manchester high quality gangue flotation cell manufacturer

flotation cell - an overview | sciencedirect topics

flotation cell - an overview | sciencedirect topics

The MAC flotation cell was developed by Kadant-Lamort Inc. It can save energy comparedto conventional flotation systems. The MAC flotation cell is mainly used in the flotation section of waste paper deinking pulping, for removal of hydrophobic impurities such as filler, ash,ink particles, etc. It can increase pulp whiteness and meet the requirements of final paper appearance quality. Table11.11 shows the features of MAC flotation cell. Kadants MAC flotation cell deinking system uses air bubbles to float ink particles to the cell surface for removal from the recycled material. The latest generation of the MAC cell deinking system incorporates a patented bubble-washing process to reduce power consumption and also fiber loss. It combines small, new, auto-clean, low-pressure injectors with a flotation cell. The function of injectors is to aerate the stock before it is pumped and sent tangentially to the top of the cell. The air bubbles collect ink particles in the cell and rise up to the top to create a thick foam mat that is evacuated because of the slight pressurization of the cell. The partially deinked stock then goes to a deaeration chamber and is pumped to the next stage. Here, the operation is exactly the same as for the first stage. This stage also has the same number of injectors and same flow (Kadant,2011). This operation is repeated up to five times for a high ink removal rate. Remixing of the air coming from downstream stages of the process helps the upstream stages and improves the overall cell efficiency. Adjustable and selective losses of fiberdepend on the application and technical requirements inks, or inks and fillers. The use of low-pressure injectors in the MAC flotation cell could save about 2530% of the energy used in conventional flotation systems (ECOTARGET,2009). The benefits of the MAC flotation cell are summarized in Table11.12.

Agitated flotation cells are widely used in the mineral processing industry for separating, recovering, and concentrating valuable particulate material from undesired gangue. Their performance is lowered, however, when part of the particulate system consists of fines, with particle diameters typically in the range from 30 to 100m. For example, it was observed difficult to float fine particles because of the reduction of middle particles (of wolframite) as carriers and the poor collision and attachment between fine particles and air bubbles; a new kinetic model was proposed [34].

As an alternative to agitated cells, bubble columnsused in chemical engineering practice as chemical reactorswere proposed for the treatment of fine particle systems. Flotation columns, as they came to be known, were invented back in the 1960s in Canada [35]. The main feature that differentiates the column from the mechanical flotation cell (of Denver type) is wash water, added at the top of the froth. It was thought to be beneficial to overall column performance since it helps clean the froth from any entrained gangue, while at the same time preventing water from the pulp flowing into the concentrate. In this way, it was hoped that certain cleaning flotation stages could be gained.

Let us note that the perhaps insistence here on mineral processing is only due to the fact that most of the available literature on flotation is from this area, where the process was originated and being widely practiced. The effect of particle size on flotation recovery is significant; it was shown that there exists a certain size range in which optimum results may be obtained in mineral processing. This range varies with the mineral properties such as density, liberation, and so on, but was said to be of the order of 10100m [36].

Regulating the oxidation state of pyrite (FeS2) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS), by the addition of an oxidation or reduction chemical agent and due to the application of a short-chain xanthate as collector (such as potassium ethyl xanthate, KEX), was the key to selective separation of the two sulfide minerals, pyrite and arsenopyrite [37]. Strong oxidizing agents can depress previously floated arsenopyrite. Various reagents were examined separately as modifiers and among them were sodium metabisulfite, hydrazinium sulfate, and magnesia mixture. The laboratory experiments were carried out in a modified Hallimond tube, assisted by zeta-potential measurements and, in certain cases, by contact angle measurements.

This conventional bench-scale flotation cell provides a fast, convenient, and low-cost method, based on small samples (around 2g), usually of pure minerals and also artificial mixtures, for determining the general conditions under which minerals may be rendered floatableoften in the absence of a frother (to collect the concentrate in the side tube) [38]. This idea was later further modified in the lab replacing the diaphragm, in order to conduct dissolved air or electroflotation testssee Section 3.

Pyrite concentrates sometimes contain considerable amounts of arsenic. Since they are usually used for the production of sulfuric acid, this is undesirable from the environmental point of view. However, gold is often associated with arsenopyrite, often exhibiting a direct relationship between Au content and As grade. There is, therefore, some scope for concentrating arsenopyrite since the ore itself is otherwise of little value (see Fig.2.2). Note that previous work on pyrites usually concentrated on the problem of floating pyrite [40].

In the aforementioned figure (shown as example), the following conditions were applied: (1) collector [2-coco 2-methyl ammonium chloride] 42mg/L, frother (EtOH) 0.15% (v/v), superficial liquid velocity uL=1.02cm/s, superficial gas velocity uG=0.65cm/s, superficial wash water velocity uw=0.53cm/s; (2) hexadecylamine, 45mg/L; pine oil, 50mg/L; EtOH, 0.025%; uL=0.84cm/s; uG=0.72cm/s; uw=0.66cm/s; (3) Armoflot 43, 50mg/L; pine oil, 50mg/L; EtOH, 0.025%; uL=0.84cm/s; uG=0.71cm/s; uw=0.66cm/s [39]. The pyrite (with a relatively important Au content of 21g/ton) was a xanthate-floated concentrate. The presence of xanthates, however, might cause problems in the subsequent cyanidation of pyrites when recovering their Au value, which perhaps justified the need to find alternative collectors. In general, the amines exhibited a behavior similar to that of the xanthates (O-alkyl dithiocarbonates). The benefit of the amine was in its lower consumption, as compared with the xanthate systems.

The arsenic content of the pyrite was approximately 9% (from an initial 3.5% of the mixed sulfide ore). The material was sieved and the75m fraction was used for the laboratory-scale cylindrical column experiments. The effect on metallurgical characteristics of the flotation concentrate of varying the amount of ferric sulfate added to the pulp was studied; three collectors were used and their performance was compared (in Fig.2.2). Both hexadecylamine and Armoflot 43 (manufactured by Akzo) exhibited an increased recovery but a very low enrichment, whereas 2-coco 2-methyl ammonium chloride (Arquad-2C) showed a considerable enrichment; a compromise had to be made, therefore, between a high-grade and a low recovery.

Electroflotation (electrolytic flotation) is an unconventional separation process owing its name to the bubbles generation method it uses, i.e., electrolysis of the aqueous medium. In the bottom of the microcell, the two horizontal electrodes were made from stainless steel, the upper one being perforated. The current density applied was 300 Am2. It was observed that with lime used to control pH, different behavior was observed (see Fig.2.3). Pyrite, with permanganate (a known depressant) also as modifier, remained activated from pH 5.0 to 8.0at 80% recovery, while it was depressed at the pH range from 9.0 to 12.0. A conditioning of 30min was applied in the presence of modifier alone and further 15min after the addition of xanthate. The pure mineral sample, previously hand collected, crushed, and pulverized in the laboratory, was separated by wet sieving to the45 to+25m particle size range.

Pyrite due to its very heterogeneous surface, consisting of a mosaic of anodic and cathodic areas, presents a strong electrocatalytic activity in the anodic oxidation of xanthate to dixanthogen. It is also possible that the presence of the electric field, during electroflotation, affected the reactions taking place. In order to explain this difference in flotation behavior thermodynamic calculations for the system Fe-EX-H2O have been done [41]. It was concluded that electroflotation was capable of removing fine pyrite particles from a dilute dispersion, under controlled conditions. Nevertheless, dispersed air and electroflotation presented apparent differences for the same application.

The size of the gas bubbles produced was of the order of 50m, in diameter [21]. Similar measurements were later carried out at Newcastle, Australia [42]; where it was also noted that a feature of electroflotation is the ability to create very fine bubbles, which are known to improve flotation performance of fine particles.

In fact, the two electrodes of a horizontal electrodes set, usually applied in electroflotation, could be separated by a cation exchange membrane, as only one of the produced gases is often necessary [43]. In the lower part/separated electrode, an electrolyte was circulated to remove the created gas, and in the meantime, increase the conductivity; hence having power savings (as the electric field is built up between the electrodes through the use of the suspension conductivity). Attention should be paid in this case to anode corrosion, mainly by the chloride ion (i.e., seawater).

Microorganisms have a tremendous influence on their environment through the transfer of energy, charge, and materials across a complex biotic mineralsolution interface; the biomodification of mineral surfaces involves the complex action of microorganism on the mineral surface [44]. Mixed cationic/anionic surfactants are also generating increasing attention as effective collectors during the flotation of valuable minerals (i.e., muscovite, feldspar, and spodumene ores); the depression mechanisms on gangue minerals, such as quartz, were focused [45].

Another design of a flotation cell which applies ultrasound during the flotation process has been developed by Vargas-Hernndez et al. (2002). The design consists of a Denver cell (Koh and Schwarz, 2006) equipped with ultrasonic capabilities of performing ultrasound-assisted flotation experiments. This cell is universally accepted as a standard cell for laboratory flotation experiments. In Figure 35.25, a schematic of the Denver cell equipped with two power transducers is shown operating at 20kHz. The ultrasonic transducers are in acoustic contact with the body of the flotation cell but are not immersed in the same cell. Instead, they are submerged in distilled water and in a thin membrane that separates the radiant head of the transducer from the chamber body. The floatation chamber has a capacity of 2.7l and is also equipped with conventional systems to introduce air and mechanical agitation able to maintain the suspension of metallurgical pulp. In the upper part of the cell there is an area in which the foam is recovered for analysis by a process called skimming. The block diagram of Figure 35.25 further shows that the experimental system was developed to do ultrasonic-assisted flotation experiments. The transducers operate at 20kHz and can handle power up to 400W. In the Denver cell an acoustic probe, calibrated through a nonlinear system and capable of measuring high-intensity acoustic fields, is placed (Gaete-Garretn et al., 1993, 1998). This is done in order to determine the different acoustic field intensities with a spatial scanner during the experimentation. Figure 35.26 shows the distribution of ultrasonic field intensity obtained by a spatial scanner in the central area of the flotation chamber. The Denver cell with ultrasonic capabilities, as described, is shown in Figure 35.27. The obtained results were fairly positive. For example, for fine particle recovery it worked with metallurgical pulp under 325mesh, indicating floating particles of less than 45m, and the recovery curves are almost identical to those of an appropriate size mineral for flotation. This is shown in Figure 35.28, where a comparison between typical copper recovery curves for fine and normal particles is presented. The most interesting part of the flotation curves is the increase in recovery of molybdenum with ultrasonic power, as shown in Figure 35.29. The increase in recovery of iron is not good news for copper mines because the more iron floating the lower grade of recovery. This may be because the iron becomes more hydrophobic with ultrasonic action. According to the experts, this situation could be remedied by looking for specific additives to avoid this effect. Flotation kinetics shown in Figure 35.30 with 5 and 10W of acoustic power applied also show an excellent performance. It should be noted that the acoustic powers used to vary the flotation kinetics have been quite low and could clearly be expanded.

Figure 35.28. Compared recovering percent versus applied power in an ultrasonic-assisted flotation process in a Denver cell: (a) fine and ultrafine particles recovering and (b) normal particles recovering.

These experiments confirm the potential of power ultrasound in flotation. Research on assisted flotation with power ultrasound has been also carried out by Ozkan (2002), who has conducted experiments by pretreating pulp with ultrasound during flotation. Ozkhans objective was to recover magnesite from magnesite silts with particles smaller than 38m. Their results show that under ultrasonic fields the flotation foam bubbles are smaller, improving magnesite recovery rates. When Ozkhan treated magnesite mineral with a conventional treatment the beneficial effect of ultrasound was only manifested for mineral pretreatment. The flotation performed under ultrasonic field did not show improvement. This was because power ultrasound improves the buoyancy of clay iron and this has the effect of lowering the recovery of magnesite.

Kyllnen et al. (2004) employed a cell similar to Jordan to float heavy metals from contaminated soils in a continuous process. In their experiments they obtained a high recovery of heavy metals, improving the soil treatment process. Alp et al. (2004) have employed ultrasonic waves in the flotation of tincal minerals (borax Na O710 B4 H2O), finding the same effects as described above, i.e., that power ultrasound helps in the depression of clay. However, the beneficial effect of ultrasound is weakened when working with pulps with high mineral concentration (high density), probably due to an increase in the attenuation of the ultrasonic field. Safak and Halit (2006) investigated the action mechanisms of ultrasound under different flotation conditions. A cleaning effect on the floating particles was attributed to the ultrasonic energy, making the particles more reactive to the additives put in the metallurgical pulp. Furthermore due to the fact that the solid liquid interface is weaker than the cohesive forces of the metallurgic pulp liquids, it results in a medium favorable to creation of cavitation bubbles. The unstable conditions of a cavitation environment can produce changes in the collectors and even form emulsions when entering the surfactant additives. In general, many good properties are attributed to the application of ultrasound in flotation. For example, there is a more uniform distribution of the additives (reagents) and an increase in their activity. In fact in the case of carbon flotation it has been found that the floating times are shortened by the action of ultrasound, the bubble sizes are more stable, and the consumption of the reagents is drastically lowered.

Abrego Lpez (2006) studied a water recovery process of sludge from industrial plants. For this purpose he employed a flotation cell assisted by power ultrasound. In the first stage he made a flotation to recover heavy metals in the metallurgical pulp, obtaining a high level of recovery. In the second stage he added eucalyptus wood cones to the metallurgical pulp to act as an accumulator of copper, lead, nickel, iron, and aluminum. The author patented the method, claiming that it obtained an excellent recovery of all elements needing to be extracted. zkan and Kuyumcu (2007) showed some design principles for experimental flotation cells, proposing to equip a Denver flotation cell with four power transducers. Tests performed with this equipment consisted of evaluating the possible effects that high-intensity ultrasonic fields generated in the cell may have on the flotation. The author provides three-dimensional curves of ultrasonic cavitation fields in a Denver cell filled with water at frequencies between 25 and 40kHz. A warming effect was found, as expected. However, he states that this effect does not disturb the carbon recovery processes because carbon flotation rarely exceeds 5min. They also found that the pH of tap water increases with the power and time of application of ultrasound, while the pH of the carbonwaterreagentsludge mixture decreases. The conductivity of the metallurgical pulp grows with the power and time of application of ultrasound, but this does not affect flotation. The carbon quality obtained does not fall due to the application of ultrasound and the consumption of lowered reagents. They did not find an influence from the ultrasound frequency used in the process, between 25 and 40kHz. They affirmed that ultrasound is beneficial at all stages of concentration.

Kang et al. (2009) studied the effects of preconditioning of carbon mineral pulp in nature by ultrasound with a lot of sulfur content. They found that the nascent oxygen caused by cavitation produces pyrite over oxidation, lowering its hydrophobicity, with the same effect on the change of pH induced by ultrasonic treatment. Additionally, ultrasound decreases the liquid gas interfacial tension by increasing the number of bubbles. Similar effects occur in carbon particles. The perfect flotation index increases 25% with ultrasonic treatment. Kang et al. (2008) continued their efforts to understand the mechanism that causes effects in ultrasonic flotation, analyzing the floating particles under an ultrasonic field by different techniques like X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. In carbon flotation it is estimated that ultrasonic preconditioning may contribute to desulfurization and ash removal (deashing) in carbon minerals. Zhou et al. (2009) have investigated the role of cavitation bubbles created by hydrodynamic cavitation in a flotation process, finding similar results to those reported for ultrasonic cavitation flotation. Finally, Ozkan (2012) has conducted flotation experiments with the presence of hard carbon sludge cavitation (slimes), encountering many of the effects that have been reported for the case of metallurgical pulp with ultrasound pretreatment. This includes improved flotation, drastic reduction in reagent consumption, and the possible prevention of oxidation of the surface of carbon sludge. A decrease in the ash content in floating carbon was not detected. However, tailings do not seem to contain carbon particles. All these effects can be attributed to acoustic cavitation. However, according to the author, there is a need to examine the contribution of ultrasound to the probability of particlebubble collision and the likelihood of getting the bubbles to connect to the particles. The latter effects have been proposed as causes for improvements in flotation processes in many of the publications reviewed, but there is no systematic study of this aspect.

In summary, power ultrasound assistance with flotation processes shows promising results in all versions of this technique, including conditioning metallurgical pulp before floating it, assisting the continuous flotation process, and improving the yields in conventional flotation cells. The results of ultrasonic floating invariably show a better selectivity and an increase, sometimes considerable, in the recovery of fine particles. Paradoxically, in many experiments an increase has been recorded in recovering particles suitable for normal flotation. These facts show the need for further research in the flotation process in almost all cases, with the exception perhaps of carbon flotation. For this last case, in light of the existing data the research should be directed toward scale-up of the technology.

The concentrate obtained from a batch flotation cell changes in character with time as the particles floating change in size, grade and quantity. In the same way, the concentrate from the last few cells in a continuous bank is different from that removed from the earlier cells. Particles of the same mineral float at different rates due to different particle characteristics and cell conditions.

The recovery of any particular mineral rises to an asymptotic value R which is generally less than 100%. The rate of recovery at time t is given by the slope of the tangent to the curve at t, and the rate of recovery at time t1 is clearly greater than the rate at time t2. There is a direct relationship between the rate of flotation and the amount of floatable material remaining in the cell, that is:

The process is carried out in a flotation cell or tank, of which there are two basic types, mechanical and pneumatic. Within each of these categories, there are two subtypes, those that operate as a single cell, and those that are operated as a series or bank of cells. A bank of cells (Fig. 8) is preferred because this makes the overall residence times more uniform (i.e., more like plug flow), rather than the highly diverse residence times that occur in a single (perfectly mixed) tank.

FIGURE 8. Flotation section of a 80,000t/d concentrating plant, showing the arrangement of the flotation cells into banks. A small part of the grinding section can be seen through the gap in the wall. [Courtesy Joy Manufacturing Co.]

The purpose of the flotation cell is to attach hydrophobic particles to air bubbles, so that they can float to the surface, form a froth, and can be removed. To do this, a flotation machine must maintain the particles in suspension, generate and disperse air bubbles, promote bubbleparticle collision, minimize bypass and dead spaces, minimize mechanical passage of particles to the froth, and have sufficient froth depth to allow nonhydrophobic (hydrophilic) particles to return to the suspension.

Pneumatic cells have no mechanical components in the cell. Agitation is generally by the inflow of air and/or slurry, and air bubbles are usually introduced by an injector. Until comparatively recently, their use was very restricted. However, the development of column flotation has seen a resurgence of this type of cell in a wider, but still restricted, range of applications. While the total volume of cell is still of the same order as that of a conventional mechanical cell, the floor space and energy requirements are substantially reduced. But the main advantage is that the cell provides superior countercurrent flow to that obtained in a traditional circuit (see Fig. 11), and so they are now often used as cleaning units.

Mechanical cells usually consist of long troughs with a series of mechanisms. Although the design details of the mechanisms vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, all consist of an impeller that rotates within baffles. Air is drawn or pumped down a central shaft and is dispersed by the impeller. Cells also vary in profile, degree of baffling, the extent of walling between mechanisms, and the discharge of froth from the top of the cell.

Selection of equipment is based on performance (represented by grade and recovery), capacity (metric tons per hour per cubic meter); costs (including capital, power, maintenance), and subjective factors.

Among all processing industries, only in the ore and mining industries is the accent more on wear resistance than corrosion. In mining industries, the process concerns material handling more than any physical or chemical conversions that take place during the refining operations. For example, in the excavation process of iron ore, conventional conveyer systems and sophisticated fluidized systems are both used [16,17]. In all these industries, cost and safety are the governing factors. In a fluidized system, the particles are transported as slurry using screw pumps through large pipes. These pipes and connected fittings are subjected to constant wear by the slurry containing hard minerals. Sometimes, depending on the accessibility of the mineral source, elaborate piping systems will be laid. As a high-output industry any disruption in the work will result in heavy budgetary deficiency. Antiabrasive rubber linings greatly enhance the life of equipment and reduce the maintenance cost. The scope for antiabrasive rubber lining is tremendous and the demand is ever increasing in these industries.

Different rubber compounds are used in the manufacture of flotation cell rubber components for various corrosion and abrasion duty conditions. Flotation as applied to mineral processing is a process of concentration of finely divided ores in which the valuable and worthless minerals are completely separated from each other. Concentration takes place from the adhesion of some species of solids to air bubbles and wetting of the other series of solids by water. The solids adhering to air bubbles float on the surface of the pulp because of a decrease in effective density caused by such adhesion, whereas those solids that are wetted by water in the pulp remain separated in the pulp. This method is probably the more widely used separation technique in the processing of ores. It is extensively used in the copper, zinc, nickel, cobalt, and molybdenum sections of the mineral treatment industry and is used to a lesser extent in gold and iron production. The various rubber compounds used in the lining of flotation cells and in the manufacture of their components for corrosive and abrasive duties are:

Operating above the maximum capacity can cause the performance of flotation cells to be poor even when adequate slurry residence time is available (Lynch et al., 1981). For example, Fig. 11.21 shows the impact of increasing volumetric feed flow rate on cell performance (Luttrell et al., 1999). The test data obtained at 2% solids correlates well with the theoretical performance curve predicted using a mixed reactor model (Levenspiel, 1972). Under this loading, coal recovery steadily decreased as feed rate increased due to a reduction in residence time. However, as the solids content was increased to 10% solids, the recovery dropped sharply and deviated substantially from the theoretical curve due to froth overloading. This problem can be particularly severe in coal flotation due to the high concentration of fast floating solids in the flotation feed and the presence of large particles in the flotation froth. Flotation columns are particularly sensitive to froth loading due to the small specific surface area (ratio of cross-sectional area to volume) for these units.

Theoretical studies indicate that loading capacity (i.e., carrying capacity) of the froth, which is normally reported in terms of the rate of dry solids floated per unit cross-sectional area, is strongly dependent on the size of particles in the froth (Sastri, 1996). Studies and extensive test work conducted by Eriez personnel also support this finding. As seen in Fig. 11.22, a direct correlation exists between capacity and both the mean size (d50) and ultrafines content of the flotation feedstock. The true loading capacity may be estimated from laboratory and pilot-scale flotation tests by conducting experiments as a function of feed solids content (Finch and Dobby, 1990). Field surveys indicate that conventional flotation machines can be operated with loading capacities of up to 1.52.0t/h/m2 for finer (0.150mm) feeds and 56t/h/m2 or more for coarser (0.600mm) feeds. Most of the full-scale columns in the coal industry operate at froth loading capacities less than 1.5t/h/m2 for material finer than 0.150mm and as high as 3.0t/h/m2 for flotation feed having a top size of 0.300mm feeds.

Froth handling is a major problem in coal flotation. Concentrates containing large amounts of ultrafine (<0.045mm) coal generally become excessively stable, creating serious problems related to backup in launders and downstream handling. Bethell and Luttrell (2005) demonstrated that coarser deslime froths readily collapsed, but finer froths had the tendency to remain stable for an indefinite period of time. Attempts made to overcome this problem by selecting weaker frothers or reducing frother dosage have not been successful and have generally led to lower circuit recoveries. Therefore, several circuit modifications have been adopted by the coal industry to deal with the froth stability problem. For example, froth launders need to be considerably oversized with steep slopes to reduce backup. Adequate vertical head must also be provided between the launder and downstream dewatering operations. In addition, piping and chute work must be designed such that the air can escape as the froth travels from the flotation circuit to the next unit operation.

Figure 11.23 shows how small changes in piping arrangements can result in better process performance. Shown in Fig. 11.23 is a column whose performance suffered due to the inability to move the froth product from the column launder although a large discharge nozzle (11m) had been provided. In this example, the froth built up in the launder and overflowed when the operators increased air rates. To prevent this problem, the air rates were lowered, which resulted in less than optimum coal recovery. It was determined that the downstream discharge piping was air-locking and preventing the launders from properly draining. The piping was replaced with larger chute work that allowed the froth to flow freely and the air to escape. As a result, higher aeration rates were possible and recoveries were significantly improved.

Some installations have resorted to using defoaming agents or high-pressure launder sprays to deal with froth stability. However, newer column installations eliminate this problem by including large de-aeration tanks to allow time for the froth to collapse (Fig. 11.24a). Special provisions may also be required to ensure that downstream dewatering units can accept the large froth volumes. For example, standard screen-bowl centrifuges equipped with 100mm inlets may need to be retrofitted with 200mm or larger inlets to minimize flow restrictions. In addition, while the use of screen-bowl centrifuges provides low product moistures, there are typically fine coal losses, as a large portion of the float product finer than 0.045mm is lost as main effluent. This material is highly hydrophobic and will typically accumulate on top of the thickener as a very stable froth layer, which increases the probability that the process water quality will become contaminated (i.e., black water).

This phenomenon is more prevalent in by-zero circuits, especially when the screen-bowl screen effluent is recycled back through the flotation circuit, either directly or through convoluted plant circuitry. Reintroducing material that has already been floated to the flotation circuit can result in a circulating load of very fine and highly floatable material. As a result, the capacity of the flotation equipment can be significantly reduced, which results in losses of valuable coal. Most installations will combat this by ensuring that the screen-bowl screen effluent is routed directly back to the screen bowl so that it does not return to the flotation circuit. The accumulation of froth on the thickener, which tends to be especially problematic in by-zero circuitry, is also reduced by utilizing reverse-weirs and taller center wells, as this approach helps to limit the amount of froth that can enter into the process water supply. Froth that does form on top of the clarifier can be eliminated by employing a floating boom that is placed directly in the thickener (Fig. 11.24b) and used in conjunction with water sprays. The floating boom can be constructed out of inexpensive PVC piping, and is typically attached to the rotating rakes. The boom floats on the water interface and drags any froth around to the walkway that extends over the thickener, where it is eliminated by the sprays.

Column cells have been developed over the past 30 years as an alternative to mechanically agitated flotation cells. The major operating difference between column and mechanical cells is the lack of agitation in column cells that reduces energy and maintenance costs. Also, it has been reported that the cost of installing a column flotation circuit is approximately 2540% less than an equivalent mechanical flotation circuit (Murdock et al., 1991). Improved metallurgical performance of column cells in iron ore flotation is reported and attributed to froth washing, which reduces the loss of fine iron minerals entrained into the froth phase (Dobby, 2002).

The Brazilian iron ore industry has embraced the use of column flotation cells for reducing the silica content of iron concentrates. Several companies, including Samarco Minerao S.A., Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (CRVD), Companhia Siderrgica Nacional (CSN), and Mineraes Brasileiras (MBR), are using column cells at present (Peres et al., 2007). Samarco Minerao, the first Brazilian producer to use column cells, installed column cells as part of a plant expansion program in the early 1990s (Viana et al., 1991). Pilot plant tests showed that utilization of a column recleaner circuit led to a 4% increase in iron recovery in the direct reduction concentrate and an increase in primary mill capacity when compared to a conventional mechanical circuit.

There are also some negative reports of the use of column cells in the literature. According to Dobby (2002), there were several failures in the application of column cells in the iron ore industry primarily due to issues related to scale-up. At CVRD's Samitri concentrator, after three column flotation stages, namely, rougher, cleaner, and recleaner, a secondary circuit of mechanical cells was still required to produce the final concentrate.

Imhof et al. (2005) detailed the use of pneumatic flotation cells to treat a magnetic separation stream of a magnetite ore by reverse flotation to reduce the silica content of the concentrate to below 1.5%. From laboratory testing, they claimed that the pneumatic cells performed better than either conventional mechanical cells or column cells. The pneumatic cells have successfully been implemented at the Compaia Minera Huasco's iron ore pellet plant.

This chapter presents a novel approach to establish the relationship between collector properties and the flotation behavior of goal in various flotation cells. Coal flotation selectivity can be improved if collector selection is primarily based on information obtained from prior contact angle and zeta potential measurements. In a study described in the chapter, this approach was applied to develop specific collectors for particular coals. A good correlation was obtained between laboratory batches and large-scale conventional flotation cells. This is not the case when these results are correlated with pneumatic cell trial data. The study described in the chapter was aimed at identifying reasons for the noncorrelation. Two collectors having different chemical compositions were selected for this investigation. A considerable reduction in coal recovery occurred at lower rotor speeds when comparing results of oxidized and virgin coal. The degree to which a collector enhances flocculation in both medium- and low-shear applications and also the stronger bubble-coal particle adherence required for high-shear cells must, therefore, all be taken into consideration when formulating a collector for coal flotation.

column flotation | flsmidth

column flotation | flsmidth

Our modernised product line offers improved metallurgical performance and modular, customisable designs through our configure-to-order (CTO) program, designed to fit the individual needs of each process.

Expanding on the historic supply of Pyramid flotation columns, our modernised column cell offering includes design elements focused on improved metallurgical performance and enhanced mechanical design. This approach considers the main elements of column flotation: froth washing, froth recovery, residence time, cross-sectional area requirements, aspect ratio and column sparging. The end goal is to combine each into an overall design that becomes more than the sum of its parts. Following a configured-to-order design approach, the Column Flotation Cell minimises engineering at order and reduces CAPEX and supply lead times.

Fundamental understanding of column cell operation allows for effective column sizing and selection of functional features to ensure proper operation and integration into customers flow sheets. This integration can extend as far as inclusion of expert control systems to allow for enhanced overall flotation circuit operation and performance. Further circuit optimization is possible by combining the Column Flotation Cell with other FLSmidth flotation products.

A modular construction design minimises engineering costs and improved delivery timing. Fabrication costs are also reduced and Column Flotation Cell components can be readily containerised for delivery to site.

A stable and deep froth layer is maintained by level sensing elements that allow for advanced controls to ensure effective froth washing. This effectively removes gangue material, improving the grade in the process producing on-specification final product.

High recoveries are made possible by the Column Flotation Cells ideal hydrodynamic environment. Grade performance is enhanced by the Column Flotation Cells ability to maintain a deeper froth layer and improve washing to remove gangue material.

The design elements of column flotation make it unique among flotation techniques. Considerations include froth washing effects, froth recovery, residence time, cross-sectional area requirements, aspect ratio and column sparging.

Primary contacting occurs among relatively quiescent plug flow conditions within the vessel to promote recovery specifically for coarser particle sizes. Secondary, external, high-intensity contacting promotes bubble-particle collision, which result in attachment rates that optimise fine particle recovery.

FLSmidth columns feature venturi-style inline spargers. As the slurry is pumped into the slurry header, it distributes evenly between the spargers. The air header injects air individually into each sparger.

Air is sheared into the slurry under dynamic pressure changes, providing high-intensity contacting with the bubbles. Compared to traditional jet-nozzle spargers, this method enhances collision and attachment rates, greatly improving fines recovery.

The externally mounted sparging system, including a recirculation pump and spargers, offers ease of maintenance by eliminating the need to enter the tank. Optional sparger isolation valves allow the spargers to be serviced online.

Column flotation produces very well-defined, deep and stable froth layers that are washed with the application of percolating water from above, displacing gangue particles such as silicates and carbonates. Thorough washing results in superior final product quality.

Our Column Flotation Cell solutions are equipped with unparalleled monitoring controls. Normally, these types of controls supervise critical operating parameters like froth depth, wash water flow control, air supply and more to ensure the process is always optimised.

FLSmidth provides sustainable productivity to the global mining and cement industries. We deliver market-leading engineering, equipment and service solutions that enable our customers to improve performance, drive down costs and reduce environmental impact. Our operations span the globe and we are close to 10,200 employees, present in more than 60 countries. In 2020, FLSmidth generated revenue of DKK 16.4 billion. MissionZero is our sustainability ambition towards zero emissions in mining and cement by 2030.

garrett motion / turbo technology / electric & hybrid / connected vehicle

garrett motion / turbo technology / electric & hybrid / connected vehicle

Garretts advanced Model-Based Predictive Control (MPC) technology adopted by Hyundai is able to predict and preemptively optimize how a system operates in real-world conditions, enabling all types of light and commercial vehicles, whether ICE, hybrid, battery electric, or hydrogen fuel cell powered, to improve performance, efficiency and reliability.

Garretts recognized expertise in transformative technologies has never been more crucial. Learn more about how our teams are responsibly enabling cleaner, safer vehicles in our 2020 Sustainability Report.

Garretts two-stage VNT turbochargers, or VNT-VNT (variable nozzle/geometry turbos at both the high and low-pressure stages) are boosting BMW Groups more efficient, cleaner and powerful new diesel engine with great results.

Learn how Garrett has converted what was developed for high-end Motorsport into a launch with a major OEM in 2021, how that can be adapted for premium road vehicles and ultimately used in the mass market.

Garrett built its foundation on the pursuit of quality and measurable performance results, and motorsport is invaluable in connecting more directly with its customers, demonstrating new technologies, and developing engineering talent.

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j&m manufacturing | farm equipment manufacturer

j&m manufacturing | farm equipment manufacturer

A portion of the proceeds generated from each piece of equipment benefits national nonprofit organizations that provide assistance to farm families who have experienced a major injury, illness or disaster or mobilize veterans to transition them from military service to farming.

We have been a leading manufacturer of farm equipment since 1960, providing better solutions that continue to help farmers increase their bottom line. We've seen the changing landscape of farming over the years first hand, because we are farmers too. It is our passion to continually provide innovative and highquality products that make the task at hand easier and more productive for many years to come. Not just for our farm, but for your farm as well.

From the front folding auger for greater visibility to the V-Belt conveyors for hassle free maintenance, our many patented and innovative ideas are designed to make farming easier and more productive, helping you maximize your profits.

Cutting corners or sacrificing quality has never been the way we do business. Precision processes, durable finishes and heavier components ensure that our equipment will stand up to the toughest demands year after year. Our products are truly "Built To Last".

We are farm equipment manufacturers who have developed a reputation for outstanding customer service that is unmatched throughout the industry. Our customers understand and appreciate our ability to resolve any issues quickly and fairly with honesty, integrity and full understanding of their situation. It is one of the many reasons customers have continued to purchase our products from one generation to the next.

A portion of the proceeds generated from each piece of equipment benefits national nonprofit organizations that provide assistance to farm families who have experienced a major injury, illness or disaster or mobilize veterans to transition them from military service to farming.

Since J&M's first patented front-folding corner auger grain cart was introduced in the late 1980s, weve been designing and building innovative grain carts that help farmers maximize their operating efficiency. J&M offers classic front fold, X-Tended Reach single auger, or X-Tended Reach dual auger grain carts to give you, the farmer, options to suit your needs.

J&M's premium "LC Series" self-filling bulk tender design offer a Larger Capacity tank, Luxury Controls, Lower Center of Gravity and Longer Conveyor compared to competitor models. These features allow you to arry more seed with a lower center of gravity for safer transport over the road. The patented V-belt conveyor design transfers seed quickly and gently with greater efficiency, while the longer conveyor lengths can reach the tallest and widest planters with ease.

J&Ms new Stabilizer Trax System provides superior performance while reducing maintenance and increasing cart life. The Stabilizer Trax System features raised idler wheels under light loads, while making full contact under heavy loads to utilize the entire track footprint to minimize compaction. Raised idler wheels reduce tread wear, require less turning force and can easily climb over uneven terrain. The new Trax System also has improved bogie wheel spacing to distribute the load more evenly for uniform tread wear.

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