pictures and instructions on how to make fake rocks

how to make faux rocks : 9 steps (with pictures) - instructables

how to make faux rocks : 9 steps (with pictures) - instructables

In this instructible, I present my first attempt at making a faux rock. I tend to do things the hard way, but also consider everything a learning experience, an experiment, if you will. I have since learned there are easier methods to follow, but again, this is my first attempt. My eventual goal: landscape my front yard (southern CA) so that I don't have to water it ever again. Eventually, I will be able to build very large boulders using the techniques, and improvements I have learned, and save a ton of money on the rocks. Lets proceed:

To make this rock, I started with a small corrugated cardboard box. I use lots of cardboard, so have a good supply on hand as well. Old newspapers for filler, some chicken wire, and of course cement/concrete tools such as spreaders, trowels, buckets, access to water, cement, sand and or mortar mix, etc.

Thinking I could make a shape with cardboard as well, I made extensions out of cardboard that were glued onto the box with regular white glue. I let these sit over night to ensure that the glue was dried, and the bond was strong. It's sometimes easier to do these type of projects in stages, no hurry, no rush.

Seen in this picture is the rough rock, and the spaces in between the extensions are filled with newspaper. I even used some styrofoam as filler or extensions as well. It doesn't matter, you just want to make some support for your cement mix.

After enough newspaper and or styrofoam has been added to the "rock" form, it is all wrapped with chicken wire. I used the 2 inch size as it was cheaper, but 1 inch might be preferred. I made two layers of wire, thinking hole sizes would help hold the mortar better.

Following manufacturers guidelines, I use a mix of 3 parts sand to 1 part cement, with enough water to make a "stiff" mix of mortar. Using this basic formula, (it can be as much as 4 parts sand to 1 part cement), other variations can be tried. For example, I used a latex polymer tile set product as one part of the sand allotment. So it became: 2 parts sand, 1 part polymer, 1 part cement, plus the water. This adds some sticking power to the mortar mix, and makes it easier to control, I believe.

Using a 3 inch spreader knife (drywall), I spread the mixture over the rock form. I started at the bottom edge of the form so that any loose mortar could be picked up and added to the rock before moving on. I set my form on a lazy susan turntable, covered in waste cardboard to make it easier to work around the form, and of course the cardboard caught the inevitable drips of mortar.

After an overnight cure, the mortar was set enough that I could fill in any missed spots, or more commonly, places where the wire was showing through. To fill in these areas, I mixed some fresh polymer tile set, colored with cement colorant in a buff tone. This went on very easily, and towards the end, I added quite a bit of water to the mix, and using an old brush, covered the entire rock with the colored and diluted tile set. This dried very quickly, and I could stop here! To further experiment, I may try to add various weathering techniques,using acrylic paints to make "washes" of color, spattering with various colored paint, and so on. After curing for a few days, and finishing my experiments, I will seal it with a good exterior concrete sealer. This will help to protect the rock from the weather and prolong it's life.

Another method is to dig a hole in the ground the shape you want (upside down of course) then make a sticky mix of your concrete and line the hole. When dry just lift the hollow rock out and turn over. You can line the hole with plastic drop cloth and sprinkle in some colorant before adding the concrete and finish off later with other coloring methods if you like. The drop cloth provides nice handles with which to extract your masterpiece. No form to make!

Cool, stuffdone! Creativity is amazing in that one idea always springs more ideas, ad infinitum! I was just talking with my daughter about this and recognizing that there is simply not enough time to do it all. If I were still doing these, I definitely would try your method, although it seems you would be limited to a rather odd, flat bottom "rock" that wouldn't look natural...hmmm, I don't know. Have you done this? Do you have pictures? If not, has anyone else? Would love to see some results.

A friend of mine and I cooked this up several years ago. No pics sorry we did that at his place but I moved about 7 hours away since then. You can dig the hole any shape, depending of course on the consistency of the ground. Soft sand you might need to add water so it holds shape. The plastic will help and also add texture if you don't smooth it out.

You can make these with more texture. I've been looking at several websites for DIY rocks and the one at wikihow showed how to make it look more like a real rock with crevices, indents, pockmarks and other feature so it looked more like a real rock. (Just and FYI)

Inventive Yes, however, try using construction grade " Spray-Foam," In a can, about $ 5.00, in most Hardware stores, some chicken wire, and some twist ties for shaping your rock. then coat the form with WALL-CREAT,

WALLCREAT, is a mixture of Portland cement & Fiberglass strands all chopped up and in the mix, As the name implies, it's made for making walls by simply stacking cement blocks dry, then WallCreat is preparedand placed on the wall of blocks, covering them with at lease 1/4 inch thickness, & allowed to dry.Both Home Depot & Lowe's carried it, However,, if your in a hurry to make your rocks, try using .POST Quick set.Good-Luck

Hi, I want to make large hollow rocks that will work as a cat shelter for my outside cats. So I was thinking of using chicken wire and plaster of paris. Is this Wallcreat better? I would like something lightweight so I could create a bottom base and then the rock top which I could lift up to get the circular cat bed in and out to clean.

I saw another fellow who did this just using his trash, wadded it all up and secured it with fishing net. He lived near a fishery, so he could get the old netting for nothing, if I remember correctly. But I don't have the netting option, so this will work better for me, when I get there. Too much to do when you first buy a place! But I'm getting closer to the just aesthetics bit. Thanks for this!

I would suggest putting concrete on inside simply to make it stay put. In Wyoming, where I live, the wind is commonly at 30 mph. On other days it can be 50 or 60 mph(and these are mild storms ? wind getting worse with warming) so, unless ya want your rocks to become the neighbors rocks, I'd think of stayputability.

Thanks Nadine...sounds like you have a time with the wind...we get some at certain times of the year, but not really sever. Would you mind telling me where you saw this instructable? I am curious after several years, I am getting several comments. Thanks in advance!

I'm impressed I didn't think it would be that easy to make a cement based shamrock I have been using 341 ( South Bay plastics ) 2 part acetate plastic and impregnating foam with it , the result is a hard light shamrock that is paintable and looks good the problem with it is it is very light and has to be anchored . I think it can be the base for your cement process instead of the paper base , this stuff lasts I have parts on the driveway that are over 6 years old . my 2 cents

how to make fake rocks with concrete (with pictures) - wikihow

how to make fake rocks with concrete (with pictures) - wikihow

This article was co-authored by Anthony "TC" Williams. Anthony "TC" Williams is a Professional Landscaper in Idaho. He is the President and Founder of Aqua Conservation Landscape & Irrigation, an Idaho Registered Landscape Business Entity. With over 21 years of landscaping experience, TC has worked on projects such as the Idaho Botanical Garden in Boise, Idaho. He is a Idaho Registered Contractor and a previously Licensed Irrigator in the State of Texas. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. This article received 11 testimonials and 88% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. This article has been viewed 945,941 times.

Making artificial rock can benefit anyone, from the casual garden enthusiast to the landscaping professional who wants to spice up their garden life. Combining basic construction skills and artistic creativity, you can create artificial rocks with concrete that are virtually indistinguishable from naturally occurring stone. Sculpting landscape accents from concrete is an economical and lightweight alternative to large rock installations.

To make fake rocks with concrete, start by creating a wire form base with styrofoam or cardboard, then wrap the base in chicken wire. Next, use a flat pointed trowel to apply a layer of mortar to the wire frame, working from the bottom up. You can add realistic looking texture to the wet mortar using a trowel, sponge, or scouring pad, then let your rock cure for 30 days in a dry location! For more tips on sculpting your rocks, read on! Did this summary help you?YesNo

how to make fake rocks and boulders

how to make fake rocks and boulders

Do you find that there seems to be no use for the polystyrene packing material? Most people will throw it away as it cannot be burned or recycled. However, you may be surprised to know you can make fake rocks and boulders from this material.

The key to being able to make fake rocks and boulders is having the proper texture. You will be mixing sand and cement to create the coating that will be used. The proper tools and supplies will be crucial to the success of the project.

Being able to make fake rocks and boulders can be really fun. However, attention to detail will be important if you want a rock or boulder to look as authentic as possible. This means that the first attempt may not turn out as expected if you make a mistake

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Place your ad here Loading... More from my siteDIY Garden Projects With Rocks8 Ways To Use Removable Wallpaper25 Brilliant And Crafty Shoe Box Projects For You, Your Home, And The KidsHow To Make A Gorgeous Culinary Herb WreathHow To Make A Wind Spiral17 DIY Fabric Flowers To Make

Place your ad here Loading... More from my siteDIY Garden Projects With Rocks8 Ways To Use Removable Wallpaper25 Brilliant And Crafty Shoe Box Projects For You, Your Home, And The KidsHow To Make A Gorgeous Culinary Herb WreathHow To Make A Wind Spiral17 DIY Fabric Flowers To Make

More from my siteDIY Garden Projects With Rocks8 Ways To Use Removable Wallpaper25 Brilliant And Crafty Shoe Box Projects For You, Your Home, And The KidsHow To Make A Gorgeous Culinary Herb WreathHow To Make A Wind Spiral17 DIY Fabric Flowers To Make

homemade concrete formula for artificial rock | home guides | sf gate

homemade concrete formula for artificial rock | home guides | sf gate

When you can't find a rock in the size or shape desired for your garden, turn to a concrete mixture to make custom artificial rocks. Hypertufa, an artificial form of porous tufa rock, uses concrete, sand and peat moss to create lightweight stones that you can easily move throughout your outdoor space. While you can purchase hypertufa kits for making your own artificial rocks, you can find all the materials needed to make a homemade mixture at any home and garden center.

When you can't find a rock in the size or shape desired for your garden, turn to a concrete mixture to make custom artificial rocks. Hypertufa, an artificial form of porous tufa rock, uses concrete, sand and peat moss to create lightweight stones that you can easily move throughout your outdoor space. While you can purchase hypertufa kits for making your own artificial rocks, you can find all the materials needed to make a homemade mixture at any home and garden center.

Blend up to 1 part gravel to the wet mixture, if desired, to add texture to the rock. The amount of gravel added depends on the desired texture for the artificial stone. You can make artificial rocks without gravel, and the mixture would still be considered concrete because of the added sand.

Dig a hole in the ground to the desired shape for the artificial rock. Line the hole with plastic and fill it with the concrete mixture. Alternatively, you can pour the mixture into a form, such as a bucket or even an old pond liner, but the hole method allows you greater control over the rock shape.

Cover the mixture with sheet plastic and allow it to harden and cure for one to two weeks. Remove the plastic and mist the mixture with water to extend the curing time and make the rock stronger. Remove the rock from the hole at the end of the curing period.

Spray the entire rock with water daily for about one week to flush it of excess lime from the cement mixture. You can skip this step if the rock will be displayed away from plants, but the excess lime in the rock can increase the soil alkalinity, which can harm plants.

A former cake decorator and competitive horticulturist, Amelia Allonsy is most at home in the kitchen or with her hands in the dirt. She received her Bachelor's degree from West Virginia University. Her work has been published in the San Francisco Chronicle and on other websites.

how to make rocks for painting rocks with concrete

how to make rocks for painting rocks with concrete

Here at Ruffles and Rain Boots, we love hand painted rock art. But ever since me and the kiddo started painting, the most hard part is finding rocks. Weve persevered, though and found a way. Until lately when all our regular haunts seem to have run dry of good painting rocks. So, I started researching and found a way to make your own rocks for rock painting!

These concrete rocks are so easy to make and I had 6 done in less than 10 minutes, let them set overnight and we were ready to go! How cool is that?! If youre ready to get started making some DIY rocks and spreading those hand-painted kindness rocks throughout your neighborhood, lets get started.

This tutorial for how to make rocks for rock painting is super simple. And these concrete rocks are seriously perfect for painting anything. They're smooth, tough and pretty. Everything you need in a DIY rock.

Would you like inspiration delivered right to you each week? Sign up for the once-weekly Ruffles and Rain Boots newsletter and youll get that and more! Get access to the exclusive libraries full of free SVGs, hand lettering practice, and so much more.

I LOVE THIS IDEA! I had even thought about it myself. I ALREADY have my Quikrete but I'm still waiting for my molds in the mail. I would have never thought of adding color to them. BRILLIANT!! Way to go Sarah. Keep up the great work and I look forward to seeing more ideas from you. I am a rock painter now, my friend introduced me to the idea last year, and I went BERZERK! It makes me so happy to spread kind messages, paint cartoons or animals and hide my rocks. So fulfilling. Thank you again.

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how to make a fake rock: 13 steps (with pictures) - wikihow

how to make a fake rock: 13 steps (with pictures) - wikihow

This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. The wikiHow Video Team also followed the article's instructions and verified that they work. This article has been viewed 33,335 times. Learn more...

A fake rock can look just as good as the real deal! Whether you want artificial rocks for landscaping, stage productions, or as decor pieces, this is a fun and easy project. Use either a cardboard box or polystyrene foam to make the frame of your rock. Then cover the frame with paper mache to give it a rock-like texture. Let the paper mache dry, give it a few coats of spray paint, and then your fake rock is ready to use!

If you want to make a fake rock, first get a cardboard box thats around the same size you want your rock to be and push the corners so they become more rounded. Next, cut 1.5 by 10 inch-long strips from old newspapers. Then, make paper mache paste by mixing water with white glue in a bowl using a 1:1 ratio. One at a time, dip the newspaper strips in the paste and then stick them on your cardboard box. When youve covered your box with 2 layers of strips, let it dry for 24 hours. Once its dry, crumble some newspaper strips to make wads and paste these to the box to give your rock texture. After youve covered the box with 1 layer of newspaper wads, paste on 2 final layers of newspaper strips. Let the box dry for another 24 hours and then finish the look by spray-painting it all black or brown. For more tips, including how to add depth to your fake rock with paint, scroll down! Did this summary help you?YesNo

what are the best tips for making fake rocks? (with pictures)

what are the best tips for making fake rocks? (with pictures)

The best tips for making fake rocks include getting some real samples to look at for realistic shapes and color patterns. Whether the artificial rocks are for retaining walls, ponds or flower bed borders in yards or for another purpose such as a rock climbing wall or as scenery in a play, a few materials and a little experimenting with different techniques can produce good results. When making these rocks, perfection certainly shouldn't be the goal, as the real kind are full of imperfections.

Foam covered with chicken wire then with a cement mixture can be used to make large fake, or faux, rocks. A wheel barrow will hold a lot more of the mixture than most other containers will. Either a foam cutter or a box cutting tool can be used when making rocks out of spongy foam. A wire cutter is also needed; the wire helps stabilize the foam and gives the piece structure. When cutting the foam, it's quite fine to make uneven, jagged cuts, as real rock often has the same look.

Another way to make fake rocks is to use roofing sealant foam. This is a much faster method of making fake rocks than the foam, chicken wire and cement procedure as it involves simply spraying the sealant material onto a piece of cardboard. The cardboard should be fairly thick to serve as a base for the roofing sealant foam. The sprayed sealant should form a rock-like blob of the desired size and shape on the cardboard. After it dries, it can be painted either with layers of spray paint or with different acrylic paints sponged onto it.

Different neutral colored paints can be experimented with to create realistic looking finishes for fake rocks. The great thing when painting fake rocks is that there really can be no mistakes or way of ruining them because more paint layers or speckles can always be added. Sprinkling drops of paint on the fake rocks, letting them dry slightly and using a soft brush to blur them is just one of the techniques that can be used when making fake rocks. To get the speckles looking as realistic as possible, having a few real rocks of this variety on hand can be a good idea.

For fake landscaping rocks and others that will be outside, spraying a good, weatherproof clear sealer on top is usually a good idea. Even when making fake rocks for indoor purposes, spraying a clear acrylic sealer as a final coating can help the finish last longer. Protecting all types of do-it-yourself rocks with a sealer may take several coats depending on the brand.

I've never really thought about it, but I guess a lot of the rocks in theme parks and other places like that would be made this way, with some kind of cement or other sealer over the top of a wire structure. When I was a kid I was always blown away that they had managed to tunnel into the rock in so many places, but of course that was all part of the illusion.

@KoiwiGal - Polymer clay is good but it's not the only material available to people who want to craft some realistic looking rocks at home. It's not particularly good for larger projects since it's fairly expensive and you also need to be able to put it into an oven to dry it. There are lots of different clays available so really you can do some research to see what kind is going to be best. It seems to me like paper clay would be the most versatile since it will air dry and I think it has a fairly rough texture.

There are lots of different clays available so really you can do some research to see what kind is going to be best. It seems to me like paper clay would be the most versatile since it will air dry and I think it has a fairly rough texture.

If you're hoping to make fake rocks for jewelry or other craft purposes, I think the best way to go is to use polymer clay. There are a lot of instructions out there about how to make it look almost exactly like all kinds of different types of rock and stone and metal. It might take a little bit of practice, but the ability to really shape your "rock" with sculpting tools into whatever you want it to be is invaluable.

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