raymond mill king market & creamery

mill-king market and creamery: the only non-homogenized milk source in texas - business profiles - texasrealfood

mill-king market and creamery: the only non-homogenized milk source in texas - business profiles - texasrealfood

A specialty store hidden in a small farm in Mcgregor, Mill-King Market and Creamery is offering natural, local, and organic food. They specialize in low temperature pasteurized, non-homogenized milk, cream, cheese, and yogurt.

They also carry eggs, grass-fed beef, pastured pork and poultry, bone broth, honey, and other minimally processed food. This grass-feed dairy farm makes the best non-homogenized milk you will ever find in Texas!

Mill-King focuses on making the preeminent dairy of Texas, bearing passion about what they do and the quality of dairy they produce for consumers always incredibly fresh and consistent with a very good value for the quality.

Aside from the dairy products, Mill-king also offers unique organic products, like Salsa, organic non-GMO cereals, organic frozen mango, ice cream, as well as a varied collection or health food and specialty items.

A third-generation dairy family turned farmstead processor owns Mill-King Market and Creamery. Several factors, like their own food allergies and the economics of dairying, were large contributors for them to find a better way to the dairy, better dairy products that did not trigger allergies, and better compensation for dairying.

The Miller family began milking cows in Crawford and McGregor (outside of Waco) in the early 1940s when they moved to the area. They have continually operated a dairy in a single process from then on until 2010.

It was in 2010 that they decided to make and change their operations. In the succeeding year, they built a plant to process milk and make cheese, and their products finally hit the market in early 2012.

The fact that they process their own milk (as well as other local dairies) already sets them apart from other local farms or dairies in Texas. Mill-King Market and Creamery have specific guidelines to follow for animal care, feeding, milk quality, and processing.

Their milk is low temperature pasteurized (vat) and is not homogenized. Processing the milk at a lower and slower temperature allows much of the natural goodness to stay in the milk. Not homogenizing milk, according to research, allows the body to better process the fat in it.

They also do not put synthetic additives, water, or preservatives in the milk. Their cattle are also grass-fed, ensuring that the milk source is as healthy as can be with no GMOs involved, only sustainable farming methods.

If youre on your search for the perfect sidekick to your favorite dessert, in your favorite coffee, or pretty much anywhere you use milk, then Mill-King milk is the right choice! Their cheddar cheese also makes an amazing mac & cheese or gourmet grilled cheese sandwich.

Bestsellers from Mill-King Market and Creamery include their whole milk and their heavy whipping cream. Their Barista Blend is a favorite of baristas and coffee shops across the entire state. Their milk and cream are also used widely in ice cream shops and by small cheesemakers!

Retail customers can get Mill-King products at Whole Foods Market, Natural Grocers, your local natural food or farm store. You can also find their products at home delivery services in many areas. They also wholesale their products through distributors or with the use of their truck.

mill-king market & creamery

mill-king market & creamery

Waco, like many growing Texas cities, is ever expanding into the countryside. But just west of Waco, away from the bustle, in the small town of McGregor, sits a still-bucolic, beautiful parcel of land dotted with grazing cows and owned by some of the nicest people youd ever care to meet. Mill-King Market & Creamery is one of a growing number of Texas dairy farms on the road to abandoning the conventional route to marketing milk.

We are shrinking, not expanding like a conventional dairy has to do to survive, says Craig. Hed love to see the dairy at 60 cows, which would allow his parents to slow down a little. Seven days a week for twenty years is just too much. To that end, the Millers have developed a select herd of animals that produce premium milk with the highest milk fat and protein content. They still have a conventional herd, but are in the process of slowly reducing it in favor of having a smaller, exceptional herd. The conventional herd still produces milk, which is sold through a co-op, but the premium milk is reserved as a house brand, and is being marketed through select retailers. The premium milk is also used to make the several in-house varieties of Mill-King cheeses.The Millers know where their premium milk ends up because it is processed on the farm. Mill-King sells some raw milk at the farm store, and markets low-temperature pasteurized milk at farmers markets, as well. They are working to increase their distribution without sacrificing the quality of their products. Along with their cheeses, they also sell beef and eggs.

We control one hundred percent of the process, Craig says. When asked about the rarity of a start-to-finish, independent dairy where a consumer could actually document the exact origin of their glass of milk, he says theyve been moving to keep tabs on, better control of, and make available that high-quality glass of milk for 30 years. Mill-King also closely manages their breeding programworking to preserve and enhance the traits of their best cows. Right now, our Holsteins are producing milk of 4.5 percent butterfatricher than your average Jersey.

Charlotte Miller, affectionately known as Shorty, is the matriarch of the family. Craig boasts that she takes care of the baby calves until theyre six weeks of ageteaching them how to drink out of a bucket and doctoring them. It is the hardest job on the dairy, he says. She can also be found in the cheese-production room where she packages milk and prepares for the next round of cheesemaking.Billy Miller, Craigs father, oversees the herds feed intake, the health of the herd and personnel issues. Craigs wife, Rhianna, manages cheese production and handles the accounting and scheduling. And, Casie Velin, Craigs sister, helps out at the farmers markets and whenever the dairy needs a spare hand. Craig not only manages the reproductive and genetic health of the Mill-King herd, but also consults with other dairies on genetic and reproductive issues. The entire family lives on, or around, the dairy.Although Mill-King has not sought organic certificationan expensive and lengthy processthey have chosen to reduce their presence in the conventional-milk chain of commerce, where all of the milks from various dairies, regardless of quality, are combined. Craig says that in the conventional system, a dairy is not rewarded for producing a premium product. If Im producing a premium product, I still get paid the same. Nor does he believe that a certified-organic label necessarily guarantees a better product.The Millers have chosen to pursue the independent route in order to have complete control over the premium milk-production processfrom breeding to bottling. When asked what makes Mill-King different from an average conventional dairy, Craig responds that it has a lot to do with how they take care of their cows. The cows have clean bedding and their overall cleanliness is monitored, as well. They are pasture fed, their nutrition is closely documented and the dairy runs heat-abatement systems to keep the cows comfortable in the hot months. A defining difference, notes Craig, is simply the general day-to-day care of the animals that my parents give from birth on.A smaller herd, a full-cycle dairy, excellent animal care and quality products are the priorities of this Texas dairy. When you drink a cold glass of Mill-King milk, or nibble on their exceptional Asiago cheese, you know precisely what you are getting: day-in, day-out attention to detail. In sum, youre getting the passion and dedication of three generations.

mill-king market & creamery: a food allergy inspires this family farm to rethink how it produces milk - food - the austin chronicle

mill-king market & creamery: a food allergy inspires this family farm to rethink how it produces milk - food - the austin chronicle

254/486-8999 www.mill-kingmarket.com Rhianna Miller thought she was allergic to milk. "I would be sick for two days after drinking a glass," she remembers. For 16 years she avoided milk and everything made from it. So when she ended up married to Craig Miller, a third-generation dairy farmer in McGregor, Texas, it became a huge family joke. "It just struck everyone as hilarious," Miller says. "Here was a dairyman married to a girl who was allergic to milk!" Photo by John Anderson Then a friend suggested that she try raw milk, which was easily done. Surprisingly, she found that she had no difficulty digesting it. "That is what got us started thinking about the way milk is produced, which in turn took us on a journey that eventually led us back to producing a much higher quality product," says Miller. Mill-King now produces low-temperature pasteurized, nonhomogenized milk, which is far more digestible than conventionally pasteurized milk. Instead of being heated to 190 degrees for a few seconds, their milk is heated to 145 degrees for a full half hour. This kills any potential pathogens in the milk, but allows the beneficial enzymes, which are crucial to proper digestion, to be preserved. Homogenization is the process of evenly suspending the milkfat (cream) throughout the milk. It isn't necessary, and just about the only purpose it serves is to obscure the quality of the milk. Recently, scientists have been discovering evidence that homogenization may actually be harmful, because it allows microscopic globules of milkfat to cross into the bloodstream instead of being digested. Mill-King sells milk ($7 a gallon, $4 a half-gallon), cream ($7 a pint), half-and-half ($5 a pint), and a variety of cheeses: Cheddar curds, Cheddar block, fresh Mozzarella, and aged raw milk cheese ($6 for 8 oz.). They also sell yogurt ($6 a pound) in vanilla, berry, mango, and plain flavors. The demand for Mill-King products in Austin is tremendous, so much so that the Millers can barely keep up. Currently all their products are available at the Sunset Valley Farmers Market, the Republic Square SFC Market, the Cedar Park Farmers Market, the HOPE Farmers Market, the Mueller Farmers Market, and the Lone Star Farmers Market. Whole Foods Market, People's Pharmacy, In.gredients, and Wheatsville, among others, also carry Mill-King milk, and it is available through Greenling and Farmhouse Delivery.

Rhianna Miller thought she was allergic to milk. "I would be sick for two days after drinking a glass," she remembers. For 16 years she avoided milk and everything made from it. So when she ended up married to Craig Miller, a third-generation dairy farmer in McGregor, Texas, it became a huge family joke. "It just struck everyone as hilarious," Miller says. "Here was a dairyman married to a girl who was allergic to milk!"

Then a friend suggested that she try raw milk, which was easily done. Surprisingly, she found that she had no difficulty digesting it. "That is what got us started thinking about the way milk is produced, which in turn took us on a journey that eventually led us back to producing a much higher quality product," says Miller.

Mill-King now produces low-temperature pasteurized, nonhomogenized milk, which is far more digestible than conventionally pasteurized milk. Instead of being heated to 190 degrees for a few seconds, their milk is heated to 145 degrees for a full half hour. This kills any potential pathogens in the milk, but allows the beneficial enzymes, which are crucial to proper digestion, to be preserved. Homogenization is the process of evenly suspending the milkfat (cream) throughout the milk. It isn't necessary, and just about the only purpose it serves is to obscure the quality of the milk. Recently, scientists have been discovering evidence that homogenization may actually be harmful, because it allows microscopic globules of milkfat to cross into the bloodstream instead of being digested.

Mill-King sells milk ($7 a gallon, $4 a half-gallon), cream ($7 a pint), half-and-half ($5 a pint), and a variety of cheeses: Cheddar curds, Cheddar block, fresh Mozzarella, and aged raw milk cheese ($6 for 8 oz.). They also sell yogurt ($6 a pound) in vanilla, berry, mango, and plain flavors.

The demand for Mill-King products in Austin is tremendous, so much so that the Millers can barely keep up. Currently all their products are available at the Sunset Valley Farmers Market, the Republic Square SFC Market, the Cedar Park Farmers Market, the HOPE Farmers Market, the Mueller Farmers Market, and the Lone Star Farmers Market. Whole Foods Market, People's Pharmacy, In.gredients, and Wheatsville, among others, also carry Mill-King milk, and it is available through Greenling and Farmhouse Delivery.

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