how to build a shaker le

diy shaker cabinet door update - organized-ish by lela burris

diy shaker cabinet door update - organized-ish by lela burris

So with a tiny budget and a big imagination, I headed to the home improvement store in hopes of working a miracle.I really didnt have a shopping list or a game plan or anything.I just wandered around until inspiration struck.(Not the best practice for projects, but every once in a while it works for me.)In the midst of my wandering, I found these babies.A bundled up ten pack of long skinny strips of hobby wood.YES! That will totally work!I started by sanding them all down with sanding sponges.I knew a palm sander would be too rough on the soft wood.After removing all my cabinet doors and bringing them all out onto the back deck, I measured and cut the long sides of each cabinet frame first, then measured and cut the two shorter top and bottom pieces.Since a shaker style cabinet doesnt require mitered edges, I was able to line it all up without cutting any angles.Its pretty and it saves a ton of time!Youll want to cut the pieces with a circular saw or table saw, but I loaned my circular out so I used a jigsaw with a precision blade. It actually worked out great.If a jigsaw is all you have, youll need to put a little painters tape on your cut line to reduce splintering.This hobby wood is kind of soft, so it splinters very easily.After all my pieces were cut for each individual cabinet and the edges were sanded smooth, I broke out the wood glue and started slapping them on.By the time I finished gluing on the frame for the last cabinet door, the first one I had done was nice and dry.Then I started adding finishing nails for extra security.The glue will hold well, but I like an insurance plan.I used a nail set tool to drive the nail a little lower than the frame so theyll be completely invisible after filling and painting.I used two nails per wood piece, so eight nails per door.And just as I was finishing up the final nails on the final door frame, I get a text from my husband, who was at work, telling me that we are under a tornado watch.Umm, what???Ive been outside with overcast skies this whole time, completely unaware that the weather may get bad.I scurried around the deck bringing in the doors as fast as possible, and minutes later, the downpour happened.Ahh, the joys of weekend projects!So from my new project space, aka the kitchen, I began filling in the holes on the inside of each door with wood filler.I like these squeeze tubes better than the tubs because the precision point is much easier to fill a big hole like this.I also used the wood filler to cover the inset nail holes on the frames and the cracks between the frame.Once it was all dry, I sanded it all over again.Just a heads up, by now, youll despise sanding.Youll never want to sand anything ever again.Fair warning.Next up, caulk.Again, I used the precision tube.Mainly because my caulk gun is hard to use. And messy. And Im lazy.I caulked around each edge on the inside and outside of the frames.After 24 hours, they were all ready to paint!PS: You can view the cabinet door painting tutorial here.So for those of you who like numbers, be prepared to be persuaded.To reface cabinets, you have to purchase custom sizes.These doors range from $15 to $60 each. Plus extra money to drill hinge holes.Lets say you considered the mid-range option, plus hole drilling.If your kitchen has 16 cabinet doors like mine, youre looking at between $800 and $1000 including shipping.OR you can be awesome like me, DIY your own, and throw down a whopping $20-ish dollars.The wood bundle was under $10, the wood glue was $3, and the tubes of caulk and filler were $3 each.I already owned the finishing nails, paint, and tools, so this project was one of the cheapest Ive done.I did, however, change up the hinges and hardware, but those are totally optional.More on the hardware I used in the next post of this series.Want to follow along with my low-cost kitchen renovation?Check out these other posts I shared during the process.How To Paint Cabinet Doors And Install Hardware The Right WayOpen Shelving Kitchen Pantry And Coffee BarCreate Open Shelving With Existing Upper CabinetsComing Soon: How To Install Tile Backsplash On A Budget AND My Kitchen Reveal! Related posts: How to Update Cabinet Hardware Small Galley Kitchen Update Open Kitchen Shelving One Year Update 7 Affordable Ways To Update Your Kitchen

After removing all my cabinet doors and bringing them all out onto the back deck, I measured and cut the long sides of each cabinet frame first, then measured and cut the two shorter top and bottom pieces.

Then I started adding finishing nails for extra security.The glue will hold well, but I like an insurance plan.I used a nail set tool to drive the nail a little lower than the frame so theyll be completely invisible after filling and painting.I used two nails per wood piece, so eight nails per door.And just as I was finishing up the final nails on the final door frame, I get a text from my husband, who was at work, telling me that we are under a tornado watch.Umm, what???Ive been outside with overcast skies this whole time, completely unaware that the weather may get bad.I scurried around the deck bringing in the doors as fast as possible, and minutes later, the downpour happened.Ahh, the joys of weekend projects!So from my new project space, aka the kitchen, I began filling in the holes on the inside of each door with wood filler.I like these squeeze tubes better than the tubs because the precision point is much easier to fill a big hole like this.I also used the wood filler to cover the inset nail holes on the frames and the cracks between the frame.Once it was all dry, I sanded it all over again.Just a heads up, by now, youll despise sanding.Youll never want to sand anything ever again.Fair warning.Next up, caulk.Again, I used the precision tube.Mainly because my caulk gun is hard to use. And messy. And Im lazy.I caulked around each edge on the inside and outside of the frames.After 24 hours, they were all ready to paint!PS: You can view the cabinet door painting tutorial here.So for those of you who like numbers, be prepared to be persuaded.To reface cabinets, you have to purchase custom sizes.These doors range from $15 to $60 each. Plus extra money to drill hinge holes.Lets say you considered the mid-range option, plus hole drilling.If your kitchen has 16 cabinet doors like mine, youre looking at between $800 and $1000 including shipping.OR you can be awesome like me, DIY your own, and throw down a whopping $20-ish dollars.The wood bundle was under $10, the wood glue was $3, and the tubes of caulk and filler were $3 each.I already owned the finishing nails, paint, and tools, so this project was one of the cheapest Ive done.I did, however, change up the hinges and hardware, but those are totally optional.More on the hardware I used in the next post of this series.Want to follow along with my low-cost kitchen renovation?Check out these other posts I shared during the process.How To Paint Cabinet Doors And Install Hardware The Right WayOpen Shelving Kitchen Pantry And Coffee BarCreate Open Shelving With Existing Upper CabinetsComing Soon: How To Install Tile Backsplash On A Budget AND My Kitchen Reveal! Related posts: How to Update Cabinet Hardware Small Galley Kitchen Update Open Kitchen Shelving One Year Update 7 Affordable Ways To Update Your Kitchen

So for those of you who like numbers, be prepared to be persuaded.To reface cabinets, you have to purchase custom sizes.These doors range from $15 to $60 each. Plus extra money to drill hinge holes.Lets say you considered the mid-range option, plus hole drilling.If your kitchen has 16 cabinet doors like mine, youre looking at between $800 and $1000 including shipping.OR you can be awesome like me, DIY your own, and throw down a whopping $20-ish dollars.The wood bundle was under $10, the wood glue was $3, and the tubes of caulk and filler were $3 each.I already owned the finishing nails, paint, and tools, so this project was one of the cheapest Ive done.I did, however, change up the hinges and hardware, but those are totally optional.More on the hardware I used in the next post of this series.Want to follow along with my low-cost kitchen renovation?Check out these other posts I shared during the process.How To Paint Cabinet Doors And Install Hardware The Right WayOpen Shelving Kitchen Pantry And Coffee BarCreate Open Shelving With Existing Upper CabinetsComing Soon: How To Install Tile Backsplash On A Budget AND My Kitchen Reveal! Related posts: How to Update Cabinet Hardware Small Galley Kitchen Update Open Kitchen Shelving One Year Update 7 Affordable Ways To Update Your Kitchen

Hi there, cant wait to start this project, thank you for sharing! I was just wondering; when you cauked the outer edge, did that help hide any rounding your original door had? Im confident in my ability to follow your instructions, but concerned Ill have a gap due to the existing rounded edge? Thanks so much!

Hi, Heather! The caulking did help, but youll still have a tiny bit of gap due to a rounded edge. Its minimally noticeable, though, so youll only see it when youre right in front of the door. I hope this helps, and good luck with your project.

Standard size for a 1 x 3 is actually 3/4 x 2 1/2 for those width inquiring minds. Were about to start this project for 20 doors. Thanks for the great instructions. Our doors currently look exactly like your old ones did so were looking forward to getting the same results.

Thanks for the added info, William! Good luck with your own project, and get ready for a massive leap forward. Its like your entire kitchen jumps into a time machine and realizes that it left the Motley Crue Halloween wig behind, but it still knows how to rock out anyway.

Hi. I love it!! Im in the process of updating my kitchen. Can you please tell me the exact name of that wood trim from Lowes? From all thats happening right now, they only have online shopping and I have to order the exact one online.

Hi, Merl! Im glad you love it! Both of the materials Lela used for this are from DAP. The wood trim is the DAP DryDex white spackling and nail hole filler, and the caulk is the DAP Alex Fast Dry White Paintable Latex Caulk. Be sure to grab them in the squeeze bottles. She used the 5.5 ounce bottles of each, and theyre so much easier than those big tubs. I hope this helps!

Hey Merl! I just realized Brad replied with the spackle and caulk materials but forgot the actual wood trim. It was a 1x2x8 furring strip. If you can find a half inch furring strip instead of a one inch, it will be better. In the blog post above theres a linked image that gives the entire list of materials used, but this link will take you to it also. https://www.lelaburris.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Shaker-Cabinet-Door-Shopping-List.pdf

What an upgrade Lela, and they look so simple to do as well. I love the fact that they are so cheap, when purchasing kitchen cabinets the carcass is usually pretty cheap, but the fascias are the expensive bits, youve shown that they dont need to be. at ~$20 a door, well super budget friendly.

shaker style diy end table

shaker style diy end table

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Alright, here it is table #4 of the four part end table series! In case you missed it over on my Instagram page, weve been considering new end tables for our living room but couldnt decide on a style, so I just went ahead and built a few! This table is the most detailed of the four and would also make a great nightstand if youre in the market!

Ill be honest, I ran into a few issues during assembly on this one basically I took this thing apart and assembled it like 57 different ways before I figured out the best way to do it. But dont worry! I wrote the plans the correct way and you shouldnt have any issues! Nothing like winging it to remind you NOT to wing it haha. But it worked out in the end.

Use wood glue and two 1 1/4 pocket hole screws on each end of the 1x2s to attach them to the legs. Position the 1x2s so theyre flush with the outside of the legs and face the pocket holes toward the inside to best hide them.

Join both frames together with 1x2s in the front and back. Again, position the 1x2s flush with the outside of the legs and face the pocket holes toward the inside of the frame to best hide them. Use wood glue and two 1 1/4 pocket hole screws on each end of the 1x2s.

Dont forget to flip that bottom front 12 horizontal! It will be part of the bottom shelf when you put the plywood in place. Line the bottom of it up with the bottom of the rest of the 1x2s (2 up from the ground).

I went with a shaker style cabinet door for this end table. I wrote a whole separate post on my go-to method to build shaker style cabinet doors, but there are a million ways to do it. If youre an experienced woodworker, feel free to build it as you see fit. If youre interested in how I did it, see my post on how to build shaker cabinet doors.

Attach the cabinet door with 2 butt hinges and install a small magnetic door catch behind the front frame to stop the door flush with the frame when it closes. I used a small scrap 12 as a block to attach the magnetic catch.

Lastly, attach the tabletop to the base. You can screw directly through the top 2x2s into the bottom of the tabletop, but youll have to go at a slight angle since a standard size drill wont fit between the top shelf and tabletop.

I used small 3/4 corner braces and attached them to the bottom of the tabletop first, then put it in place on the frame and screwed them to the top 22 frame. I wouldnt recommend this method since it was such a pain to get the corner braces positioned correctly, but thats what I did!

Thanks! I sanded it to 120 grit, applied pre-stain then whitewash pickling and wiped it off. Let the whitewash pickling dry. Then apply early american stain and wipe it off immediately. That should do it! The white wash takes the yellowy color out of the pine, but you have to make sure its pretty dry before applying the stain so the stain pigments dont just separate when you put it over the whitewash. I usually let it dry for about 20 minutes before going over with the early american

Hi! We love these plans! Such a cute table! Could you lease give us inside cabinet dimensions? We want to use it to store vinyl records and cant tell for certain how big the inside cabinet is with the door shut. Thanks!

Thank you! As I started I noticed I had a lot of scraps in almost the dimensions you referenced so I kept it true early American and used what I had and modified as I went. Table top and 2x2s are oak taken from my wifes great grandparents barn so I hand planed and scraped to smooth and used left over birch plywood for the sides. Im torn n how to stain it now. My thoughts were natural on the oak and then play with mixes until I get the plywood close. Any suggestions?

Is the 22 actual size? Or are you using 1.51.5? The measurements didnt work out when we put it together with 22. Also curious how you got yours with squared edges, we can not find them anywhere. Thank you.

The ACTUAL dimensions of dimensional lumber (2x2s, 2x4s, 4x4s, basically anything you buy at a normal home improvement store not a sawmill) is different from their dimensional name. So 2x2s are actually 1.5 x 1.5. 2x4s are actually 1.5 x 3.5. And so on. You can look up charts to see what the ACTUAL dimensions are for each size of dimensional lumber. Dimensional lumber is named for the dimensions its cut to before they run it through the planer and send it to the store.

Me and my boyfriend just finished assembling this end table. We modified it slightly and installed outlets. I am super excited to get it stained and sealed. Thank you for sharing your plans for free! Your pictures and video were super helpful to us (we are mega amateurs lol).

Thanks for the great plans. We would like to use some beadboard instead of plywood for the front panel of the cabinet. We also have a narrower space to put this as a nightstand so will change the cut plan. Can you think of anything in particular we should keep in mind as we modify things? I am a real newbie at woodworking but my husband and I got excited by a headboard we recently made. You make it look like so much fun and so doable.

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17 diy table ideas: coffee table, picnic table, and many more - this old house

17 diy table ideas: coffee table, picnic table, and many more - this old house

Rather than tangling chairs around teetering folding tables in your backyard, devote an afternoon to building this beauty. Follow the step-by-step instructions in our How to Build a Picnic Table with Attached Benches tutorial.

Rustic wood meets modern metal to create this strikingand timelesspiece of furniture. Tom Silva and Kevin OConnor show how to make a live-edge console table of your own. Pick up the full step-by-step tutorial with how-to video here.

For an outdoor table that can withstand the harshest of winters and the stickiest of fingers, opt for hypertufa. Hypertufa is a mixture combines cement with peat moss and perlite for a final product that weighs less than concrete and wont require sealing.

Create this one-of-a-kind table for the cost of, well, just legs. Visit How to Build a Coffee Table from a Salvaged Cabinet Door to access our full step-by-step guide. The job can be done in about an hour.

The rustic charm and durability of this rough-sawn cedar table only improves with age and wear. You can build the X-shaped table and bench legs over the course of a weekend. Find the cut list, tools and materials in our How to Build a Classic Picnic Table step-by-step project. Video after the jump, too.

Spice up (and organize) your front entry with a small table that anchors to the wall, taking up just enough space to give your wallet and keys a permanent home. Complete this $70 project after visiting How to Build a Table from Stair Parts for the full tutorial.

Arrange stock molding into a pattern, then cut and attach to a table to amp up style. You can stain or paint the enhanced piece for a finished look. Visit How to Trim Out a Plain Table for the full step-by-step guide.

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