magnetic jumpers

coax feeders, jumpers & connectors - rosenberger group

coax feeders, jumpers & connectors - rosenberger group

High-tech companies rely on the precision and reliability of Rosenbergers high quality products. The Rosenberger group invests strategically in the development of new high-quality products, in the most advanced manufacturing and business processes, in resource conservation and environmental protection.

Rosenberger products stand for precision, durability and quality at the highest level. The company has considerable expertise in the automotive sector from two decades of designing and producing both customized solutions and standard products.

The Rosenberger Group, as a development partner in the field of industrial measurement technology, designs and manufactures high-quality precision products for use in various measurement technology applications.

Rosenberger is an experienced connection solutions partner to customers in the Medical and Industrial sectors. With a global presence, the company provides a comprehensive portfolio of innovative, high quality connection products backed by extensive professional services.

Intelligent business processes in the industrial sector require professional end-to-end solutions. Rosenberger serves the entire process chain with sophisticated hardware and software while also providing associated services for the respective business environments.

Since 1991, Rosenberger Optical Solutions & Infrastructure (Rosenberger OSI) - as a member of the Rosenberger Group - has been a recognized expert for fiber-based connectivity, cabling solutions and infrastructure services in the areas of data centers, local area networks, mobile networks and industrial applications.

The companys custom machining capability is highly impressive, providing maximum flexibility and resilience in terms of capacity utilization and logistics. In addition to extensive problem-solving, the Rosenberger Group offers production processes that are tailored to specific customer requirements.

As a renowned manufacturer, the name Rosenberger is associated with the most advanced technology, quality and creativity. The Rosenberger Group provides a wide range of standardized and customized connectivity solutions in high-frequency and fiber optic technologies.

The demand for high-speed data transmission in global mobile networks continues to grow rapidly. The choice of connectivity products or solutions between the BBU/PSU, RRH and antenna is an essential key element to achieve the best network performance.

More than 11,300 employees work for the Rosenberger Group worldwide every day - 2,300 of them at our headquarters in Fridolfing. With their commitment and competence they are responsible for the success and the future of the company. You too can become an indispensable part of our team!

The cable construction is similar for all cable sizes: Inner conductor, foam dielectric, outer conductor and outer jacket. The cables are available as standard with either a PE jacket for outdoor installations or in a flame retardant and halogen-free version to comply with indoor requirements for health and safety, IEC 60332 and CPR-EN 50575.

Rosenberger coaxial jumpers have been designed using the many years of experience gained by Rosenberger engineers in this field. The unique knowledge of designing and manufacturing world-leading PIM testing equipment is directly reflected in the jumpers.

Rosenberger jumpers have the industry-best PIM levels: -117 dBm / -160 dBc @ 2 x 20 W (typ. -120 dBm / -163 dBc @ 2 x 20 W). These excellent levels are guaranteed for every assembly that leaves the Rosenberger production facility.

Rosenberger connectors are designed for ease of attachment while providing consistent industry leading performance. The connectors have excellent mechanical and environmental properties that ensure long-term durability and performance both in indoor and outdoor environments.

All Rosenberger connectors are coated with a specially selected flash white bronze over silver plating. This coating is specifically selected to provide protection against oxidation while delivering exceptional performance and electrical conductivity.

magnetic connectors - rosenberger group

magnetic connectors - rosenberger group

High-tech companies rely on the precision and reliability of Rosenbergers high quality products. The Rosenberger group invests strategically in the development of new high-quality products, in the most advanced manufacturing and business processes, in resource conservation and environmental protection.

Rosenberger products stand for precision, durability and quality at the highest level. The company has considerable expertise in the automotive sector from two decades of designing and producing both customized solutions and standard products.

The Rosenberger Group, as a development partner in the field of industrial measurement technology, designs and manufactures high-quality precision products for use in various measurement technology applications.

Rosenberger is an experienced connection solutions partner to customers in the Medical and Industrial sectors. With a global presence, the company provides a comprehensive portfolio of innovative, high quality connection products backed by extensive professional services.

Intelligent business processes in the industrial sector require professional end-to-end solutions. Rosenberger serves the entire process chain with sophisticated hardware and software while also providing associated services for the respective business environments.

Since 1991, Rosenberger Optical Solutions & Infrastructure (Rosenberger OSI) - as a member of the Rosenberger Group - has been a recognized expert for fiber-based connectivity, cabling solutions and infrastructure services in the areas of data centers, local area networks, mobile networks and industrial applications.

The companys custom machining capability is highly impressive, providing maximum flexibility and resilience in terms of capacity utilization and logistics. In addition to extensive problem-solving, the Rosenberger Group offers production processes that are tailored to specific customer requirements.

As a renowned manufacturer, the name Rosenberger is associated with the most advanced technology, quality and creativity. The Rosenberger Group provides a wide range of standardized and customized connectivity solutions in high-frequency and fiber optic technologies.

The demand for high-speed data transmission in global mobile networks continues to grow rapidly. The choice of connectivity products or solutions between the BBU/PSU, RRH and antenna is an essential key element to achieve the best network performance.

More than 11,300 employees work for the Rosenberger Group worldwide every day - 2,300 of them at our headquarters in Fridolfing. With their commitment and competence they are responsible for the success and the future of the company. You too can become an indispensable part of our team!

Rosenberger has developed a product family that offers an intelligent alternative to mechanical mating. Our magnetic self-mating connector series provides all common functions and is suitable for power and data transmission.

Self-mating works as follows: When the plug is approaching the socket, it is attracted by the magnetic force and virtually slides into the socket by itself. This makes it an efficient and comfortable handling and ensures a correct connection.

The break-away function is designed to break the connection should the plug or cable be subjected to an acute tensile force (intentional or unintentional). This avoids the risk of injury to the user and damage to the connectors. The deliberate removal of the plug is also fast and simple due to the break-away function.

The magnetic break-away function is highly suited to medical environments protecting patients, hospital staff and equipment from harm. Use cases and applications include nurse calling systems, patient monitoring, patient infotainment, and the administration of hospidal beds, wheel chairs, AED and surgical appliances.

Both autonomous charging by traditional contacts and inductive solutions is supported. At the same time, the self-mating and break-away functions enable portable multi-site data acquisition. These features greatly simplify connections in hard to reach environments such as those found in UAV's, including drones and robots, as well as ruggedized tablets and many industrial service and maintenance applications.

For electrical personal mobility products such as e-bikes, e-scooters, skateboards and watercraft, magnetic self-mating and locking makes battery swapping and charging much more user-friendly. Reliable data transmission and acquisitionalso makes it ideal for many consumer electronics applications including USB and LAN.

geniac (electric brain) replica : 10 steps (with pictures) - instructables

geniac (electric brain) replica : 10 steps (with pictures) - instructables

GENIAC, which stood for "GENIus Almost-automatic Computer", was an educational toy billed as a "computer" sold from 1955 through the sixties for about $20. Designed and marketed by Edmund C. Berkeley, with Oliver Garfield, it was widely advertised in science and electronics magazines. GENIAC provided many youths of the day with their first exposure to computer concepts and Boolean logic.

Sold as a kit, GENIAC consisted of a Masonite back panel with six areas of concentric perforations, six similarly perforated Masonite disks, and some additional hardware listed in the supplies section below.

Slotted brass bolts were positioned on the main back panel in such a way that brass "jumpers" inserted into the underside of the Masonite disks would create electrical connections when the disks were rotated over them. The bolts were wired together along with a battery and some lights to create "programs", basically single purpose "machines".

Technically GENIAC was a collection of configurable N-pole by N-throw rotary switches, which could be set up to cascaded and thus perform logical functions. As a result GENIAC could use combinational logic only, its outputs depending entirely on inputs manually set. However, projects outlined in the manual, which started with basic logic circuits, ultimately progressed to such things as a NIM machine and TIC-TAC-TOE machine.

This Instructable outlines how I made my GENIAC Replica, and includes all the CAD files and instructions necessary so that you can make one too. I did not have an original model to work from as they are quite rare and fairly expensive (if you can even find them on the vintage markets). My replica is based on the GENIAC manuals and photos available online.

There are two models presented here. The "Classic" version as seen above is a pretty close facsimile to the original GENIAC. I've used hardboard instead of Masonite for the base and disks, and the jumpers are not brass plates but are mostly 3D printed. Otherwise I was able to source parts that pretty closely match the pictures online. With the second version presented later in this Instructable, I have taken some liberties to improve on the original, especially with respect to the reliability of the mechanical switches.

Using the attached "cut" files, create one Main Board and six Switch Tops. I used 1/8 inch (3 mm) hardboard which I laser cut at my local maker space (check out the awesome Kwartslab). I haven't tried it, but you should be able to mill these pieces as well. I would not recommend trying to manually produce them as the precision required for the switches to work reliably is quite high.

Despite looking at many online images, and scouring the GENIAC manual I was never able to find a picture of what the brass jumpers looked like. The manual describes pushing the jumper "arms" through adjacent holes along a spoke on the disks and bending them over to hold the jumper in place (see the excerpt from the manual above). Also I believe that various versions of GENIAC used slightly different types of jumpers. So in the end, after some trial and error, I designed and 3D printed my own. They seem to work reasonably well.

Update August 10, 2019 Al Williams from Hackaday was kind enough to send me a photo (seen above) of a brass jumper from his GENIAC. I'm going to try to make a few and will update this Instructable with my results.

After you have carefully removed the supports from the 3D printed Wire Jumper parts, you need to attach a short length of copper wire to the underside. This is what will complete the circuit between pairs of brass bolt heads mounted on the main board.

Attach the wire to the shallow groove in the bottom of the printed Wire Jumper pieces as in the photo above. I used a liquid gel super glue for this and it worked well. Note: Be careful not to get glue on the exposed part of the wire. I spent some time "debugging" my first GENIAC "machine" only to finally realize that one of the copper wires was coated with a thin layer of invisible insulation since the glue I used dries clear!

If you have completed the previous steps, and acquired the other parts, you should be ready to create a GENIAC machine. I built "THE TRANSLATOR FROM BINARY TO DECIMAL" project found on page 40 of the "Manual for Geniac Electric Brain Construction Kit", with the wiring diagram on the last page of the "Supplementary Wiring Diagrams" booklet. The completed machine can be seen below.

Start by inserting the brass bolts into the base board from the top in the positions indicated by the black dots on the diagram. Hold them in place with a single nut from below tightened enough so that the bolt will no longer turn in place. Be sure that the slots on the heads of the bolts are precisely aligned with the center point of the cluster. The second picture above is for the 1's switch area of the base. Place a second nut loosely on the bolt. This will be used to hold the wires in place.

Install the battery holder, light socket, and blade switch onto the main board. I used some M3 x 8 mm bolts and nuts for the battery holder, and 1/8 inch x 1 inch bolts and nuts for the other two. See the main photo at the top of the Instructable for a suggested placement.

Use the diagram above to wire the machine. The wires should be firmly held in place between the two nuts on the back of each bolt. With few exceptions there will only be one wire attached to each bolt. The third picture above is the back of the Binary to Decimal Translator fully wired.

Attach the Wire Jumpers to the undersides of the Switch Top disks. On the diagram the appropriate spots are indicated with small rectangles. Push the legs of the jumpers through the holes of the disk from the bottom and secure them in place with the Locking Tabs on the tops (one of which should be a Locking Tab With a Pointer). The last two pictures above show the underside and the top of the 1's switch.

Mount the switch tops to the main board with the 3/16 inch x 1 1/4 inch bolts. Slide one of the washers onto the bolt followed by the switch top and a Disk Spacer. Push this assembly through the appropriate hole in the base and hold it in place with a second washer then two nuts (the second acting as a lock washer). The switch top should rotate freely and you should feel and hear a "click" when the Wire Jumpers snap into the slots on the bolt heads.

Turn on the machine. If you have built the Binary to Decimal Translator as I did, you can test it by setting the four binary switches to either one or zero (say to 1100 for example) then turning the decimal switch slowly until the light turns on. The number pointed to when the light goes on is the decimal equivalent (12 in this case).,

You should hear an audible click and feel the switch lock in place when you have correctly lined up the jumpers and the bolt slots. If your machine does not work as expected start by checking the wiring. Use a multi-meter to verify each of the connections. Make sure that when the switch is locked in place the expected bolt pairs conduct a current. As already mentioned make sure the jumpers do not have excess glue insulating the copper wire.

Despite the fact that my 3D printed jumpers worked way better than expected, they are not 100% reliable. Anecdotally I understand that the original GENIAC was not any better. I wanted to apply some lessons that I learned from building my Mostly 3D Printed Rotary Switch.

So GENIAC Redux was born. The brass bolts have been replaced by magnetic reed switches and the jumpers with magnets. Additional magnets are employed to create the "detents" or "stops" to make sure that the reed switches and magnets align at the proper positions. I used "markerboard", hardboard with a dry erase surface on one side, for the base and switch disks. Finally just for fun I designed my own battery and switch holders.

When the Magnetic Jumpers have been printed, populate them with the disk magnets. The reason that I suggest using two colors for these is so that you can insert all the magnets into one color of the Magnetic Jumpers with one polarity, and the use the opposite polarity for all the others. This way the different color Magnetic Jumpers will always attract making it easier when you are setting up the switches later. My magnets friction fit pretty well. Use a bit of glue as necessary.

Insert the magnetic reed switches into the Pole Top printed pieces. Start by cutting short lengths (about 1 inch) of 22 AWG solid wire. Slide two pieces of wire into the shaft holes of the Pole Top. Bend the leads from the reed switches in towards the center until they are at about a 30 degree angle to the bottom. Line the wires from the Pole Top up with the bent leads and solder them together. Try not to leave too much excess solder. The second photo above shows the setup just prior to soldering. Gently press the reed switch down towards the Pole Top until it rests part of the way into the slot. Image three show what this should look like when done. At this point its a good idea to test the reed switch with a multi-meter and magnet to make sure it's working as expected.

For this example I chose the "THE FOX, HEN, CORN, AND THE HIRED HAND - THE FARMER'S MACHINE" project found on page 14 of the "Manual for Geniac Electric Brain Construction Kit", with the wiring diagram in the "Supplementary Wiring Diagrams" booklet. The completed machine can be seen below.

In this case, for each pair of adjacent black dots on the diagram, we will be inserting a Pole Top piece assembled in the previous step from the top of the main board. From the underside of the board slide a Pole Bottom over the shafts protruding through the holes. Screw two of the M3 x 8 mm bolts part way into the Pole Bottom holes. Wrap the wires from the magnetic reed switch around the bolt between the Pole Bottom and the head, then secure the bolt in place with an M3 nut. Loosely screw a second nut onto the bolts to be used when attaching wires. See the second photo above for details. It's a good idea at this point to double check that the reed switch is working properly using a multi-meter.

Install the battery holder, two light sockets, and the switch onto the main board. I used some M3 x 8 mm bolts and nuts for the battery holder and switch, and 1/8 inch x 1 inch bolts and nuts for the two light sockets. Use photo three as a guide to placement.

Use the diagram above to wire the machine. The wires should be firmly held in place between the two nuts on the back of each bolt attached to the Pole Bottoms. With few exceptions there will only be one wire attached to each bolt. The fourth picture above is the back of the Farmer's Machine fully wired. Once the wiring was done I attached the two Stand pieces to either side of the main board with M3 x 8 mm bolts.

Attach the Magnetic Jumpers to the undersides of the Switch Top disks. On the diagram the appropriate spots are indicated with small rectangles. Push the legs of the jumpers through the holes of the disk from the bottom and secure them in place with the Locking Tabs on the tops (one of which should be a Locking Tab With a Pointer).

Additional magnets are attached to the main board and to the underside of the switch tops to act as "detents" or "stops" so that the reed switches and magnets line up properly when the switch is rotated. These detent magnets are installed in pairs so that the pull on the switch is balanced. The fifth picture above shows the main board top for the corn area with the reed switches and detent magnets attached. The corresponding corn switch can be seen from the bottom in the last photo with the grouped pair of magnets acting as jumpers and the two additional magnets for the detents. Notice that I am using different colored Magnetic Jumpers for the base and switch to ensure that the polarity for each will be different an thus will attract when aligned.

As with the Classic GENIAC mount the switch tops to the main board with the 3/16 inch x 1 1/4 inch bolts. Slide one of the washers onto the bolt followed by the switch top and a Disk Spacer. Push this assembly through the appropriate hole in the base and hold it in place with a second washer then two nuts (the second nut acting as a lock washer). The switch top should rotate freely. In this case you will not hear a click but will definitely feel when the magnets align with their corresponding opposites.

Turn on the machine. Try rotating the various switches between Barn 1 and Barn 2. You should feel the switches snap into place when they are aligned properly. If the Fox and Hen or the Hen and the Corn are ever in a barn without the Man the Danger light should turn on. Otherwise the Safety light will be on. Unlike the Classic machine, you should never have an issue with the reed switch not making proper contact. If there are problems check the wiring.

I mean they called it an Electric Brain. That sets a pretty high bar. I'm sure that there were many eager recipients that were disappointed with the reality of GENIAC. However, the kit as sold was not without its merits. Since it did not require soldering and was battery powered it was accessible to a large audience, especially children say 12 and older. GENIAC was certainly a reasonable tool for teaching electric circuits, Boolean logic, as well as binary and decimal arithmetic. Plus as postulated in his lecture "I sing the story Electric" (linked above) Brian Moriarty points to GENIAC as an early example of interactive narrative. Without a doubt GENIAC was an important early (1955) step on the road to general computer literacy.

As with my other replica projects my goal here is to shed some new light on an important part of our non-digital computer related past. Kudos to Edmund C. Berkeley and Oliver Garfield for their work. I'm sure that GENIAC helped to set a significant number of young people on the road to computer related careers.

I think there's something wrong with the DXF files. Two firms I've used in the past came up with errors. One read the measurements for the main board in inches (over 3 feet wide), the other on millimeters (about 2 inches wide). I tried printing them, but the holes don't line up. If you're not looking to do a kit, can you at least recommend someone who can actually produce these?

If you are interested in Geniacs you must've seen Digi-Comp I. Are you aware of http://www.mindsontoys.com/dc1_main.htm? You can buy their re-engineered, modern version of the classic Digi-Comp I for a quite-reasonable price.

I had a Digi-Comp I as a kid. A few years back I purchased the Minds-On Toys version. More recently I built this version from Thingiverse:https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1477209This is what actually got me interested in making replicas of these great old devices.

When I was a kid, my parents offered me a construction game by Philips called Mechanical Engineering Kit ME1201. I spent so many hours bulding cranes, 4WD cars and a lot of things, that I recently bought 2 (but not complete) on Ebay. There are wheels with holes to insert pins, springs, axles, all of different sizes, a perfect base to build mechanical protos. I'm going to make your converter and will post a picture. Thanks a lot for this diving in the past.

I too had one of these as a kid in the 60's. My grandfather got it for me, what a blast from the past. I remember building things and making the lights change. Too cool to find this! I still have some of the little brass jumpers and the insulators.

I didnt ever have one of these growing up but I remember wanting one. Only took me 50+ years to accomplish that goal :-). My 60s toy was a Digi-Comp I and thanks to this Thing: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1477209I have a new one of those now too. Thanks for sharing.

Fantastic! I had a Geniac when I was a child. Ive occasionally thought of trying to reproduce it, but as you note, the precision required for the drilling is a bit daunting- and no doubt the reason for the price of the original.

Ive wondered about the price. $20 in 1955 is about $191 in todays dollars. My time aside all of the materials and parts came to maybe $30 for the Classic version. So maybe the labor of creating the base and disks plus they did a lot of advertising explains the difference. Or maybe they just had a great profit margin :-). Having access to a laser cutter certainly made the difference for me when I decided to tackle this project.

connectors, edgecards and sockets - molex

connectors, edgecards and sockets - molex

Find the wire-to-board connector that best fits your application needs. Molex has a variety of wire-to-board connectors that offer a wide range of solutions for high-power or microminiature applications.

Molex is a registered trademark of Molex, LLC in the United States of America and may be registered in other countries; all other trademarks listed herein belong to their respective owners.

the strongest universal magnetic charging cable | one universal magnetic charger for phones and laptops | volta charger

the strongest universal magnetic charging cable | one universal magnetic charger for phones and laptops | volta charger

The cable comes in this really sleek feeling/looking container and it houses all of the required materials + cable. I had no issues with using the cable, the magnetic adapters are terrific and have the right amount of pull, without being too hard to take out of devices you have placed it in and also feels sturdy when slotted into your devices. I plan on buying the smaller wattage cable with some USB+USBC tips next time it is in stock!

I love the way it is so easy to use. The case with it lets you put it in your daily carry pack. The three tips are always at hand or can be left in your devices you use on a regular basis. Keep up the superior work!

The cable works perfectly and delivers maximum power both to my MacBook and phone. The MagSafe connector makes me feel safer when being around my charging laptop and reduces usb-c connector wear (I just leave the tip inside). Having many tips is invaluable to switch quickly between charging different devices.

Even though I was skeptical purchasing these at the $32-per-cable kit price, it was worth it. The cable is excellently made and exceeded my expectations for build quality. The LED is very thoughtful and the carrying case is a nice touch. If I had one complaint, it is that I couldnt get the cable in white. Other than that no qualms. The tips that are inserted in the device are very compact and fit well in each device Ive tested (iPad Air 4, iPhone 8+ and pixel 4a). The cable is longer than expected and very flexible. Charging is quick and magnet is strong enough to stay connected when device is at the edge of a table and cable is arced downward. Just wish they were sold locally - but will definitely be picking up more. Shipping fast (DHL) and reasonable considering the distance. I also didnt know how to use the cable ties and they sent a vid showing the secret of how to attach to cables. 100% Satisfied. Amazing how much better things are to use when made well.

brilliant invention! I am really convinced and immediately stocked up with 4 cables, 3 power bricks and a lot of tips. everything works perfectly except for the possibility to use the cable properly in the car. I have to restart the iphone every time I get into the car to establish a carplay connection between the iphone and the car. otherwise he won't find a connection ... let's see what the support says about it. I really hope that there is a simple solution to the problem. (current status from June 1st, 2021)

geniale erfindung! Ich bin echt berzeugt und habe mich sofort mit 4 kabeln, 3 power bricks und einer menge tips eingedeckt. alles funktioniert perfekt bis auf die mglichkeit das kabel ordentlich im auto zu nutzen. ich muss jedes mal beim einsteigen ins auto das iphone neustarten um eine carplay verbindung zwischen iphone und auto herzustellen. sonst findet er keine verbindung... mal sehen was der support dazu sagt. ich hoffe ja echt das es eine einfache lsung fr das problem gibt. (aktueller stand vom 1. juni 2021)

The magnetic system, like Apples old MagSafe connectors, of course gives you the added benefit of safety by disconnecting and preventing any damage to your devices if you or someone else happens to trip over the cable.

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