mining industry globally

mining - globaldata

mining - globaldata

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mining news and industry magazine | global mining review

mining news and industry magazine | global mining review

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Tailings are an ever-present problem on the global mining market. A case study in Brazil shows the potential of filter presses with the latest control system becoming a gamechanger in handling this issue.

mining industry - introduction to mining financial concepts

mining industry - introduction to mining financial concepts

The mining industry is involved in the extraction of precious minerals and other geological materials. The extracted materials are transformed into a mineralized form that serves an economic benefit to the prospector or miner. Typical activities in the mining industry include metals production, metals investing, and metals trading.

Mining assetsTypes of AssetsCommon types of assets include current, non-current, physical, intangible, operating, and non-operating. Correctly identifying and can be divided into two main categories: projects and operating mines.

The purpose of exploration is to find ores that are economically viable to mine. It begins with locating mineral anomalies, after which discovering and sampling confirms or denies that there is a find. It can be further proven through drilling programs and resource definition.

Once a potential mine is proven to be viable, the planning and construction phase begins with applying for and obtaining permits, continuing economic studies, and refining mine plans. Infrastructure development also takes place at this stage as mines are often located in remote areas that require construction of roads and electricity.

Once the operation is ready to begin, the asset officially becomes an operating mine. During this phase, the ore is extracted, processed, and refined to produce metal. This section forms the bulk of the focus of the financial model for an operating mine. Once all the ore has been extracted, the mine closure process begins, which can last for several years. The process includes clean-up, reclamation, and environmental monitoring.

A mining companys main assets are its reserves and resources, which are the ores that contain economic materials that are viable to mine. It is important to be able to read a reserve and resource statement and understand what information needs to be pulled from it to make the financial model. The table below contains information used to produce the annual cash flow that we build up in the financial model.

If you look at the table from right to left, you are moving in increasing geologic certainty, meaning that geologists are becoming more confident about the amount of material that is contained in the ground. Moving from the bottom to top, you are increasing the economic viability, meaning that the ore at the top is more economically attractive to mine than the ore at the bottom.

In conclusion, the inferred resource is the least geologically certain and the least economically viable to mine, while the proven resource is the most geologically certain and the most economically viable to mine.

As we build a financial model, it is important to think about which part of the table we are pulling information from. We should risk-adjust the different components of the table to reflect the risks associated with them. Typically, an inferred resource will be excluded from the economic model due to the high degree of uncertainty associated with it.

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2021 global mining investment outlook | e & mj

2021 global mining investment outlook | e & mj

Last year was a challenging year to say the least, but also one that presented opportunities for 2021 and beyond. A year ago, the mining sector was ramping up with regard to capital expenditures, with plans for about a 12% increase in capital spending for the year, continuing a trend of increased capital spending, which started at the bottom of the cycle in 2017 (metal prices had hit lows in late 2016). All of that changed when the COVID-19 pandemic threw a wrench into the global economy in March 2020. Mining firms have been recalibrating business plans since.

Companies learned, very quickly, how to operate safely in the pandemic environment. This includes working at a social distance or remotely. New technological advancements in the form of process or equipment modifications have been accelerated in this environment, which is giving way to opportunities for companies offering automation, digitalization, remote access or related services.

To conserve cash, most mining firms deferred capital expenditures and halted or slowed project activity in 2020. GDP growth, an important leading indicator for capital spending in the mining industry, is estimated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to have declined by about 4.9% in 2020.

As of the end of 2020, the number of metals and mining industry projects impacted by the pandemic exceeded 1,600, representing $212 billion, according to surveys conducted by Industrial Info. About 66% of that is for mining projects, with the remainder being for downstream processing and smelting sectors. The good news is that most of these projects are merely being delayed as opposed to canceled. Most delays range from three to 18 months, with a lot of project development being pushed into 2021-2022 timeframe.

Overall capital spending in 2020 ended down about 3% when compared to 2019. Now, that doesnt seem so bad, all things considered. And indeed, the mining industry is faring much better than other sectors, such as oil and gas, during this downturn.

Government financial stimulus and an early and strong recovery in China have lessened the impact and paved the way for what should be a much-improved 2021. Metals prices have improved significantly from early 2020 lows. The IMF is forecasting GDP growth for 2021 to be in the 5.4% range. This bodes well for amplified capital expenditures in 2021 and Industrial Info is expecting at least a 10% to 15% increase based on what we are hearing from mining firms.

As a safe haven investment, gold reached a historic high price in 2020, exceeding $2,000 per ounce (oz) for the first time. The price of gold has essentially doubled since hitting the bottom of the market at the end of 2016. This is incentivizing investment in gold mining projects and operating gold mines to increase production where possible to take advantage of the favorable price environment. Industrial Info is tracking more than 2,000 gold mining projects totaling $170 billion worldwide.

Prices for other metals improved as well. Copper and iron ore prices reached seven-year highs as 2020 concluded. Miners worldwide welcomed these higher prices, which will provide the impetus to invest.

There are several reasons to be optimistic about capital spending in 2021 and beyond. The long-term drivers of spending, such as population growth, urbanization, and electrification, remain intact, and will continue to drive demand for metals and minerals. And while COVID cases continue to rise, the number of vaccines being released and distributed is bringing hope that there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Globally, there are more than 13,000 active capital projects in the mining industry, representing $1.18 trillion in total investment value, according to Industrial Infos Business Intelligence. These are projects that run from the early exploration stages, through planning, engineering and construction. Researchers have noted increased activity in projects reaching the feasibility stage, as well as projects reaching the approval/engineering stages and even those going to construction.

Last year marked the lowest number of new mines coming online since Industrial Info has been tracking these stats. Roughly 240 mines came online in 2020 compared with 520 during 2014. There are many reasons for the decline. Easy-to-access resources are dwindling. New mines tend to be more remote, expensive and difficult to permit. Where possible, mining firms are looking to life extension projects and new satellite open-pit or underground mines at existing assets rather than building new mines. There also was a significant capital outlay for new mines built during the mining boom peaking in 2014 and companies have been concentrating on optimizing production from those assets. For 2021, new mine construction, including grassroot mine and brownfields, account for 20% of current projects, while in-plant expansions, additions, retrofits, modernizations, automation and maintenance projects account for 80% of the projects in 2021.

The pandemic blues of 2020 will be replaced by decarbonization fever in 2021. The transition toward electric powered vehicles will continue to accelerate. General Motors, for example, plans to spend $2.5 billion retrofitting its plant in Tennessee for electric vehicle production. In the long term, projects like this will require more batteries, fuel cells and other technology and will increase demand for energy transition metals including lithium, cobalt, graphite, nickel, aluminum and others. Electric vehicles are projected to require at least four times as much copper content as conventional automobiles.

Despite the rosy long-term outlook for electric vehicle demand and thus battery raw material prices, the lithium market has been on a downtrend for the past two years. Prices for lithium surged over 2016 and 2017, but additional capacity expansions outstripped demand growth between 2018 and 2019, triggering a slump in prices.

The COVID-19 pandemic added further bearish pressure to lithium prices in 2020. The result has been some capacity idling and planned expansions deferred until the market returns. Nevertheless, theres a large number of lithium mining and processing projects planned from the exploration stage through to advanced planning.

Mining companies are increasingly installing captive power plants or outsourcing to build/own/operate companies to supply power. More and more, these plants are fueled by renewables, mainly solar and wind, along with hybrid installations with battery storage, and are getting away from diesel fuel. Industrial Info is tracking about 870 projects totaling $36 billion in power generation projects pertaining to mines.

Accounting for 27% share of global electricity production and an important steelmaking ingredient, coal represents the largest sector for investment in the mining industry accounting for 24% of the project spending. After coal, copper, precious metals, iron ore and potash/phosphate round out the largest markets for capital spending.

Demand for iron ore is recovering nicely, especially in China, where infrastructure stimulus is keeping steel mills busy. Steelmakers in China are in the midst of a massive relocation and replacement program, where complete steel mills are being built anew in coastal areas with new technology that improve emissions reduction and capacity at the same time. Chinese steelmakers are planning $153 billion worth of projects, accounting for about 45% of the value of the worlds steel projects.

Many countries are implementing programs to encourage domestic development of critical minerals such as rare earth metals. The Russian government recently announced plans to spend $1.5 billion to build out 11 projects for rare earth production. Industrial Info is tracking more than $13 billion rare earth mining and processing projects worldwide. There are currently 29 projects in the U.S. and Canada for rare earth mining and production.

Looking at the top 20 countries for mining project development in 2021, China leads the way, followed by Australia, India and Canada. In addition to Canada, the Americas are represented by Brazil, the U.S., Chile and Argentina. Surprisingly absent from the top 20 list this year is Peru and Mexico, both of which have been severely impacted by the pandemic and other social issues causing mining firms to delay some projects beyond 2021. Africa continues to be a continent of growing mining exploration and development activity by many countries, including China and India, looking to secure long-term resource supply. African countries including South Africa, Guinea, Mozambique, Congo, Ghana and Namibia will lead the continent in spending for 2021.

Lengthy permitting and regulatory processes continue to constrain new mine project development in the U.S. In recent years, increased attention has been given to reducing the regulatory load on critical minerals projects on federal lands; however, it is expected the government stance on this may change with the new administration.

The pandemic, along with economic, geopolitical and social issues, continue to constrain development in many countries in Latin America. In Brazil, Vale recently approved a $1.5 billion expansion of the Serre Sul mine, which aims at increasing iron ore capacity from 90 million tons per year (t/y) to 120 million t/y.

In Chile, Codelco has restarted copper projects and mines that were shuttered due to the pandemic. The company is in the middle of a $40 billion, 10-year upgrade and will resume work at El Teniente and Chuquicamata.

Companies like Glencore have announced coal production cutbacks in Australia. BHP Billiton recently announced plans to sell its coal assets. As a result, Industrial Info expects Australias coal miners to reduce capital expenditure reductions and delay projects until the market improves. Still, Bravus is moving ahead with the Carmichael coal megaproject in Queensland and other major coal projects continue.

In contrast, Australias iron ore miners are continuing to expand to meet growing demand from Asia (China). Major Australian iron ore miners BHP, Rio Tinto and Fortescue are benefiting from surging iron ore prices and supply holdups in Brazil. China currently imports almost 70% of its iron ore from Australia.

In conclusion, there are good reasons for miners and those who invest in mining to be optimistic going into 2021 as most leading indicators point to a rebound, and long-term drivers for capital spending remain intact. Mining companies continue to reinvent themselves and reinvest in mining assets to keep up with the worlds changing commodity appetite, as well as decarbonization and sustainability targets. This will drive innovation in new processing technologies, automation and emissions reduction.

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10 biggest mining companies

10 biggest mining companies

The mining industry is comprised of companies that explore and mine for precious and nonprecious metals and minerals, as well as energy commodities like coal and petroleum. They are used in the manufacturing of a broad range of industrial products, capital goods, and consumer items including machines, computers, clothing, buildings, and automobiles. Some companies in the mining sector even produce agricultural commodities. Mining is a global industry, but five of the largest companies are headquartered in China, the world's second-largest economy. Other big mining names are based in the U.K., Switzerland, Australia, and Brazil.

Below we look at the 10 biggest mining companies by 12-month trailing(TTM)revenue. Some companies outside the U.S. report profits semi-annually instead of quarterly, so the 12-month trailing data may be older than it is for companies that report quarterly. Data is courtesy of YCharts.com, unless otherwise noted. All figures are as of September 11.

This list is limited to companies that are publicly traded in the U.S. or Canada, either directly or throughADRs. However, we note that two of these companies trade at such low volumes that they should be avoided even though they have publicly listed ADRs: Jiangxi Copper Co. Ltd. (600362) and Yanzhou Coal Mining Co. Ltd. (600188). Due to their size and importance they have been included on the list, but with the ticker symbol associated with their respective listings on the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE).

Some of the stocks below are only tradedover-the-counter (OTC)in the U.S., not on exchanges. Trading OTC stocks often carries higher trading costs than trading stocks on exchanges. This can lower or even outweigh potential returns.

Glencore is a Switzerland-based multinational commodity trading and mining company. It produces metal, mineral, energy, and agricultural commodities. The company serves the automotive, steel, power generation, battery manufacturing, and oil sectors globally.

BHP is an Australia-based international resources company. It explores and mines minerals, including coal, iron ore, gold, titanium, ferroalloys, nickel, and copper properties. It also offers petroleum exploration, production, and refining services. The company serves customers worldwide.

Rio Tinto is a U.K.-based multinational metals and mining company. It explores and mines for aluminum, borax, coal, copper, gold, iron ore, lead, silver, tin, uranium, zinc, titanium dioxide feedstock, diamonds, talc, and zircon. The company serves customers in various industries worldwide.

Jiangxi Copper is a China-based copper mining company. It engages in the extraction and processing of precious and scattered metal, as well as sulphuric chemistry. The company's products include copper cathode, gold, silver, sulphuric acid, copper rod, copper tube, and copper foil.

Vale is a Brazil-based multinational mining company. It produces iron ore, pellets, manganese, iron alloys, gold, nickel, copper, bauxite, alumina, aluminum, potash, and coal. The company also owns and operates railroads and maritime terminals. The company operates in approximately 30 different countries.

China Shenhua is a China-based producer of coal and electricity. The company operates coal mines, produces various coal products, and generates power and electricity. It also operates transportation railways for coal and non-coal commodities, and provides logistics and vessels for coal and non-coal cargo.

Yanzhou is a China-based coal mining company and produces a broad range of products ranging from fine coal to power coal. The company also manufactures coal mining and excavating equipment, and operates power generation, railway transport, and heating businesses.

Anglo American is a U.K.-based mining company. It engages in the exploration and mining of precious metals, base metals, and ferrous metals. The company produces iron ore, manganese, metallurgical coal, copper, nickel, platinum, and diamonds. It has operations throughout the world.

Aluminum Corporation of China is a China-based manufacturer of aluminum products. The company produces aluminum ores, aluminum, bauxite, coal, and other products. It also operates an energy segment that engages in power generation, including conventional coal-fire power generation and renewable energy generation such as wind power and photovoltaic power.

Zijin Mining is a China-based multinational mining company. It engages in the exploration, mining, and smelting processing of gold, copper, zinc, and other metal mineral resources. The company also conducts metal trading and investment businesses globally.

tracking the 2021 mining industry trends | deloitte insights

tracking the 2021 mining industry trends | deloitte insights

2020 took the world by surprise, forcing leaders across the mining sector to reset their strategic objectives and priorities. In the 13th edition of Tracking the trends, a central narrative emerged - the issue of trust. This year we share our perspective on what mining companies should consider to increase or rebuild trust among their ecosystem of stakeholders, from their investors and employees to the communities and societies where they operate.DownloadTracking the trends,create acustomPDForwatch the video.

2021. See Terms of Use for more information. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee ("DTTL"), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as "Deloitte Global") does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to one or more of the US member firms of DTTL, their related entities that operate using the "Deloitte" name in the United States and their respective affiliates. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee ("DTTL"), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as "Deloitte Global") does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to one or more of the US member firms of DTTL, their related entities that operate using the "Deloitte" name in the United States and their respective affiliates. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.

deloitte global mining report explores key trends in 2020 | deloitte | pr

deloitte global mining report explores key trends in 2020 | deloitte | pr

As the industry balances growth strategies with preparation for a possible economic downturn, companies are revisiting talent and diversity, strengthening community relationships, and seeking new ways to create value. Navigating this complex landscape will require strong leadership, with mining executives expected to have broader skill sets as well as be fluent in everything from technology to environmental impacts.

NEW YORK, NY, USA, 3 February 2020Released today, the 12th annual edition of Deloitte Globals mining report, Tracking the Trends, explores key trends facing mining companies in their ongoing pursuit of productivity, financial discipline, operational excellence, and sustainable growth.

Mining has made impressive progress in the past few years, with many firms streamlining their portfolios and establishing more robust balance sheets in order to put themselves in a position of strength regardless of what lies ahead, says Andrew Swart, Deloitte Global Mining & Metals leader. At the same time, they are addressing climate change, developing new opportunities, strengthening community relationships, and investigating new ways to create value. All of this is in the service of pursuing sustainable growth and is reflected in the key industry trends identified for the new edition of our report.

The mining industry continues to face multiple complex challenges, from uncertainty across the geopolitical landscape to the disruptions of digital technology. There is also the increasingand increasingly divergentdemands from investors, ecosystem partners, workers, and impacted communities.

The companies that succeed will be the ones who lay a proper foundation today by establishing clear strategic goals and aligning operations to achieve those goals through financial discipline and the mitigation of risk.

Navigating these complex issues will require strong, forward-thinking leadership, says Swart. To lead from the front, mining executives will need to go beyond just good managerial skills, to creating differentiated strategies, creating flexibility in their operating models, and inspiring their teams to accept change and commit to a path.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

Deloitte is a leading global provider of audit and assurance, consulting, financial advisory, risk advisory, tax and related services. Our global network of member firms and related entities in more than 150 countries and territories (collectively, the Deloitte organization) serves four out of five Fortune Global 500 companies. Learn how Deloittes approximately 312,000 people make an impact that matters at www.deloitte.com.

Andrew is both the Global, and Canadian Leader of the Mining & Metals practice as well as the Global Leader for the sector. In his Global roles, Andrew leads a team from around the world and has the r... More

2021. For information, contact Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

gem - global energy and mining industry database | bci gem

gem - global energy and mining industry database | bci gem

For global insight on future mining industry, oil & gas and renewable energy projects, trust GEM. Tracking projects in Australia, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine and the United States.

GEM covers every stage of the oil & gas extraction and drilling process from Exploration and Scoping, to Pre-Feasibility and Definitive Feasibility studies through to the operations and maintenance stage.

We have a highly trained research staff that gathers the information from thousands of resources direct from project sponsors (GCs, architects, developers, owners), city/state agency filings, business/local publications, and primary research.

deloitte global mining and metals report explores key trends shaping the industrys future | deloitte global | press release

deloitte global mining and metals report explores key trends shaping the industrys future | deloitte global | press release

The mining industry is at a critical juncture as a key player in the energy transition, but needs capital, talent and the support of communities and host governments. Mining leaders need to position their organizations and industry for success while focusing on addressing the trust deficit that exists with many key stakeholders. Looking beyond the impact of COVID-19 the report addresses longer-term trends in the industry and what new trends might be emerging.

NEW YORK, NY, USA, 1 February 2021Released today, the 13th annual edition of Deloitte Globals mining and metals report, Tracking the Trends 2021, explores key trends facing mining and metals companies as they navigate the impacts of the pandemic and the need to rebuild trust among stakeholders in their pursuit of renewed productivity, financial discipline, operational excellence, and future growth. The report takes a look at what the mining sector is doing right and what needs to improve, as well as offering best-practice examples. "This is a critical moment for mining," says Andrew Swart, Deloitte Global Mining & Metals sector leader. "The industry is charting a path out of a pandemic where the impacts varied greatly depending on what commodity is mined, and where the company is located, therefore resiliency is one of the most important tools. At the same time miners need to rebuild trust among stakeholders, including investors, the workforce, and the local communities, as success in the future will be based on factors beyond just financial performance." Overcoming the trust deficit The World Economic Forum released a report in July 2020 that identified a trust deficit as being the most important risk facing the mining industry. Addressing this challenge is causing mining leaders to redefine their strategic objectives, reconnect and recommit to their stakeholders, and reset their priorities. This year, we share our perspective on what mining companies need to do to rebuild trust among their extended ecosystem of stakeholders, from their investors and employees to the communities and societies where they operate. As miners navigate the new normal, resiliency is imperative, so its not surprising that we kick off this years trends with four divergent scenarios of how the world might play out over the next three to five years. COVID-19 has accelerated many trends, but the world remains uncertain and these scenarios will be key as firms navigate different stakeholder needs to close the trust deficit. From an investor perspective, this means winning back confidence by finding new ways to deliver consistent shareholder returns, particularly as transactional activity picks up, and closing the supply chain gaps that the pandemic brought to the fore. Many miners are also taking this opportunity to recalibrate for the future by shifting towards integrated operations to drive more predictable returns. To rebuild trust across their talent network, companies are redefining leadership, adapting the workplace culture, and recommitting to the goal of zero harm. They are also revisiting their commitments to local communities, and to society at large, by enhancing their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance. This has seen them working to get serious about decarbonization and turn their corporate governance frameworks into a competitive advantageinitiatives that will drive value for their broader stakeholder groups as well. Mining companies are also working to link their social investments to sustainable outcomes and playing an active role in the worlds transition to a clean energy future. Top industry trends Deloitte Global has identified ten trends as defining the present and near future of the mining industry. Each of these trends has a role to play in guiding companies to success beyond the pandemic, and in re-establishing trust with stakeholders. Building resilience amid volatility. COVID-19 has had a range of impacts on mining companies, depending on commodity and geography. To help understand this fluid situation, Deloitte Global highlights four divergent scenarios of how the industry can play out over the next 3-5 years. The pandemic has impacted some megatrends in the market and how these unfold may be quite different in each of the four scenarios. Planning for a range of outcomes is key as leaders build resilience in their organizations, adds Swart. To do this, leaders should reconsider the assumptions of their current strategy, determine how they will respond if an unexpected scenario occurs, and pay attention to local, regional, and global indicators about where things are heading. M&A in an altered world. M&A activity is increasing as mining companies seek to strengthen their portfolios and develop commodities. Companies lost investor trust during the peak of the last cycle, when numerous M&A transactions lost value rather than created it. To build investor confidence mining companies need to address some key table stake issues while at the same time look at the strategic opportunity around M&A as the industry undergoes some structural changes. Getting serious about decarbonization. Mining companies are under strong pressure from investors, regulators, and local communities to move beyond environmental risk identification and mitigation and instead execute on fully developed decarbonization agendas. Companies are making net-zero commitments in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement and starting to shift to execution. Linking social investments to sustainable outcomes. As mining companies are called upon to play a greater role in remote regions, an opportunity exists to build trust with communities by creating value beyond compliance, collaborating more effectively with host governments and linking activities and long-term investments to sustainable outcomes. Corporate governance adding to competitive advantage. Companies have often relegated governance to a backstage role, opening the door to potential missteps followed by reputation damage and loss of market value. Miners are strengthening governance processes, especially around issues such as human rights, ethical conduct, cybersecurity, and social impacts. Creating an agile supply chain. The pandemic put the supply chain in the foreground of concerns. Companies need to mitigate supply chain risks by illuminating the multiple tiers in their supply chain and reconsidering their inventory strategies. Geopolitics, the rise of nationalism, and cross-border supply challenges will also reshape global supply chains. The path towards integrated operations. Mining companies can better respond to external events and internal variables by breaking down silos and driving towards integrated operations by empowering their people to make the best decisions for the company as a whole. This will help combat the inherent inefficiency embedded in organizations, but requires firms to leverage technology, redesign processes, rethink workplace design and shift culture Advancing the future of work. The events of the past year have prompted many companies to review labor routines, institute more remote and virtual work, and to experiment with outsourcing key roles. Some are already taking the next steps, which include redefining the role of and expectations for leadership, and enabling the creation of a new workplace culture. These are central to building trust in a talent starved sector. On the road to zero harm. While safety has long been a focus in the mining industry, there is a key opportunity for the industry to more actively collaborate around data pooling, addressing the interoperability of wearables and harness the power of predictive analytics. Meeting demand for critical minerals. As the world converts to renewable energy sources and adopts electric vehicles, demand for some commodities will rise. Candidates include copper, nickel, lithium, and cobalt, but no one is certain which ones will eventually see the most demand, and there is a scramble to lock in supply. About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more. Deloitte is a leading global provider of audit and assurance, consulting, financial advisory, risk advisory, tax and related services. Our global network of member firms and related entities in more than 150 countries and territories (collectively, the Deloitte organization) serves four out of five Fortune Global 500 companies. Learn how Deloittes more than 330,000 people make an impact that matters at www.deloitte.com.

NEW YORK, NY, USA, 1 February 2021Released today, the 13th annual edition of Deloitte Globals mining and metals report, Tracking the Trends 2021, explores key trends facing mining and metals companies as they navigate the impacts of the pandemic and the need to rebuild trust among stakeholders in their pursuit of renewed productivity, financial discipline, operational excellence, and future growth. The report takes a look at what the mining sector is doing right and what needs to improve, as well as offering best-practice examples.

"This is a critical moment for mining," says Andrew Swart, Deloitte Global Mining & Metals sector leader. "The industry is charting a path out of a pandemic where the impacts varied greatly depending on what commodity is mined, and where the company is located, therefore resiliency is one of the most important tools. At the same time miners need to rebuild trust among stakeholders, including investors, the workforce, and the local communities, as success in the future will be based on factors beyond just financial performance."

The World Economic Forum released a report in July 2020 that identified a trust deficit as being the most important risk facing the mining industry. Addressing this challenge is causing mining leaders to redefine their strategic objectives, reconnect and recommit to their stakeholders, and reset their priorities.

This year, we share our perspective on what mining companies need to do to rebuild trust among their extended ecosystem of stakeholders, from their investors and employees to the communities and societies where they operate.

As miners navigate the new normal, resiliency is imperative, so its not surprising that we kick off this years trends with four divergent scenarios of how the world might play out over the next three to five years. COVID-19 has accelerated many trends, but the world remains uncertain and these scenarios will be key as firms navigate different stakeholder needs to close the trust deficit.

From an investor perspective, this means winning back confidence by finding new ways to deliver consistent shareholder returns, particularly as transactional activity picks up, and closing the supply chain gaps that the pandemic brought to the fore. Many miners are also taking this opportunity to recalibrate for the future by shifting towards integrated operations to drive more predictable returns.

They are also revisiting their commitments to local communities, and to society at large, by enhancing their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance. This has seen them working to get serious about decarbonization and turn their corporate governance frameworks into a competitive advantageinitiatives that will drive value for their broader stakeholder groups as well. Mining companies are also working to link their social investments to sustainable outcomes and playing an active role in the worlds transition to a clean energy future.

Deloitte Global has identified ten trends as defining the present and near future of the mining industry. Each of these trends has a role to play in guiding companies to success beyond the pandemic, and in re-establishing trust with stakeholders.

Planning for a range of outcomes is key as leaders build resilience in their organizations, adds Swart. To do this, leaders should reconsider the assumptions of their current strategy, determine how they will respond if an unexpected scenario occurs, and pay attention to local, regional, and global indicators about where things are heading.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

Deloitte is a leading global provider of audit and assurance, consulting, financial advisory, risk advisory, tax and related services. Our global network of member firms and related entities in more than 150 countries and territories (collectively, the Deloitte organization) serves four out of five Fortune Global 500 companies. Learn how Deloittes more than 330,000 people make an impact that matters at www.deloitte.com.

2021. For information, contact Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL), its global network of member firms, and their related entities (collectively, the Deloitte organization). DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) and each of its member firms and related entities are legally separate and independent entities, which cannot obligate or bind each other in respect of third parties. DTTL and each DTTL member firm and related entity is liable only for its own acts and omissions, and not those of each other. DTTL does not provide services to clients. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more.

mining suppliers in top mining countries worldwide | statista

mining suppliers in top mining countries worldwide | statista

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