The head on a rubber mallet is made of rubber. These types of hammers deliver softer impact than hammers with metal heads. They are essential if your work needs to be free of impact marks.

Sledgehammers are a large hammer with a metal, mallet-like head. Their handles are long, designed to be held with both hands. They can range anywhere from 3-16 lbs. These types of hammers deliver a mighty blow, designed for breaking stone and demolition work.

Think of a drilling hammer as the sledgehammers baby brother. Also called engineers hammers or club hammers, these offer the same kind of pound as a sledgehammer, but on a smaller scale. They are small and light enough that they are held with one hand.

A dead blow hammer drives a lot of force, inside a sleek, non-marring coating. These are a type of mallet designed to strike surfaces with great force. They deliver a no-bounce hitthat is, they dont rebound after striking.

The most recognizable feature of a welders hammer is the handle. It is made of a barrel spring, which is designed to interrupt the flow of heat through the handle, keeping the welders hand safe from the high temperatures. The head is designed for chipping, which is why this type of hammer is also frequently referred to as a chipping hammer.

Of all the types of hammers, you will only need the ones that are useful in your trade. Because many hammers have similar designs, it may appear that one hammer should be good enough for a variety of uses. Choosing the best hammer for the job at hand is the only way to ensure youre getting the most out of your tool.

The information contained in this article is intended for general information purposes only and is based on information available as of the initial date of publication. No representation is made that the information or references are complete or remain current. This article is not a substitute for review of current applicable government regulations, industry standards, or other standards specific to your business and/or activities and should not be construed as legal advice or opinion. Readers with specific questions should refer to the applicable standards or consult with an attorney.

The information contained in this article is intended for general information purposes only and is based on information available as of the initial date of publication. No representation is made that the information or references are complete or remain current. This article is not a substitute for review of current applicable government regulations, industry standards, or other standards specific to your business and/or activities and should not be construed as legal advice or opinion. Readers with specific questions should refer to the applicable standards or consult with an attorney.

hammer time 7 common hammers & when to use them

hammer time 7 common hammers & when to use them

Its hammer time cue the music. To most interns and entry-level engineers a hammer is a hammer. They all look the same and theyre all used to bang stuff together, right? Actually, it is not that simple. Sometimes using the wrong hammer can be dangerous to the user or cause damage. Other times using the wrong hammer will lead to wasting a lot of time with little results. All hammers were designed and engineered for a specific purpose. Knowing that purpose will help you select the right tool for the joband make you look like less of a rookie. Lets learn how to choose wisely.

When most people think of a hammer they picture a claw hammer. This is because they are the most ubiquitous hammer around a house. Claw hammers are used in construction or maintenance to drive or remove nails. They consist of a large cylindrical striking head with a flat face and two claws on the opposite side of the hammer head. These claws are designed to be used like a crowbar to pry up nails. A standard claw hammer, pictured on the left in Figure 1, has a solid metal head with a wooden or composite shaft which is meant for light duty. A framing claw hammer, as pictured to the right in Figure 1, is a single piece of metal. This type of claw hammer is meant for prying or heavy-duty use where a wooden handle would break.

Claw hammers are typically lightweight and measured in ounces not pounds. They are built to be swung at thousands of nails by a user all day long. The lightweight design allows the user to swing very quickly to deliver a great deal of force. Because theyre lightweight they are suited for striking lightweight metal objects like nails. They work poorly for hitting solid heavy objects. In fact, striking heavy objects with a claw hammer can be dangerous as the hammer might rebound and strike the user or others. Additionally, because the hammer head is hardened for wear resistance, it will damage softer objects such as woods, plastics, painted surfaces, and metals like aluminum.

Like the claw hammer a ball-peen hammer shares the same striking surface but in place of the claw it has a domed head referred to as the ball. This ball is used to deform or peen soft materials. Ball-peens can be used to drive nails, hardened dowel pins, or other small lightweight metallic items too large for a claw hammer. Like the claw hammer they are ill-suited for hammering heavy or soft objects as they are relatively lightweight. A good rule of thumb is to use a ball-peen when the object being struck is bigger than a nail but smaller than the hammer head. A ball-peen is available with either a wooden or all-metal handle. An all-metal handle is useful for heavy, repeated striking.

The historic use of a ball-peen was to manually round off edges of rivets. A rivet is a fastener that joins two pieces of material together. Before welding, it was the primary way to connect large steel beams and plates together. A hole would be drilled between the two plates to be joined. Then a soft pin (rivet) would be inserted into the hole. A heavy anvil would be placed on one side of the pin and the ball-peen would be used to strike the opposite side. With enough force, both ends of the pin would deform and flare out. The hammer would be spun around and the ball end would be used to mushroom (peen) the top of the flared pin. As the rivet was peened over it locked the two plates together. Hence the name using the ball end to peen the rivet.

A linemans hammer is a heavy hammer, measured in pounds, used to knock around heavy and solid objects. Unlike the claw or ball-peen, it is meant to be swung much slower letting the weight of the hammerhead do the work. This is a get out of the way hammer as its essentially a small sledge hammer. The main striking face is large and dense while the rear side tends to be pointed. The purpose of the pointed end is to concentrate all the force from the hammer to a smaller area and amplify the impact.

This hammer is meant to drive heavy objects together or apart, such as spikes into utility poles, which is where it got its name. A variant of this hammer is used by blacksmiths to hammer red-hot metal in order to form it or by machinists to join large parts together. Due to the hammers weight, it is not easy to control mid-swing. Therefore, this hammer is not meant for highly precise repetitive tasks. Likewise, due to the weight of the hammer, it will damage just about anything that isnt as hard as the hammerhead. Do not use this hammer on surfaces or items you dont want to break, mar, or dent.

A mallet is a hammer used to strike an object without damaging it. They are typically lightweight and made from solid wood, rubber, or leather. Due to their lack of weight, they are typically not very good at moving objects a great distance. Instead, they are better suited for seating (nudging) objects together. Likewise, mallets have large blunt faces which make them poor for precise work. Because they land with a relatively soft blow they are also good for driving chisels and cutting tools. Their mild blow ensures that you will not damage the chisel or take too large of a cut. Be warned that mallets tend to rebound due to their soft heads. If striking a hard object it is possible it could jump back at you.

A soft face hammer has the weight of a ball-peen but contains soft polymer, brass, or rubber striking faces. Most soft face hammers contain two cylindrical striking faces each having dissimilar material types. For example, one face would be a soft rubber while its opposing face is made from a harder urethane. This gives the user options and combines two tools into one neat package.

These hammers are good for hammering objects with a greater force than a mallet without damaging the object the way a solid metal hammer would. Additionally, the head of the hammer tends to be much smaller making them more ideal for precision work where a mallet wouldnt fit.

A dead blow hammer is a solid polymer mallet with a hidden secret. Inside the hammer head is a cylinder filled with lead shot, sand, or steel shot. When the hammer is swung the shot lands dispelling all of the energy into the object being struck. This virtually eliminates any rebound within the hammers head, which is a common problem with a standard mallet. The shot delivers a great deal of force per swing without the hammer needing to be very heavy.

Due to the dead blow being made of polymer it is very helpful in minimizing the damage to a struck surface. Therefore, the dead blow is used very similarly to a traditional mallet but for objects which need a little more force in order to move. Dead blows are great at dislodging stuck parts, driving stiff wooden joints together, or to pop small dents out of sheet metal. This hammer is also ideal for striking objects with a great amount of controlled force such as chisels and other sharp objects. This allows for more aggressive cuts without damaging the chisel.

The sledge hammer is the big daddy of them all. Chances are if you are using a sledge hammer in a work environment you are at a construction site, large heavy manufacturing site.or YOU ARE DOING SOMETHING WRONG!

A sledge hammer is a VERY heavy hammer with a handle as long as an axe. If you need more description than that you are on your own. It is meant for blunt force trauma combining its heavy weight with the long handle to swing it quickly. This combined effect delivers a great amount of force to a small area in order to move or more likely to break something.

Written By: Sean Derrick Product Development Engineer| Sean has a B.S. in Engineering Design and a M.S. in Manufacturing Engineering from Western Michigan University. He has over 7 years of product development experience in a variety of industries ranging from medical, automotive, furniture, consumer products, and defense. Seanenjoys hiking, mountaineering, skiing,movies, and is pursuing a Ph.D inhis free time.

I would plant the stake with a few blows untill its one third into the ground with a short handle dead blow hammer, and drive it the rest of the way if the soil is soft, use a longer handle and heavier sledge hammer if the ground is hard.

Another use for a Ball-Peen that doesnt come up as much any more is as a Fuller, in traditional blacksmithy. Especially for Farriers, they just dont make, and sell Fullers like they used to. So, this is one you can swing by the local Hardware store, and pick up to draw out metal. In knife making, the Fullers are often called Blood Groves, but are actually a way to draw out, lighten, and stiffen a blade. They have nothing to do with blood. However, most modern ones have it ground in, while originally, hand forged blades were drawn out to full width by hammering them between 2 fullers. One with a handle, you whack into the top with another hammer. The other has a square spike you put in the hole (The Fuller Hole) in the top of an anvil. Or screw into a vice. Farriers have to do a lot less fuller work, now that you can get cast shoes in standardized sizes. However, youre unlikely to find one that doesnt have a Ball Peen Hammer/Fuller in their kit, in case they need it.

I was researching what made a dead blow hammer different from a rubber mallet and came across this article. This actually taught me quite a bit about the specific uses for various types of hammers. Thank you for sharing the information!

I need the sort of hammer that you could place in the hole above the flat of an anode rod. The face of the hammer would be flat to match the face of the anode rod. The top of the hammer would also be flat. I would hit that with another hammer. The idea is to loosen the anode rod. Otherwise I must scrap my hot water heater sooner or later, because the anode rod is immovable.

The intent of this page is certainly good. And much of the information is rather accurate and helpful. But some of the information is misleading. Case in point: The light duty framing claw hammer has a solid steel handle because This type of claw hammer is meant for prying or heavy-duty use where a wooden handle would break. If that argument is true, why do the heavy duty Linemans hammer and the enough said sledge hammer have wooden handles? Wont those wood handles break? Truth is that most types of hammers come in various styles with wooden, steel, fiberglass or titanium handles (there may be more types). Each type of handle is used in its specific product based on strength, weight, durability and cost requirements. In general, wood handles are found in lower-price hammers. The better the hammer, the better the handle. Professionals, and those appreciating quality tools, will pay more for a good hammer because it will last longer and, in general, works better than a lower-quality hammer. For instance, I own and use a framing claw hammer (similar to the hammer shown in the picture) and a finish claw hammer that are both made by Estwing. They are more expensive than the average hammer but they are balanced so well that they are a joy to use and are much less tiring to use than lesser hammers. So be sure to purchase and use the tool that best meets your needs. Go to a lumber company that sells tools and ask them about hammersyou will get information from people who really know about them. Sales people at big box or general merchandise stores may or may not know much about the different types of hammers.

Theres nothing misleading regarding what youre referring to. Im a third generation carpenter with three decades of carpentry in the professional industry under my belt & worked with & for my father & grandfather in this trade since I could barely walk. There is absolutely nothing misleading about the purpose of a metal bodied hammer being more suited for prying &/or heavy duty use that is exactly correct. Case & point, concrete foundation work. As it clearly states & you quoted, prying is its most obvious & biggest benefit, thus you will not break the handleRegardless of how you swing &/or abuse it, it will survive. & although it is suited for such ause & abuse, it is still the same essential size as any other conventional hammer. In fact you can find an Estwing in just about any & every size, in both straight & curved claw. To further correct you, the reason the Linemans hammer & the Sledge are commonly found with a wooden handle (tho these days less-so, given the increasingly ubiquitous nature & decreasing cost of composites etc) is because theyre not fir prying at all. Arguably 99% of broken handles are due to heavy prying. THUS exactly what the aforementioned information states, verbatim. However, there is the single percentile of incidents where an individual swings violently (generally during demo work & misses the intended object (or not) & strikes the handle on concrete or metal or any inanimate object of greater density & snaps the slender wooden handle. Ergo, lineman & sledge hammers are strictly (as clearly stated) are better suited for blunt force &/or increased energy in, not only a single, but less violent swing/blow. Vis--vis, the majority of the time, nothing more than a wooden handle is necessary. Not to mention, any kind of real man enjoys & prefers the classic simplicity & historic nature of a good ol wooden handled hammer.. Insert raspberry here

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