how to make wood drying kiln

kiln dry lumber at home : 6 steps (with pictures) - instructables

kiln dry lumber at home : 6 steps (with pictures) - instructables

Kiln drying your own wood at home can be a great way to sustainably harvest the materials around you, and dry it fast enough to build furniture with. If furniture is made with wood that is too wet, it will continue to dry and crack, possibly ruining the piece. This instructable takes you through the process of raw wood in the spring, to dry lumber in the fall. You can do this with any kind of wood.

Finding rough timber and logs to mill is a lot easier than you may think. There's always someone around that's trying to get rid of a fallen tree or wants to take down a dead tree. Calling around to local tree trimmers and arborists can lead to some great opportunities. These people make a living with trees, and if you can offer them a fair price for a log, they'll often choose to sell it because it saves them the work of disposal, or processing it into firewood. Put an add in the paper, call your local city or municipality and ask about who deals with downed trees. The list goes on and on, but you can definitely find something. The term "windfall" comes from just that, wind storms can mean lots of wood. Once you've gotten the wood, local sawyers are plentiful in most areas, and many will bring their portable sawmill to you for a very reasonable rate. I pay $100 an hour here, and a good sawyer can do a lot in an hour. Worth their weight in gold, these hardworking folks are a woodworkers dream come true, and they often have a stock of amazing, local woods for sale.You can also choose to mill it yourself with a chainsaw, which I partially do sometimes depending on the log. If you choose to do this, read up, and follow all the safety precautions of those tools. And like anything in woodworking, protect your eyes, ears and lungs.

If you don't seal the end grain of your logs and timbers, they will crack and split as moisture is perspired. The end grain needs to be sealed up with a material that will close up the open pores of the wood. I often mix 50/50 wood glue and water then saturate the ends several times. You can also use paint or wax. These logs all started off at a pretty normal 32 percent moisture content.

Start off by air drying your wood for a few months to shed the first bit of water naturally, maybe a loss of eight to ten percent. Stack the wood up with plenty of spacers, or stickers, to allow for good airflow, and I like to put a piece of plastic on the ground under the wood to keep the humidity from the ground from effecting the lumber. I bind the wood with tie downs to minimize cracking and twisting, and I build a temporary plastic roof to keep off the rain. Place it in a location with good prevailing winds, it makes a big difference.

After a few months, bring the wood indoors and finish the drying. To build the kiln lay poly (clear plastic roll) on the ground and then build a frame with 2x4 studs on top of it for the lumber to rest on. Leave enough space to have a standard household dehumidifier at one end, and a small fan at the other. The fan circulates the air to even out the drying. I designed mine to pull air from below, then blow the air down a plastic tube to the other end. This way I know there's no stagnant air or dampness trapped in the kiln. This one is 20 feet, or 6 meters, long. The dehumidifier is also trapped inside the kiln and is set to maximum. This model has a hose that runs out of the kiln and fills a bucket. The kiln is built around the stacked and bound lumber over a light wooden frame that carries the plastic. All seams need to be sealed with vapour barrier tape to hold the moisture in. I cut a few small access holes to control the dehumidifier and to test the woods moisture content in various places. Tape up these holes after you use them. The wood remained in the kiln for about 4 months and reached an average of 8 percent. This is mostly 2" thick arbutus, also called madrone.

Using this unique wood often presents the opportunity to really showcase a unique piece of wood that you can be proud of harvesting in a sustainable manner. Thanks for taking the time to read through this instructable, now get out there and save some logs!

Im not sure how to ask this but I hope it make sense. What would be the best way to slice the log into slabs to prevent splitting and twisting? Is there a rule of thumb to follow? Im getting ready to process a winged elm. Thanks in advance.

The drawback of this method is the power consumption. Four months with a fan (say 35W) and dehumidifier (about 240W) is about 800 kWh, which would be a substantial addition to a power bill.Out of interest what was the ambient temperature? At low temperatures the rate of drying would be slow, while these dehumidifiers are usually designed to cut out at 32 C.

If I air-dry pine (Southern yellow pine) for 6 weeks with end coating and Borax and high strength termiticide and then 6 weeks with electric fan, will I get twisting in vertical beams sawn to 12" by 12" and 20 feet long? Could I use sooner than 12 weeks and put beam under light compression (vertical members) load? Tak

Hi, Would you mind giving me a little more of a "recipe" I suppose to your drying techniques? Im very new to this hobby and I want to make a table out of fresh cut hardwood. I also want it to be an outdoor table. Thanks for your time anyway.

not all sawyers know what they are doing. I asked for some quarter sawn oak and he started cutting parallel with the grain instead of perpendicular. He did not understand. I tried to correct him but the best part of the wood was ruined for quarter sawn. So have the confidence to double check and confirm that you are getting what you wanted. That means draw a picture on the log if that is what it takes.

I read that one of the important parts of kiln dried lumber is that it is heated to kill bugs. Should be heat the wood using a solar wall or something like that or would it dry out the wood to fast. I need to process red oak.

We made a large kiln for a Boy Scout camp using the body from an old dairy delivery truck. We air dry for about one month, then rack the wood in the kiln and use a dehumidifier and small fan. With the insulation, we can use the kiln in the winter (in Ohio) as the returned heat from the de-humidifier and the fan motor are sufficient, or we can add a small heater. The kiln is nearly air-tight and the de-humidifier drains through the floor. An alternative to a de-humidifier is a simple recycled window air conditioner where the cooled (dried) air is directed back through the compression coils and then out to the racked wood instead of exhausting the heated air outdoors. This arrangement should have a higher capacity than most de-humidifiers.

the fan is inside the plastic "room"( if you look close you can see the base of it in the pic) basically it just circulates the air inside the kiln, the plastic tube directs the damp air towards the dehumidifier without blowing over the lumber again. Be warned home dehumidifier are not designed for wood drying. The coils will slowly deteriorate from the acid in the wood. Coils in wood kilns are coated for protection. Coated with what?....I have yet to find out.

Just a thought but the coils might be helped by lightly spraying them with a rattle can of outside grade clearcoat. On the other hand you don't need to collect that acidic stuff. More humid air tends to rise so you could just blow the heated and dried air in from the bottom of the kiln and then top vent the acidic vapor straight out the nearest window.

Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) once said, 'It took me 7 days to get over the worst cold I ever had, but with proper medicine and rest, I was able to get over the next one in only 1 week'. The humor being, it took about the same time either way. In the U.S. Southeast (summer temps around 100F in the day, always near saturation at 100-percent relative humidity), a couple of my friends and I built a simple three-walled 'pavilion' structure to put poplar 1-inch planks in to 'air-dry'. We cut, run 1/8-inch strippers between layers, thousands of board feet, and in about 5-6 months, we could take 35-40 percent green poplar down to 10-12 percent wood water by simply running a barn fan (42-inch diameter 1 hp motor) at the end of the pavilion, blowing through the planks. I'm still not sure of the exact mechanics of how this worked due to the high relative humidity, but with no monetary investment beyond building the pavilion and the electricity to run the fan (pennies a day per thousand board-ft), I can't look a 'gift-kiln' in the mouth.

You can build a re-saw for cheap to cut your logs into boards or planks. All you do is mount 2 tires on a frame. One stationary with a motor and the other needs to have an adjustment from side to side for the tracking. The only part that might cost is a 4 inch band saw blade. The whole set up works just like a belt sander.

how to kiln dry firewood: 10 steps (with pictures) - wikihow

how to kiln dry firewood: 10 steps (with pictures) - wikihow

This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 31,887 times. Learn more...

Freshly milled lumber requires about a year to dry and cure before you can use it in construction. Even firewood takes at least six months before its ready to burn. If your lumber needs are more consistent, a home firewood kiln can cut this wait time down to a week or less.[1] X Research source Solar kilns or smaller boiler-based models will be the most accessible for home users. Commercial kilns are very large and can cost thousands of dollars.

building a wood kiln video series | wood-mizer usa

building a wood kiln video series | wood-mizer usa

This is a series of videos that will show how Nathan Elliott of Out of the Woods Forestryconstructed a chamber for his Wood-Mizer KD150 Kiln. In this first video, Nathan receives delivery of the wood kiln and introduces what to expect from the video series that will document the entire process of building a lumber drying kiln.Nathan also explains his reason for getting a kiln and his overall expectations.

design and operate a small-scale dehumidification kiln - woodworking | blog | videos | plans | how to

design and operate a small-scale dehumidification kiln - woodworking | blog | videos | plans | how to

Many articles have been dedicated to solar lumber kilns: everything from a simple sheet of Visqueen over a stack of lumber in the sunshine to elaborate enclosures designed for solar gain. The problems with solar kilns include limited control over temperature and limited solar exposure, depending on your region and site location. Additionally, I have been underwhelmed by the performance of solar-operated fans.

My aim was to develop a small dehumidification kiln for better control of the three key components of lumber drying: temperature, airflow and humidity. A dehumidification kiln makes sense particularly when the lumber is air-dried first. This limits the amount of energy needed to bring lumber to the desired 6% to 8% moisture content. Commercial scale steam kilns consume large amounts of energy. In contrast, a dehumidification kiln uses a sealed chamber, with only enough energy input to maintain the desired temperature. With a well-designed dehumidification kiln, hardwood lumber can be dried for mere pennies per board foot.

A shed kiln is an attractive alternative for a couple of reasons. It can be constructed in any style, with architectural features that match or complement an existing home. Built properly, a shed kiln may even increase the value of a property. I dont think the same could be said for an old reefer truck converted into a kiln (no matter how well it dries lumber). Another reason I like the idea of a shed kiln is the flexibility of future use. Minus the drying equipment, a shed kiln is just an insulated storage space, with a host of possible uses.

The first thing to consider when designing a shed kiln is size. Ideally, a lumber kiln would be large enough to dry multiple stacks of lumber. This lets the operator sort stacks by lumber species, so they will be easy to retrieve when the drying cycle is complete. Consider not only the space for the lumber stacks, but extra floor space to easily load and monitor the charge of lumber. Additionally, a 12 air plenum is required between the walls and stacks of lumber. This air space is absolutely critical for even airflow, so count on the extra floor space right from the design phase.

Many available kiln designs require a large, heavy door. My number one priority was to build a kiln that was easy to load and easy to monitor. For a single-stack kiln I recommend a minimum shed size of 8 x 12. This would allow a stack of lumber four feet wide and 10 feet long. The remaining width allows for a 36-wide door and space for your drying equipment.

For more capacity, consider a two stack kiln (12 x 12), or a three-stack kiln (12 x 16). Regardless of size, allow for a 36 door that opens to a hallway of open space. Changing the position of the doorway in various kiln setups helps provide the best access to the stacks of lumber.

Unlike general shop space, bigger is not always better for kiln design. If the interior volume of a kiln becomes too large, basic heaters and home dehumidifiers may be inadequate to control the kiln environment. For a small scale shed kiln, I recommend a maximum footprint of 200 square feet. Many regions have increased the shed and outbuilding maximum allowable size without need for a permit. Check your local building codes for regionally specific requirements and electrical permits.

My shed kiln was stick-built from standard building material, and sized to take advantage of typical 4 x 8 sheet goods. The cost associated with shed construction was similar to buying a prefabricated kit. In exchange for building the shed myself, I wound up with a shed of higher quality, with more features. A typical home center sheds floors are underbuilt for the weight of a load of lumber.

Another great option is to convert an existing shed or outbuilding to a lumber kiln. Any small building could work, as long as it has a minimum of 2 x 4 framing, and will seal out unwanted air. With advances in spray foam insulation, it may be possible to seal older, drafty structures as well. Consider the weight of the lumber that will be placed in the structure and fortify the building accordingly.

Construction of a kiln chamber is very similar to building a small house. Insulate the floor with 2 rigid foam for convenience and durability. Extruded polystyrene foam (blue or pink rigid foam) in this thickness has an R value of 10. To accommodate the floor insulation, blocking between joists is oriented horizontally instead of the normal vertical position. This serves a dual purpose of supporting the rigid foam insulation as well as stiffening the floor framing. Leave an air space between the rigid foam and subfloor for additional insulating properties. Insulation for walls and ceilings should be a minimum of R13.

Once the flooring deck is constructed, think about sealing the shed framing at every opportunity. A bead of silicone caulking between the subfloor and sill plate will prevent air infiltration. Lay down the bead of caulking before raising the walls. Corners where walls meet should be sealed with expanding foam sealant. Windows and doors are also sealed, as well as any holes cut for electrical service.

Installing a window in a kiln may seem counterintuitive at first, because windows lose more heat than an insulated wall. However, the natural light and ventilation offered by a small window outweighs any disadvantages. I recommend a 2 x 3 sliding window with bug screen. It should be double-pane, well-insulated with low emissivity (low-E).

Size and placement of the access door are critical as well. I selected a 36 outswing exterior door. An outswing door can always be opened, regardless of shed contents. A pre-hung steel exterior door is ideal in this situation, because it offers weatherstripping and is fully insulated.

Installing sheetrock and fire taping is a good idea for a heated room. The sheetrock also helps to protect the fiberglass insulation. Exterior sheathing and siding type also factors into the heat-holding ability of the structure. I chose double wall construction with 1/2 sheathing, and 1/2 T1-11 siding. Each layer adds approximately .81 R value. Staggering the seams between the sheathing and siding layers helps avoid air infiltration.

I also wrapped the shed with Tyvek HomeWrap. The membrane was taped and lapped to the weather so if the tape ever fails, any rain that gets behind the siding would still be shed down and away by the HomeWrap.

I opted not to install a true vapor barrier between the framing and sheetrock, because of potential condensation and mold issues with sheds constructed this way. This shed will be essentially unheated for much of the year and very hot during the kiln-drying cycles. A shed kiln has minimal venting (usually one or two gable vents) and sealed soffits. For these reasons, I feel it is best to let the shed breathe, and forgo a plastic vapor barrier.

Electrical requirements for a DIY kiln are pretty straightforward, but hiring an electrician is still a good idea. Add up the amp draw on all the equipment you plan to use in the kiln, including a heater, dehumidifier, fans and steam generator. Make sure the total amp draw is well within the limit of your electrical circuit. Dont even think of powering your kiln with an extension cord.

If you intend to kiln dry lumber from a green state, right off the sawmill, you will need to be well-versed in airflow rates and follow a detailed drying schedule. Drying lumber too quickly can lead to deep end checking, warping and case hardening. Case hardening is a defect caused by the outer portion of a board drying quickly, while the inner portion dries more slowly. This can create internal stress in the lumber that is released when sawing. If severe enough, the lumber can develop honeycomb cracks throughout.

However, if you kiln dry hardwood lumber that has already been air dried, the process is much more forgiving. Most species of hardwood lumber can be safely dried this way, once the moisture content is 20% to 25% or less. The fact is, most of my stacks of lumber air dry to 15% moisture content before entering the kiln. I hope that the sawyer coated the ends of the lumber with Anchor-Seal or oil-based paint when it was green. This slows the end-grain drying and limits the severity of end checking.

Attic fans are a perfect way to provide airflow over the stacks of lumber. They are normally mounted in the gable of household attics, and they are designed to be used in high temperature environments. My kiln uses four ceiling-mounted fans, each rated for 1,600 CFM. For single-stack kilns, stationary fans are adequate. With two-stack and three stack kilns, it is better to have reversible fans to alter the direction of airflow mid-cycle. This prevents dead spots inside the chamber that experience limited airflow.

Instead of using expensive electrically reversible fans designed for commercial kilns, I came up with a simple hardware solution. A lazy Susan with 180 detents mounts the fan box to the ceiling. I then manually rotate the fan boxes halfway through the drying cycle. Also, since heat rises, ceiling-mounted fans have the added benefit of circulating the warmest air over the lumber.

A household dehumidifier (DH) removes moisture from the kiln chamber. By setting the relative humidity (RH) on the dehumidifier, you can control how often it runs. A higher humidity setting will run the unit sporadically to maintain that RH. A lower RH setting will call for the DH to run more often. There are two ways to remove water from the DH unit, and they both work well. The water tray can be removed and emptied manually, or a hole can be drilled through the wall of the shed to pass a drain tube. This will allow the DH to drain automatically without you needing to enter the kiln. I prefer to empty the water tray manually and record the volume of water collected. This gives me a secondary method of tracking the drying process, using both water volume and moisture content (MC) readings.

A small electric heater supplies auxiliary heat to maintain adequate kiln temperature. In smaller kilns, the heat generated by the fans and DH motor is sufficient to maintain temperatures in excess of 100 degrees. In larger kilns, the heater may be needed in the latter part of the drying cycle. For all kiln drying schedules, a heater should be used to sterilize the lumber and kill any insects that may be present. For a kiln temperature of 140 F, sterilization takes three to five hours. With a 130 F kiln temperature, sterilization will take 10 to 12 hours (Dry Kiln Operators Manual, 1991). These figures hold true for lumber up to 2 thick. For sterilizing thicker lumber, additional time is required.

Select a heater with an adjustable thermostat and a tip-over shutoff. This will allow the heater to cycle on and off automatically, according to the kiln operators setting. A heavy-duty 1,500-watt space heater works fine.

Loading the kiln begins by rousing my sons and letting them know Ive planned a day of work. After a short period of grumbling, they join me to lay down wood blocks for the first layer of lumber. I like these starter blocks to raise the lumber a few inches off the floor. I either use some cedar 3 x 5, or 4 x 4 stock. The starter blocks should be as long as the stack is wide.

Each layer of lumber is separated from the next by a series of stickers or spacer sticks. The stickers are uniform in size and usually 3/4 or 1 square. Milling the stickers square is advantageous over a rectangular cross-section, because no matter how you place the stickers they will form a level stack. Another common sticker size is 1 x 2, and these work fine as well.

Place a sticker at each end, and every 16 along the stack for 4/4 stock. Sticker spacing can be increased to 24 apart for 5/4 or thicker hardwood. Align the stickers over the starter blocks on the first course. Then align each subsequent layer of stickers over the last. This helps keep the lumber straight during the drying cycle; in fact, improper placement of stickers can permanently deform lumber. The thinner the stock, the more critical sticker placement becomes.

Place some sample boards in the stack that will be easy to pull out for moisture testing later. Once all the lumber is stacked and stickered, place baffles over the lumber. The baffles direct airflow over and through the stack and prevent the top layers from drying too quickly. My four main baffles consist of sheets of 1 Styrofoam insulation. I made a simple frame from plywood strips and attached theinsulation sheets to them with screws and fender washers. This makes lightweight baffles that can be easily moved and repositioned.

Apply foil tape to the edges of the main baffles to help protect the Styrofoam. My baffles hang from T-bar assemblies mounted to the ceiling. The T-bars are made from 1/2 galvanized pipe and are attached to the rafters with threaded pipe flanges. To hang the baffles, simply attach hooks to the plywood frame. I found that brackets for mounting rigid metal electrical conduit work best. Select 3/4 conduit brackets for hanging baffles on 1/2 galvanized pipe.

If your lumber stack is built on starter blocks, you will need to limit airflow there as well. Place a 16 board on the floor behind the stack, tilted to a 45 angle. This kicker board will help distribute the airflow more evenly through all layers of lumber. Basically, you dont want all of the air rushing out under the stack, so find a way to redirect it. End baffles are also a good idea to prevent airflow from bypassing the stack entirely. For end baffles, I use 2-thick rigid foam insulation screwed to the main baffles. The baffles do not need insulating properties, and plywood would work just as well.

I cannot stress the importance of baffles enough. Without baffles, the top layers of lumber experience potato chipping with cupping, twisting or warping. This problem is magnified if the lumber is thin or flatsawn. Thicker lumber like 5/4 or quartersawn lumber is naturally more stable. In addition, weight on top of the stack can be helpful, but nothing replaces baffles for the best lumber yield. The last thing to do before starting the kiln is to close the gable vent with an insulated cover.

My kiln schedule starts with running all fans and the dehumidifier for two days, measuring and removing water as it accumulates. Initially, I set the DH to 40% RH, because I dont want to remove moisture too quickly. I usually see a large volume of water in the DH each night when I check the kiln.

An anemometer confirms that your effort constructing baffles was worthwhile. Measure airflow over the stacks of lumber in various locations. Air speed of 350 feet per minute is appropriate for common hardwoods such as oak and maple. Also check that air isnt escaping around the side baffles or under the stack of lumber. Adjust the baffles or fan direction to achieve good airflow.

After two days operating only the fans and DH, I take note of the temperature. (I have found that remotely monitoring the temperature and humidity with a WiFi sensor can be very helpful. Its a nice use of technology and adds a measure of safety as well.) If the fans and dehumidifer generate enough heat to maintain a temperature of 100 to 120 F, then I wont use the auxiliary heater. If the temperature is below this range, I start the heater and adjust the thermostat accordingly. After four days, I decrease the RH setting on the DH to 30% and continue to run the fans.

After seven to 10 days, I reverse the fan direction to make sure all stacks of lumber dry evenly. Soon the DH wont show much water collected in the tray. If MC readings still arent at the desired range, the heat may need to be increased for the remainder of the drying cycle. Remove samples from the stack, and cut an inch or two off one end. Take a moisture reading in the end grain with a pin-type moisture meter or remote probe. (I use the Mini-Ligno MD/C from Lignomat, www.lignomatusa.com.) Once the core readings are 6% to 8% on a fresh cut, the lumber is dry and ready for sterilization. Omitting the sterilization phase can lead to costly losses from insect damage, so dont skip it.

For the sterilization phase, air temperature needs to be around 140 F, for three to five hours. Take the electronics out of the kiln, and continue operating the heater and fans during this phase. The DH is not needed at this time, as the lumber is already bone-dry. I find that unplugging the DH is helpful during the sterilization phase so I can add a second heater, without overwhelming my electrical circuit.

Once the lumber is sterilized, it is ready for the conditioning phase. To condition the lumber, I introduce steam into the kiln for about two hours. This returns some moisture to the very dry exterior of the lumber, while not affecting the core moisture level. I use a Rockler steam generator, item #42826 (www.rockler.com). During the conditioning process, the only equipment operating are the fans, heater and the steam generator no dehumidifier.

Looking at the cost-benefit analysis of a shed kiln can be enlightening. On the last load of lumber I purchased, I saved $2.50 per board foot compared to retail prices for kiln-dried lumber. The order was 540 board feet (BF) of 5/4 white oak. On this order alone, I saved over $1,300 by drying the lumber myself. This, of course, is gross savings; we must calculate electrical costs to determine the net savings: in this case, about $62. Check out More On the Web for my complete calculations to figure savings.

If we revisit the example of a $1,300 gross savings from a load of 540 BF of white oak lumber, and we subtract the estimated cost of $62 to kiln dry the lumber, we arrive at a net savings of $1,238 less than retail. That purchase was an average deal, and one I dont consider a particular bargain. I often buy from sawyers or homeowners at 40% to 50% of retail price. Frequently, the lumber has already air-dried for several years in a barn or outbuilding. When that is the case, I know Ill have usable lumber in just a few weeks.

If you use a lot of lumber, and youre a decent hand at carpentry, a shed kiln will quickly pay for itself. Perhaps the best part: you wont need to calculate your lumber needs down to the board foot. Just walk out to the shed kiln and grab what you need from your custom-dried supply.

how to kiln dry wood | cut the wood

how to kiln dry wood | cut the wood

You need to dry wood to perfection to improve its strength and to prevent mold attacks due to trapped moisture inside the wood grain. And when it comes to drying or seasoning wood, there are two ways to do it.

You can use the air-drying technique that lets wood pieces dry with the aid of sunshine and air. Wood is stacked and left to the elements and this can take months to completely dry. But for faster wood drying, most woodworkers rely on kilns.Kilns are similar to conventional ovens. These dry wood using hot air. Most kilns are wood-fired and are so effective that it can season wood to perfection in just a few weeks.Kiln drying basicsYou may either have a kiln at home or you can have your wood dried from a local sawmill with a kiln. But if you plan to start drying more wood to be used as construction material or for firewood soon then it would be a good idea to construct your own kiln at your property.Things you will needWood to be driedMoisture meterStickersTarpKilnInstructions1) Use a moisture meter to find out the moisture content of your woodSource: https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/moisture-meter- .htmlThis will help establish a baseline value. A moisture meter is the most accurate test for determining a woods moisture content. It is a small handheld tool with two metal probes that are applied to wood. These probes read the moisture content of the surface as well as the internal part of the wood. The reading is expressed as the percentage of moisture according to the woods volume or weight.Use the moisture meter according to the manufacturers directions. The normal moisture content for wood used in woodworking projects is 6 or 7 percent. If you get a higher reading, it means that the wood needs to be dried and it is not ready to be used.2) Use stickers to dry the woodSource: https://homedesignersuite.co/quick-overview-of-home-designer-architectural-best-diy-home-design-software/Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Kilns are similar to conventional ovens. These dry wood using hot air. Most kilns are wood-fired and are so effective that it can season wood to perfection in just a few weeks.Kiln drying basicsYou may either have a kiln at home or you can have your wood dried from a local sawmill with a kiln. But if you plan to start drying more wood to be used as construction material or for firewood soon then it would be a good idea to construct your own kiln at your property.Things you will needWood to be driedMoisture meterStickersTarpKilnInstructions1) Use a moisture meter to find out the moisture content of your woodSource: https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/moisture-meter- .htmlThis will help establish a baseline value. A moisture meter is the most accurate test for determining a woods moisture content. It is a small handheld tool with two metal probes that are applied to wood. These probes read the moisture content of the surface as well as the internal part of the wood. The reading is expressed as the percentage of moisture according to the woods volume or weight.Use the moisture meter according to the manufacturers directions. The normal moisture content for wood used in woodworking projects is 6 or 7 percent. If you get a higher reading, it means that the wood needs to be dried and it is not ready to be used.2) Use stickers to dry the woodSource: https://homedesignersuite.co/quick-overview-of-home-designer-architectural-best-diy-home-design-software/Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

You may either have a kiln at home or you can have your wood dried from a local sawmill with a kiln. But if you plan to start drying more wood to be used as construction material or for firewood soon then it would be a good idea to construct your own kiln at your property.

Source: https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/moisture-meter- .htmlThis will help establish a baseline value. A moisture meter is the most accurate test for determining a woods moisture content. It is a small handheld tool with two metal probes that are applied to wood. These probes read the moisture content of the surface as well as the internal part of the wood. The reading is expressed as the percentage of moisture according to the woods volume or weight.Use the moisture meter according to the manufacturers directions. The normal moisture content for wood used in woodworking projects is 6 or 7 percent. If you get a higher reading, it means that the wood needs to be dried and it is not ready to be used.2) Use stickers to dry the woodSource: https://homedesignersuite.co/quick-overview-of-home-designer-architectural-best-diy-home-design-software/Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

This will help establish a baseline value. A moisture meter is the most accurate test for determining a woods moisture content. It is a small handheld tool with two metal probes that are applied to wood. These probes read the moisture content of the surface as well as the internal part of the wood. The reading is expressed as the percentage of moisture according to the woods volume or weight.Use the moisture meter according to the manufacturers directions. The normal moisture content for wood used in woodworking projects is 6 or 7 percent. If you get a higher reading, it means that the wood needs to be dried and it is not ready to be used.2) Use stickers to dry the woodSource: https://homedesignersuite.co/quick-overview-of-home-designer-architectural-best-diy-home-design-software/Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Use the moisture meter according to the manufacturers directions. The normal moisture content for wood used in woodworking projects is 6 or 7 percent. If you get a higher reading, it means that the wood needs to be dried and it is not ready to be used.

Source: https://homedesignersuite.co/quick-overview-of-home-designer-architectural-best-diy-home-design-software/Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Stickers are simply 1 x 2 (25 x 50 mm) pieces of lumber that are used to provide airflow between the boards you are drying. Lay each sticker about 16 inches (40 cm) apart and line them up parallel to each other. Youll need enough stickers to support the entire length of the boards you are drying.Stack the first layer of boards. Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Carefully set the first layer of wooden boards on top of the stickers, running them perpendicular to the stickers. Leave an inch or so of space between each board to allow for increased airflow.3) Preparing the kilnSource: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/42967 68/?lp=trueAllow the kiln to reach the ideal maximum temperature to dry wood. Close the kiln door to keep the temperature inside the chamber. Use a thermometer to find out the temperature inside the chamber.Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Once the kiln has reached the ideal temperature, place the wood one by one inside the kiln. If you have metal grates inside the kiln then you can arrange wood in such a way that no part of each wood touches the other pieces. This will greatly improve drying and will ensure that all the surfaces of the wood pieces are exposed to the hot air.Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Take care that your kiln does not run out of fuel so that it can maintain the temperature inside the chamber. Most kilns are wood-fired so be ready with a large stack of wood nearby just in case you need to refuel.4) Test the moisture level of your woodSource: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Source: https://wonderfulengineering.com/10-best-wood-moisture-meters/ Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Take two pieces of wood from the kiln and test it. If the results show high moisture levels, return the pieces inside the kiln and dry some more.5) Post kiln careSource: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Source: https://napoleonfireplaces.com/the-spectacular-science-of-stacking-firewood/ Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Once the wood is ready, remove it from the kiln and stack these in a neat pile. Use stickers (small pieces of wood) when you stack your newly dried wood. Place a row of stickers on top of the boards, lining these directly with the previous set of stickers.Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Continue alternating stickers and boards until youve stacked every piece of wood. You may store the wood inside your garage or tool shed but if you must let these remain outdoors, cover the drying wood with a tarp or other overhanging fabric.ConclusionKiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

Kiln drying will be able to dry wood fast and in a more efficient manner. It can reduce drying times and can make wood ready for use in just weeks compared to months when you air dry. It would also be good to have a moisture meter whether you are air drying or kiln drying wood.

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