old mining in saudi arabia

mining jobs in saudi arabia (july 2021)

mining jobs in saudi arabia (july 2021)

Job Description: You are, in a word, efficient the kind of individual who can be counted on to be resourceful and work in a well-organized in data storage structures, data mining, and data cleansing....

Job Brief: Looking for a Data Analyst that will turn data into information, information into insight, and insight into business decisions. models, database design development, data mining, and segmentation techniquesStrong knowledge ...

Requisition ID: 235719 Requisition Posting End Date: 07/15/2021 Company Overview: Since 1898, we have helped customers complete , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals markets. Our services ... , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals. Our company and ...

Requisition ID: 235370 Requisition Posting End Date: 07/24/2021 Company Overview: Since 1898, we have helped customers complete , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals markets. Our services ...

Requisition ID: 235369 Requisition Posting End Date: 07/24/2021 Company Overview: Since 1898, we have helped customers complete , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals markets. Our services ...

Job Description Lead Estimator Reports to: Project Controls Manager Location: Jazan, KSA POSITION SUMMARY Define and Detail Cost Estimates & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide.With ...

Job Description we are seekingConstruction Manager for Jizan location To direct, control the construction execution of projects, & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide.With ...

Requisition ID: 235684 Requisition Posting End Date: 07/15/2021 Company Overview: Since 1898, we have helped customers complete , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals markets. Our services ...

Requisition ID: 235446 Requisition Posting End Date: 07/14/2021 COMPANY OVERVIEW Since 1898, we have helped customers complete more , Security & Environmental; Energy; and Mining & Metals markets. Our services ...

Manages the relationship with existing customers and also acquire new business in order to achieve KPIs and profitability targets. customer satisfaction and ensure company mines more business and more revenues ...

Manage and control the stock replenishment activities by proper forecasts. Ensure to Runs the MRPs and check results on regular relocate materials among the different mines accordingly). Provide buying department ...

Job Description Sr. Process Analyzers Technician Business Line - Downstream Industry/ Sector - Chemical Work Location - Saudi Arabia & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide ...

Job Description Environmental Engineer Business Line - Downstream Work Location - Saudi Arabia Perm / Direct role Minimum Requirements & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide ...

Job Description Reliability Engineer -Compressors Work Location - Saudi Arabia Business Line - Downstream / Chemical Position Summary: & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide ...

Job Description we are seekingProject Commercial Manager Strong experience in Business Systems is needed for the Environment Department & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide.With ...

Job Description we are seeking Enterprise Risk Management - Manager Qualification - Actively advise on the latest sectorial risk trends, & Renewables, Infrastructure, Life Sciences, Mining, Automotive and Chemicals sectors worldwide ...

Description At PwC, we measure success by our ability to create the value that our clients and our people are looking for. Our reputation government entities. The Energy, Utilities, Mining and Infrastructure (EUMI) team within ...

Description At PwC, we measure success by our ability to create the value that our clients and our people are looking for. Our reputation Telecommunication, Transportation, Energy, Power and Mining. Working knowledge and understanding of ...

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saudi arabia's new mining law - lexology

saudi arabia's new mining law - lexology

In recent years, Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial growth in the production of primary, midstream, and downstream mineral and metals products catering to both local and export markets. Currently, as a part of the Kingdom's Vision 2030 program, Saudi Arabia is working to increase the mining sector's contribution to the Saudi economy with the objective of making the mining sector the third pillar of Saudi industry, alongside the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law, which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law. In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments introduced by the New Law.

In early June 2020, Saudi Arabia issued a new Mining Law aimed at promoting mining in Saudi Arabia. The new Mining Law establishes a new fund to provide sustainable finance for the development of the mining sector as well as to support geo logical survey and exploration programs. The initial value and scope of the fund will be clarified when the laws implementing regulations are issued. However, we expect that the fund will provide financial support in the form of medium- and long-term soft loans to businesses operating in the mining sector. Other amendments introduced by the new Mining Law include: (i) an increase in the types of land on which mining activities may be undertaken; (ii) an effective extension of the duration of explo- ration licenses; (iii) the ability to mortgage mining licenses; and (iv) the creation of a mineral zones register. The new Mining Law is the first of many steps that can be expected to implement Saudi Vision 2030s goals for the Saudi mining industry.

In recent years, Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial growth in the production of primary, midstream, and downstream min- eral and metals products catering to both local and export markets. Currently, as a part of the Kingdoms Vision 2030 pro- gram, Saudi Arabia is working to increase the mining sectors contribution to the Saudi economy with the objective of mak- ing the mining sector the third pillar of Saudi industry, along- side the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law1 (New Law), which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law2 (Old Law). In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments intro- duced by the New Law.

As of September 10, 2020, the New Mining Law has not yet been published in the Saudi Arabian Official Gazette and will not come into force until 180 days after the date of publica- tion. The New Law provides that the Ministry of Industry and Mineral Resources (Ministry) will have the authority to issue the regulations, forms, procedures, and instructions necessary to implement the New Law.

The New Law provides for the creation of a new mining fund (Fund) to provide sustainable finance for the development of the mining sector as well as to support geological survey and exploration programs. The Fund is to be financed by fees for licenses and other services provided by the Ministry, fines imposed under the New Law, surface rents, financial returns from competitive bids, and gifts, donations, and endowments.

Until the publication of the New Laws implementing regulations and any additional regulations governing the Fund, the nature and mechanics of the Fund remain undefined. We can spec- ulate that the Fund will serve the Saudi mining sector much as the Saudi Industrial Development Fund serves Saudi industry: by providing financial support in the form of medium- and long-term soft loans to businesses operating in the targeted sectors.

However, reconnaissance4 licenses can now be issued in respect of all lands other than those listed above, and explo- ration5 and exploitation6 licenses can now be issued, with the necessary approvals and permits from the relevant govern- ment agencies,7 in respect of:

The provisions of the New Law governing reconnaissance licenses are substantially the same as the provisions of the Old Law. However, it is worth noting that the New Law provides expressly that under a reconnaissance license, access to pri- vate lands must be negotiated with the landowner.

Under the Old Law, an exploration license had a term of five years, with the option to renew the licenses term for a single additional five-year period. Moreover, the size of the licensed area was limited to 100 km2.

The New Law provides that exploration licenses for Class A9 and Class B10 minerals shall have a term of five years, which may be renewed for additional five-year periods provided that the exploration licenses total duration does not exceed 15 years. As with the Old Law, the New Law provides that the size of the licensed area for an exploration license for Class A and Class B minerals shall not exceed 100 km2. However, the New Law limits the term of an exploration license for Class C11min- erals to one year, which term cannot be renewed or extended, and the size of the licensed area for an exploration license for Class C minerals is limited to not more than five km2.12

The New Law also limits the duration of a mining license (inclu- sive of renewals and/or extensions) to 60 years total and limits the licensed area to not more than 50 km2. However, the New Law limits mining licenses to Class A and Class B minerals only. If the licensee wishes to exploit Class C minerals within the licensed area, he must apply to the Ministry and pay the prescribed additional financial fee.13

The Old Law provided expressly that a licensee could not mortgage the rights granted by the license or transfer to a third party the obligations imposed by the license without the prior written approval of the Ministry.

The New Law provides14 that (subject to Islamic law as enforced in Saudi Arabia and other applicable laws) a licensee may mortgage the rights granted by an exploration license or an exploitation license, but not those granted by a reconnais- sance license. The mortgage will be effective only after the licensee (i.e., the mortgagor) has registered the mortgage in the Ministrys license register. The mortgagee shall thereafter have the right to implement any mortgaged right under the license and to transfer any such rights, provided that:

Vision 2030 envisages structural reforms driven by the private sector to intensify exploration, the development of an exhaus- tive database of the Kingdoms natural resources, improved licensing for extraction, capital injections into infrastructure- related projects, and the creation of numerous funding mech- anisms to assist in the development of the sector.15 Saudi Arabias new Mining Law is the first of many steps that can be expected to implement Vision 2030s goals for the Saudi min- ing industry. The issuing of the implementing regulations of the New Law will be the next step.

Lexology/Newsstand articles are very good quality. I like the short summary style and how it is broken down by practice area. Lexology/Newsstand is a good indicator of whether a law firm has an attorney who is knowledgeable about a subject area.

saudi arabia's new mining law - energy and natural resources - saudi arabia

saudi arabia's new mining law - energy and natural resources - saudi arabia

In recent years, Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial growth in the production of primary, midstream, and downstream mineral and metals products catering to both local and export markets. Currently, as a part of the Kingdom's Vision 2030 program, Saudi Arabia is working to increase the mining sector's contribution to the Saudi economy with the objective of making the mining sector the third pillar of Saudi industry, alongside the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law, which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law. In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments introduced by the New Law.

In early June 2020, Saudi Arabia issued a new Mining Law aimed at promoting mining in Saudi Arabia. The new Mining Law establishes a new fund to provide sustainable finance for the development of the mining sector as well as to support geological survey and exploration programs. The initial value and scope of the fund will be clarified when the law's implementing regulations are issued. However, we expect that the fund will provide financial support in the form of medium- and long-term soft loans to businesses operating in the mining sector. Other amendments introduced by the new Mining Law include: (i) an increase in the types of land on which mining activities may be undertaken; (ii) an effective extension of the duration of exploration licenses; (iii) the ability to mortgage mining licenses; and (iv) the creation of a mineral zones register. The new Mining Law is the first of many steps that can be expected to implement Saudi Vision 2030's goals for the Saudi mining industry.

In recent years, Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial growth in the production of primary, midstream, and downstream mineral and metals products catering to both local and export markets. Currently, as a part of the Kingdom's Vision 2030 program, Saudi Arabia is working to increase the mining sector's contribution to the Saudi economy with the objective of making the mining sector the third pillar of Saudi industry, alongside the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law1 ("New Law"), which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law2 ("Old Law"). In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments introduced by the New Law.

As of September 10, 2020, the New Mining Law has not yet been published in the Saudi Arabian Official Gazette and will not come into force until 180 days after the date of publication. The New Law provides that the Ministry of Industry and Mineral Resources ("Ministry") will have the authority to issue the regulations, forms, procedures, and instructions necessary to implement the New Law.

The New Law provides for the creation of a new mining fund ("Fund") to provide sustainable finance for the development of the mining sector as well as to support geological survey and exploration programs. The Fund is to be financed by fees for licenses and other services provided by the Ministry, fines imposed under the New Law, surface rents, financial returns from competitive bids, and gifts, donations, and endowments.

Until the publication of the New Law's implementing regulations and any additional regulations governing the Fund, the nature and mechanics of the Fund remain undefined. We can speculate that the Fund will serve the Saudi mining sector much as the Saudi Industrial Development Fund serves Saudi industry: by providing financial support in the form of medium- and long-term soft loans to businesses operating in the targeted sectors.

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saudi arabia identifies 54 mineral-mining sites | arab news

saudi arabia identifies 54 mineral-mining sites | arab news

RIYADH: The Saudi minister of industry and mineral resources, Bandar Al-Khorayef, has issued seven decisions relating to the largest allocation process for mining-reserve sites in the Kingdom. They include 54 sites covering an area of approximately 4,000 square kilometers. The decisions are part of the leaderships goal to develop the mining sector.

The identification of the mining sites comes as the ministry aims to offer an attractive environment for local and international businesses to invest in the sector, and provide the data needed to attract the interest of the private sector. The Saudi Geological Survey plans to carry out a thorough study of the mining reserves, the results of which will be used to promote investment opportunities.

Abdulrahman Al-Rashed, a member of the Shoura Councils finance committee, said the Kingdom is rich in natural resources, especially minerals, and the decisions will open up the mining sector to investors. Other mineral sources in the country have not yet been opened up for investment, he noted, and added that mining companies around the world recognize the importance of these opportunities.

He also commended the transparency of the decisions, which delineate clearly the responsibilities of the authorities and local or foreign investors. The Ministry of Industry and Mineral Resources drafted the laws regulating the mining industry after studying international experiences in the sector, said Al-Rashed, a former chairman the Council of Saudi Chambers. They are in line with global mining laws and offer investors many concessions, he noted. In addition, he said it is highly likely the authorities will offer incentives to attract investors, just as they were offered to petrochemicals and gas investors in the 1970s.

Economic adviser Abdullah Al-Barrak said the infrastructure needed to attract investment in the mining sector has been improved in recent years and the prices of precious minerals have been rising of late, making investment more attractive than ever.

This is the right time to open up the mining sector for investment, he said. In fact, the government started thinking seriously about this sector about eight years ago but decided to go ahead now because the opportunities are more favorable for local and foreign investors, besides which the mining infrastructure is robust and ready for vital investment.

Fadhel Saad Albuainain, an economic analyst, said Saudi Vision 2030 targets the development of a number of vital sectors, including mining, to diversify the Kingdoms economy, create new industries and increase GDP. The Saudi mining sector is potentially huge but requires massive investment and input from experts with considerable experience in the field.

Privatization is instrumental to the mining sector, he said. Still, special attention should be given to the nature of contracts and the governments return on these investments. The future production variables and profit maximization should be taken into consideration so as to allow the government to have a share of the future returns.

The privatization of the mining sites should be carried out based on a fair assessment of the reserves that meets the needs and interests of both the investor and the government, Albuainain said. However, a degree of hedging in allocation contracts is important to allow for variations in capacity and prices, he added.

RIYADH: The Kingdoms Fashion Commission on Wednesday announced the finalists chosen to participate in its year-long Saudi 100 Brands program. The initiative will include training, advice and mentorship from experts in the fashion sector. The successful applicants were revealed during a ceremony at the Marriott Hotel in Riyadhs Diplomatic Quarter. They were chosen after two weeks of interviews carried out by experts in the capital and Jeddah, and online. Based on these, the initial list of 1,348 candidates was whittled down to a shortlist of 400.

The first consulting and training initiative of its kind, the program has highlighted the diversity of talent among fashion designers in the Kingdom. The chosen participants range from Saudi designers who have already launched successful brands inside and outside the Kingdom, to young designers and start-ups. Among them is a Saudi woman from the city of Khobar who has more than three decades of experience in designing and sewing bridal gowns. Another is a woman from the third generation of a family-owned jewelry company in Riyadh. A Saudi brand with a presence in London and Dubai was also chosen.

The program will begin next week with a consultative program presented by specialists in the fashion sector who have practical experience of prestigious international brands such as Chanel, Valentino, Bvlgari, Kering and LVMH. They will provide group and individual training courses and advisory sessions covering topics such as business development and design. The program also includes international partnerships with Vogue Arabia and regional retailers. Princess Noura bint Faisal, the Fashion Commissions sector development director, said that the enthusiasm of the candidates was evident during the interviews, as was their eagerness to share the stories of their careers, including successes and frustrations.

In general, we sensed the passion of Saudi designers as they spoke of their experience while working to establish their own brands, she said. They also spoke the challenges they faced, she added, especially the fear of failing to achieve their dreams. The Fashion Commission understands all these challenges and concerns, said Princess Noura. Speaking directly with the creative community helps us understand their concerns, and leads us to plan more initiatives that help them overcome their fears. Burak Cakmak, the Fashion Commissions CEO, said the program recognizes that the finalists are at differing stages of their careers, and so the individual programs developed for each of them will vary depending on specific needs.

The first step will therefore be to gather as much information from them as possible, he explained. Then control of the program will be placed in their own hands by having them set objectives for themselves in the areas they feel will benefit them the most, given that a key aim is to help them develop their businesses and build their brands by improving their technical skills, and create international opportunities. The 100 Brands program, which was launched by the commission on June 3, also covers concepts such as innovation, the technical aspects of fashion, sales and marketing strategies, and leadership skills. The aim is to nurture and support the development of 100 Saudi brands capable of competing regionally and internationally. It is part of the commissions efforts to develop the fashion sector in the Kingdom, within the framework of the national strategy for culture that forms part of Saudi Vision 2030.

RIYADH: The Saudi Fund for Development has launched a pioneering $9.2 million project to develop a renewable-energy electricity grid in the Azraq camp for Syrian refugees in Jordan, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Wednesday. The funding is in the form of a grant from the Kingdom, in cooperation and coordination with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), said Sultan Al-Murshed, the funds CEO. The project, the first of its kind in the world in the field of renewable energy, aims to provide free, clean power to more than 54,000 refugees, delivering electricity to more than 10,000 shelters by connecting all camp facilities to the grid. We have a long relationship with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees that extends back more than 10 years, during which we were able to jointly provide support to a large number of refugees around the world, Al-Murshed said. Through the fund, Saudi Arabia has contributed $300 million to support Syrian refugees and host governments, and has implemented 17 projects, worth $78 million, in cooperation with the High Commissioner.

#SaudiFundforDevelopment CEO @Saalmarshad launched an Electrical Network Project at Azraq camp - Jordan in cooperation with @Refugees. This project will provide clean energy for more than 54,000 Syrian refugees. #KSA #ProsperTogether#SDG7 pic.twitter.com/c9Fy4wfnAx

He added that the funds support for residents of the Azraq camp is not limited to the energy project, but also includes $3 million in financial assistance to provide health care that will benefit more than 37,000 refugees. Mamoun Mohsen, UNHCRs senior regional external relations officer, thanked the Kingdom and the fund for the support. He praised the funds role in developing this important project that will provide electricity to tens of thousands of Syrian refugees who live in harsh environments in the camp, where the development of the electricity grid has improved their daily lives. The Saudi ambassador to Jordan, Naif bin Bandar Al-Sudairi, said: This specific project to develop the Azraq refugee camps network reflects the great efforts made by the Saudi government, led by King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, in supporting Syrian refugees and the communities hosting them, through the strategy of the work of the fund, which is one of the largest and most important active entities in providing sustainable development assistance and achieving stability and prosperity for many developing countries by providing social and economic support. The Saudi Fund for Development has a long history of support for humanitarian issues, as a major partner of the UNs international humanitarian relief efforts. Through the fund, the Kingdom has contributed about $1 billion to support 14 international organizations working under the umbrella of the UN. Senior Jordanian officials and UNHCR representatives attended the inauguration ceremony for the project at the Azraq camp.

JEDDAH:The General Entertainment Authority (GEA) signed a memorandum of understanding with the Social Development Bank (SDB), to provide soft financing amounting to a total of SR500 million ($133 million).

According to the MoU signed at the GEAs headquarters in Riyadh by its CEO Faisal Bafarat and SDB CEO Ibrahim bin Hamad Al-Rashed the two parties will cooperate through financial support for entertainment activities, harmonization with applicable laws and regulations, and establishing credit mechanisms, agreements and performance standards.

According to the MoU, the two parties cooperate through financial support for entertainment activities, harmonization with applicable laws and regulations, and establishing credit mechanisms, agreements and performance standards.

The GEA aims to activate the soft financing product by supporting at least 50 projects throughout the period of the MoU. The GEA qualifies quality entertainment projects and conforms them with the conditions and standards approved by both parties.

The SDB will also support and finance projects through the Ofoq program, which provides financing for small enterprises amounting to SR10 million. This latest financing project comes as part of a series of agreements with the GEA that embody the role of the bank as a source of economic empowerment with a developmental impact.

The SDB will aim to create and qualify projects for Saudi youth in the entertainment sector, in addition to providing specialized capacity-building programs for entrepreneurs in the sector and providing advice for emerging enterprises.

RIYADH: The Saudi Heritage Authority has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Elm, a leading digital-solutions company, to cooperate in a number of ways. In particular, it relates to the protection of cultural heritage sites in the Kingdom through the use of digital systems and technical programs, along with the smart operation of the sites and enhancement of the visitor experience.

It includes plans for consultative research to determine the current status of the protection of antiquities and urban heritage at archaeological and heritage sites in the Kingdom, along with levels of awareness in communities of the importance of preserving the nations heritage. In addition, there will be a study of the global methods of managing and operating cultural heritage sites in ways that enhance the experience for visitors by ensuring that they receive the best possible services.

The memorandum is in line with the aims of the Heritage Authority to protect, manage and sustainably develop cultural heritage sites and resources in Saudi Arabia, and to encourage the development and production of cultural heritage content through partnerships with government and private-sector organizations.

The objective of such cooperation is to harness capabilities to best serve the Kingdoms national heritage, enhance the experiences of those interested in exploring it, and promote the nations historical and civilizational heritage locally and internationally.

During a meeting with Asir Gov. Prince Turki bin Talal bin Abdul Aziz, Patrick Simonnet, who is also EU ambassador to Bahrain and Oman, highlighted the provinces tourism and environment sectors as key areas to concentrate on.

The diplomat, who was visiting the Asir region, told Arab News: We had a fruitful first meeting with the governor and discussions focused on relations between the EU and the Kingdom as well as the Asir Vision which is spearheaded by the governor for his province.

I conveyed the EU interest in building stronger economic links with the province through trade and investment, notably in the sectors targeted by the vision and in particular in tourism and environment, he said.

Simonnet recently pointed out that the EU and the Kingdom shared the same forward-looking spirit, creating a dynamic partnership. He drew parallels between the European Green Deal (the EUs sustainability initiative launched in December 2019) and the key development goals of the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan.

Its a critical subject. I think you will hear that from all Europeans, but we truly find it a remarkable agenda, which also speaks very much to some of the aspects of the European Green Deal, which is the equivalent of Vision 2030 for Europe.

mining & metals | deloitte saudi arabia | energy and res

mining & metals | deloitte saudi arabia | energy and res

Deloittes Mining & Metals team offers unrivaled depth, breadth and quality of expertise. With an established international network of professionals, we offer a global, integrated approach combined with business and industry knowledge to help our clients excel anywhere in the world.

2021. See Terms of Use for more information. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (DTTL), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) does not provide services to clients.Please seeAbout Deloitteto learn more about our global network of member firms.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (DTTL), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as Deloitte Global) does not provide services to clients.Please seeAbout Deloitteto learn more about our global network of member firms.

maaden job vacancies | saudi arabian mining company careers 2021

maaden job vacancies | saudi arabian mining company careers 2021

Are you looking Maaden Job Vacancies in Saudi Arabia?. Here we are sharing the latest Maaden Careers & Jobs for you Maaden is among the fastest-growing mining companies in the world and the largest multi-commodity mining and metals company in the Middle East. Maaden pioneered the mining industry in Saudi Arabia, building a world-class, unique and fully integrated mining value chain. Maaden Job Vacancy

Maaden looking for talented candidates to fill their various vacancies in Saudi Arabia. Maaden is becoming a key player in the long-term diversification of Saudi Arabia economy. Maaden complies with the highest international standards of corporate governance and continues to build the company operations on a strong foundation of sustainable practices.

Company/Organization: Maaden (Saudi Arabian Mining Company) Job Location: Saudi Arabia Nationality: Any Qualification: Bachelor Degree/Diploma/High School Salary: Not Disclosed Experience: Minimum 3 to 5 Years

saudi arabia's new mining law | jones day - jdsupra

saudi arabia's new mining law | jones day - jdsupra

In recent years, Saudi Arabia has witnessed substantial growth in the production of primary, midstream, and downstream mineral and metals products catering to both local and export markets. Currently, as a part of the Kingdom's Vision 2030 program, Saudi Arabia is working to increase the mining sector's contribution to the Saudi economy with the objective of making the mining sector the third pillar of Saudi industry, alongside the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law, which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law. In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments introduced by the New Law.

To assist in achieving this goal, Saudi Arabia announced on June 9, 2020, the issuance of a new Mining Law, which offers certain changes and incentives not found in the previous Mining Law. In this White Paper, we will examine some of the more substantial amendments introduced by the New Law.

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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saudi arabia: new mining investment law in saudi arabia

saudi arabia: new mining investment law in saudi arabia

As part of Saudi Vision 2030, a strategic framework aimed at reducing Saudi Arabias dependence on oil and diversifying its economy, the Ministry of Industry and Mineral Resources developed the New Mining Investment Law (theNew Law). One of the main goals of the New Law is to attract more local and international investors to the mining sector, and it lays the foundation for a number of interesting initiatives, including (i) the establishment of a national geological database, (ii) the establishment of a Mining Fund to support the mining sector, (iii) potentially streamlining the procedure for obtaining mining licenses, and (iv) introducing certain financial incentives for investors. In this article, we discuss the New Law, the notable differences between the New Law and the previous Mining Investment Law, and the potential opportunities for investors presented by the New Law and the wider sector reforms already underway.

Licenses and Licensing procedure Detailed procedures for the issuing of licenses will be included in the regulations; it is expected there will be aggressive new timelines for the Ministry and other stakeholders to adhere to when processing and approving applications. Crucially, the New Law continues to grant the holder of an Exploration License the exclusive right to obtain a Utilization/Exploitation License for the relevant License Site.

Financial provisions Holders of Exploitation/Utilization Licenses for Class A Minerals will be exempt from paying either (i) the financial consideration or (ii) a percentage of their net revenues, for the first five years after a license is issued, which will provide valuable relief during the early stages of a project when capital costs and risks are at their highest. The New Law also continues to provide for customs duties exemptions for imported equipment and spare parts required for carrying out any licensed Mining Activity.

Financing & mortgaging Under the New Law, licensees are permitted to mortgage/ pledge their rights under both Exploitation/Utilization Licenses and Exploration Licenses without obtaining the prior written approval of the Ministry, and the New Law specifically provides for mortgagees/pledgees to transfer licenses to eligible persons.

Andrew is a partner and Head of Baker McKenzie Habib Al Mulla's Arbitration and Construction practice. He has been based in Dubai since 2009. He is a solicitor advocate and arbitration law specialist. He works extensively across the Middle East, Africa and Asia, acting for governments and international corporations on complex commercial disputes under a variety of civil and common law systems. He is ranked in Chambers Global, Legal 500 and is listed in Whos Who Legal as one of the worlds leading construction lawyers. Andrew has a commercial focus and is particularly adept at partnering with his clients and understanding their business. Clients state that he impresses with his command of potential issues and he has "relentless tenacity and absolute client focus" (Chambers Global). Who's Who Legal says: "Rising star" Andrew Mackenzie has "an exceptional knowledge" and "a strong commitment to his clients."

Mike Webster is a Partner in Baker McKenzies Global Energy, Mining and Infrastructure Industry Group and heads the Corporate Department of the London office. Mike has more than 30 years experience working on transactions across the EMEA region, as well as in Asia and the Caribbean. Mike has worked in the Firm's London and Hong Kong offices.

Greg McNab is a member of the Firm's Corporate & Securities Practice Group in Toronto. His main areas of practice include financings of public and private securities issuers, investment management products, capital markets transactions, mergers and acquisitions and resources and energy matters, both domestically and internationally. He also advises on corporate governance, regulatory compliance, continuous disclosure and stock exchange matters for public issuers. Mr. McNab helps lead the Firm's Global and Canadian Mining Groups. Mr. McNab regularly speaks, writes published articles and appears in the media with respect to a variety of securities, mining and energy matters. He is a director and Canadian Chair of the Canadian Australian Chamber of Commerce. A former mechanical engineer, Mr. McNab is also the co-chair of the International Emissions Trading Association's global carbon capture and storage working group.

Derek is a partner in Baker McKenzie's Corporate Markets practice group in Brisbane. Derek practices in corporate law with a focus on capital markets, including mergers and acquisitions and capital raising, primarily in the energy and resources sector.

Morn van der Merwe is the managing partner of Baker McKenzie's Johannesburg office and heads its Corporate and M&A Practice Group. He is recognised as a leading lawyer in South Africa by Chambers Global, Legal 500 and IFLR1000.

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