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latvians say estonian pulp mill won't hamper their plans

latvians say estonian pulp mill won't hamper their plans

Officials in Latvia rejected suggestions that the Estonian mill threatened the success of a new mill to be built in Latvia.Roar Paulsrud, a board member at Estonian Cell, told the Baltic News Service the company had selected a location for its plant and detailed planning had started. The facility is expected to be finished by the end of 2003 and to be working at full capacity in 2004. It will require an investment of 1.4 billion kroons ($82.35 million)."We've worked in close cooperation with the Estonian energy company Eesti Energia, gas utility Eesti Gaas and Estonian railway company Eesti Raudtee," Paulsrud said. "Kehra has all the infrastructure needed for this kind of factory."The Kehra facility will employ between 70 and 80 people, but about 100 more will be employed in related industries.Estonian Cell and the Estonian State Forest Management Center signed Oct. 9 a long-term agreement under which the center will supply approximately 140,000 cubic meters of aspen wood to the facility annually.Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Roar Paulsrud, a board member at Estonian Cell, told the Baltic News Service the company had selected a location for its plant and detailed planning had started. The facility is expected to be finished by the end of 2003 and to be working at full capacity in 2004. It will require an investment of 1.4 billion kroons ($82.35 million)."We've worked in close cooperation with the Estonian energy company Eesti Energia, gas utility Eesti Gaas and Estonian railway company Eesti Raudtee," Paulsrud said. "Kehra has all the infrastructure needed for this kind of factory."The Kehra facility will employ between 70 and 80 people, but about 100 more will be employed in related industries.Estonian Cell and the Estonian State Forest Management Center signed Oct. 9 a long-term agreement under which the center will supply approximately 140,000 cubic meters of aspen wood to the facility annually.Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

"We've worked in close cooperation with the Estonian energy company Eesti Energia, gas utility Eesti Gaas and Estonian railway company Eesti Raudtee," Paulsrud said. "Kehra has all the infrastructure needed for this kind of factory."The Kehra facility will employ between 70 and 80 people, but about 100 more will be employed in related industries.Estonian Cell and the Estonian State Forest Management Center signed Oct. 9 a long-term agreement under which the center will supply approximately 140,000 cubic meters of aspen wood to the facility annually.Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

The Kehra facility will employ between 70 and 80 people, but about 100 more will be employed in related industries.Estonian Cell and the Estonian State Forest Management Center signed Oct. 9 a long-term agreement under which the center will supply approximately 140,000 cubic meters of aspen wood to the facility annually.Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Estonian Cell and the Estonian State Forest Management Center signed Oct. 9 a long-term agreement under which the center will supply approximately 140,000 cubic meters of aspen wood to the facility annually.Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Paulsrud said Estonia Cell had already found a buyer for the plant's entire output for the next 10 years but declined to name the buyer.Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Estonian Cell belongs to the Norwegian Larvik Cell of which Paulsrud is the majority owner. Larvik Cell's turnover was 340 million kroons last year.Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Meanwhile negotiations continue in Latvia over plans for a pulp mill near the eastern city of Rezekne. Arvids Ozols, deputy state secretary at the Agriculture Ministry, said the project was on schedule and that the Estonian mill did not threaten the success of the Latvian project."We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

"We're still working and negotiating. The Estonian mill will be different from ours. It will use different technology and create a different kind of product."Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Ozols' comments were echoed by Jukka Laitinen, president of Baltic Pulp, the company set up to create the Latvian mill."The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

"The Estonian mill is so small it won't affect us at all. Their capacity of 130,000 tons of pulp per year is only 20 percent of the planned capacity of our mill," Laitinen said.Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

Experts have already said that the region might not be able to sustain two pulp mills, but Laitinen rejects this and says the region has enough raw material for two mills."If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

"If the mill in Estonia is so small, the raw material will come from Estonia," he said. "Probably they won't have any need to import raw materials."The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

The Baltic Pulp company comprises the timber companies Sodra and Metsaliitto of Sweden and Finland respectively, and the Latvian state. It has been said the mill would bring an investment of 1 billion euros ($909 million) to Latvia, making it the biggest foreign investment package the country has known. The mill is expected to be operational in 2005.Ozols believes it will boost Latvia's gross domestic product by at least 3 percent.

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cats mill: latvias coin of the year 2019 - coinsweekly

cats mill: latvias coin of the year 2019 - coinsweekly

The collector coin Cats Mill dedicated to the literary work of the Latvian poet, prose-writer and politician Krlis Skalbe (18791945) has been voted Latvias Coin of the Year 2019 in the traditional public vote.

The graphic design of the collector coin Cats Mill has been created by Elna Braslia, whereas the author of the plaster model is Ligita Franckevia. This has been the young and talented Elna Braslias debut in coin art. She is publicly known as a book illustrator: more than 20 childrens books with Elna Braslias illustrations, including the Art Detectives series, have already been published. Her first animated film Jacob, Mimmi and the Talking Dogs has also been recently released to the cinemas.

The coin features the Cat, Black Cat and King the characters of the fairy tale Cats Mill contained in Krlis Skalbes collection Winter Tales (1913) that has been included in the Latvian Cultural Canon. The moral of the fairy tale is: do not spread evil and learn to forgive. Other values taught by this fairy tale are honesty, diligence and love. The fairy tales multi-faceted message is useful at any age. The coin has been struck by UAB Lietuvos monet kalykla (Lithuania).

It is symbolic that we announce the coin of 2019 in these globally challenging times when universal human values, including empathy, care for those in need of help, readiness to make sacrifices for the common good, once again come to the fore. Fairy tales by Krlis Skalbe contain a moral code which, deeply rooted in the consciousness of our nation, helps and invigorates people in hard times, stresses Jnis Blms, Chairman of the Coin Design Commission of Latvijas Banka and Head of the Cash Department of Latvijas Banka.

This year, too, the expert commission of the Latvian National Museum of Art (LNMM), composed of Mra Lce, LNMM Director, Inese Baranovska, Head of the Decorative Art and Design Department, and Elita Ansone, Head of Collections and Scientific Research Department, have selected the most outstanding coin in terms of artistic solution, whereas the Culture Information Systems Centre (KISC) has announced the preference of library users.

LNNM named the silver collector coin of a specific shape dedicated to the creative heritage of Niklvs Strunke (18941966), Latvian painter, graphic artist and stage designer, the most outstanding coin in terms of artistic solution. The graphic design of the collector coin Niklvs Strunke has been created by artist Paulis Liepa, whereas the author of the plaster model is Ivars Drulle.

Mra Lce, LNMM Director: The coin features the works by Niklvs Strunke in a laconic yet absolutely convincing way; they show his signature style in the period of classic modernism and have been included in the Latvian Cultural Canon. The composition of the round coin with a cut edge brilliantly evokes association with Man Entering a Room and Self-Portrait with a Doll, the two paintings by Strunke featured on the obverse and reverse of the coin where we see impressive intensity differences of frostings used. The letter design characteristic of the style of 1920s1930s has been used. The shape and finish of the coin, the interaction of the text and images create a laconic, powerful and impressive visuality.

The special award from KISC was awarded to the coin Cats Mill. Sandra Ozolia, Deputy Director of KISC: We are happy that, despite the non-standard circumstances when libraries are closed to the public, many of the libraries have still found a solution and have actively invited their readers to participate in the traditional beautiful Latvias Coin of the Year event organised by Latvijas Banka. We participate every year, in cooperation with the digital learning resource letonika.lv. The public libraries of Latvian municipalities have nominated their candidate for the most beautiful coin of the year award this year as well, and it is not a coincidence that the winning coin in a libraries vote was a coin based on a literary work Cats Mill. We encourage you to read Krlis Skalbes fairy tale in the digital reading room at letonika.lv, because the Cats message embodied by the coin is of a particular importance at this difficult time when the society mobilises itself to secure the victory of the good.

Out of all the registered participants in the vote for the best collector coin of 2019, twelve will receive one of the nominated coins. The list of the lucky winners will be published on the website of the Bank of Latvia, and the winners will be contacted personally as to how to receive the coins.

In support of the #stayhome and #E-culture initiatives, Latvijas Banka invited the population to use the virtual activities developed within the framework of Latvias Coin of the Year to find information on our cultural and historical values immortalized on Latvian coins.

The erudition game Inquire about Cultural Symbols on Latvian Coins available in a digital environment provided an opportunity to test ones knowledge about the coins issued in 2019 and the values they represent. Overall, the game was played by nearly 400 participants in 122 libraries.

Latvian coins have earned high international respect and a number of prestigious awards, including the last one received in February 2020, when the innovative Honey Coin, created by designer Artrs Analts, was announced the Coin of the Year at the most prestigious international competition Coin of the Year Awards (COTY). The Honey Coin was also awarded the main prize in the public vote Latvias Coin of the Year 2018, and it was recognised the best coin issued by Latvijas Banka in 2018.

Since 2004, when Latvijas Banka organised the first public vote, the following coins have been named Latvias Coin of the Year: Coin of Time, Baron Mnchhausen, Coin of Digits, Coin of Time II, Lucky Coin, Coin of Water, Amber Coin, Fog mists the pane, 5-lats silver collector coin, Baby Coin, Baroque of Courland, Fairy Tale Coin I. Five cats, Fairy Tale Coin II. Hedgehogs Coat, Smith Forges in the Sky and Honey Coin.

Since 1993, Latvijas Banka has issued 98 lats collector coins and 35 euro collector coins, with over 50 Latvian artists having participated in designing them. The Coin Design Commission of Latvijas Banka (the former Commission for the Thematic Concept of the Banknotes and Coins), operational since 12 November 1993, plays an important role in the coin issuing process. The Commission consists of the employees of Latvijas Banka, outstanding Latvian experts of art and culture as well as artists and scientists.

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