separate iron used

how do you separate sand, salt and iron filings?

how do you separate sand, salt and iron filings?

Gather your materialsGather the sand, salt and iron filing mixture; a magnet; a paper towel; a cup of warm water; an empty cup; and a piece of filter paper. Use the magnet to remove the ironSpread the sand, salt and iron mixture on a flat surface. Wrap the magnet in the paper towel. Use the magnet to remove the iron by pulling it across the surface of the mixture. The filings stick to the magnet while the sand and salt are left behind. Remove the paper towel from the magnet to collect the filings. Use warm water to dissolve the saltPut the remaining salt and sand mixture into the glass of warm water, and stir until all the salt has dissolved. Remove the sand from the salt waterHold the filter paper over the empty cup. Pour the saltwater and sand mixture through the filter and into the empty cup. The sand is caught in the filter, while the salt remains in solution in the warm water.

Spread the sand, salt and iron mixture on a flat surface. Wrap the magnet in the paper towel. Use the magnet to remove the iron by pulling it across the surface of the mixture. The filings stick to the magnet while the sand and salt are left behind. Remove the paper towel from the magnet to collect the filings.

Hold the filter paper over the empty cup. Pour the saltwater and sand mixture through the filter and into the empty cup. The sand is caught in the filter, while the salt remains in solution in the warm water.

steinert hgf used to separate iron particles from process waters steinert

steinert hgf used to separate iron particles from process waters steinert

The finest magnetic particles, usually less than 10 m, can be separated from liquids and emulsions using the STEINERT matrix separator with "switchable" permanent magnets. Separation rates of well over 80% are common.

A typical field of application is the treatment of process water from degreasing baths in the steel industry. Many steel companies have at least one such STEINERT HGF in operation. The fluid circuit is thus closed to almost 100%.

Reliable and efficient separation of ferrous particles in the treatment of process fluids is a difficult challenge for the steel industry. Rather than regeneration, the complete cooling water circuit is usually replaced at regular intervals due to the lack of appropriate technology. Our STEINERT HGF high gradient magnetic filter is targeted at precisely this task both as a stand-alone procedure and to protect membrane systems. Fine ferrous particles down to 1 m are separated out in a fine-mesh filter matrix in the STEINERT HGF and with a separation success of over 80%.

A wire matrix in the closed system is magnetised by switchable permanent magnets. Very high magnetic field gradients are generated on these wires causing the fine iron parts to reliably accumulate there. After a few minutes of separation in the batch feed, the matrix is cleaned within a few seconds by a vigorous rinsing impulse. The resulting ferrous pre-concentration is generally fed to a downstream STEINERT NTS wet drum magnetic separator. The iron content in the generated sludge is further concentrated using the STEINERT NTS. We supply the STEINERT HGF as a complete sorting system including piping and controller.

more about magnetic separation

more about magnetic separation

Last month, we wrote about how magnets are assembled for magnetic separation applications attracting iron, steel, or other ferromagnetic bits to get contaminants out of other materials. It was a great example of some specific ways that magnets are selected and assembled for this task.

What if there was a way to use magnets to separate metals that are NOT attracted to magnets? If we could separate aluminum cans (which magnets dont stick to) from other, non-metallic trash, would that be amazing?

This demonstration is fairly straightforward. We constructed a conveyor belt that has a roller covered with magnets. The magnets are arranged with alternating poles facing out, which provides a strong magnetic hold.

The results are pretty much what you would expect. The stuff that is not attracted to magnets just falls straight down. The ferromagnetic bits that are attracted to magnets stay stuck to the conveyor belt a little longer, and are dropped a bit further back.

The answer lies with Eddy Currents. If you move a magnet near a piece of conductive metal, the moving magnetic field induces currents in the metal. The spinning currents act like little magnets, making a repelling force between the magnet and the metal.

In that earlier article, we showed a few classic demonstrations of this phenomenon, such as a magnet falling slowly through a tube or sliding slowly down an aluminum surface. If we have enough magnetic field strength and relative speed between the magnets and the metal, the magnets exert a force on the metal.

For a demonstration, we'll use another conveyor belt arrangement. The key to eddy current separation is to get the magnets moving much faster than the material on the conveyor belt. We need to get the magnets moving a lot faster than the stuff were separating.

We put a stationary tube around the spinning magnets, and slid a conveyor belt slowly over it. Inside the tube, we spin the magnets around at great speed. The quickly moving and changing magnetic fields provide a force in bits of aluminum thanks to eddy currents. This gives these materials an extra nudge off the conveyor belt, throwing them off rather than just dropping them.

Thats really a general question looking for a specific answer. It depends! The magnets you choose depend on a wide number of variables, including the design of your machine, conveyor belt, desired strength, distance from the magnets to the materials, etc.

We used some BX884DCS magnets for our iron separator. Our Countersunk Magnets are popular for this sort of thing, since they are easy to assemble. Most of the actual, industrial separators weve seen use much larger magnets like the 2" x 1" x 1/2" thick BY0X08DCS. We chose smaller ones because it was simpler for our scaled-down model.

We used 2" x 3/8" x 1/4" thick BY064 plain blocks for the Eddy Current Separator shown in the second video. It was a good size for our scale, and they worked well. We actually chose these specific magnets because we had a small stack set aside that had scratched plating. Other similar block magnet sizes would have worked as well.

how can we separate a mixture of two solids - a plus topper

how can we separate a mixture of two solids - a plus topper

Many of the materials around us are mixtures. These mixtures have two or more than two substances mixed in them. It may not be possible to use a mixture as such in homes and in industries. We may require only one (or two) separate constituents of a mixture for our use. So, we have to separate the various mixtures into their individual constituents to make them useful in our daily life.

1. Separation by a suitable solvent : In some cases, one constituent of a mixture is soluble in a particular liquid solvent whereas the other constituent is insoluble in it. This difference in the solubilities of the constituents of a mixture can be used to separate them. Ex. Sugar is soluble in water whereas sand is insoluble in it, so a mixture of sugar and sand can be separated by using water as solvent.

2. Separation by sublimation : The changing of a solid directly into vapours on heating, and of vapours into solid on cooling is called sublimation. The solid substance which undergoes sublimation is said to sublime. The process of sublimation is used to separated those substances from a mixture which sublime on heating. The solid substance obtained by cooling the vapour is known as sublimate. Ex. Ammonium chloride, Iodine, Camphor,. can be separated from a mixture by sublimation.

3. Separation by a magnet : Iron is attracted by a magnet. This property of iron is used to separate it from a mixture. So, if a mixture contains iron as one of the constituents, it can be separated by using a magnet. Ex. A mixture of iron filings and sulphur power can be separated by using a magnet. This is because iron filings are attracted by a magnet but sulphur is not attracted by a magnet.

which method should be used to separate iron from sulphur - science - separation of substances - 11051707

which method should be used to separate iron from sulphur - science - separation of substances - 11051707

The separation of sulfur and iron can only occur if the two compounds have not chemically reacted. It is thus important to note that if the mixture between the iron fillings and sulfur is heated, a chemical compound called iron sulfide is formed. To separate iron and sulfur that have not chemically reacted, two methods are magnetism and the use of carbon disulfide.

During the process of separating iron and sulfur, in case of an iron ore, the finely crashed iron ore is washed in a stream of water. During this period, the other particles other than iron are washed away while the iron material sinks. These materials are then dried and separated using a magnet, since iron is magnetic.

If it is a mixture of iron fillings and sulfur, a magnet is used to separate the Iron fillings from sulfur particles since the sulfur particles are not attracted by the magnet. To make sure the magnet picks all the pieces of iron fillings, you can stir the container using the magnetic bar, and the iron fillings will stick on the magnetic bar. Swirling the mixture with the magnet under the container is also another method that can be used, since the Iron filings will fall towards the place where the magnet is.

Whereas sulfur is insoluble in water, it dissolves when mixed with carbon disulfide. Because of this, carbon disulfide is used to separate iron from sulfur. The mixture of sulfur and iron is put in a carbon disulfide solution. After shaking well, the sulfur component dissolves in the carbon disulfide solution while iron does not. The new formed solution is then filtered and iron particles are left behind. To separate sulfur from carbon disulfide, the solvent is evaporated, which leaves a residue of pure sulfur.

The separation of sulfur and iron can only occur if the two compounds have not chemically reacted. It is thus important to note that if the mixture between the iron fillings and sulfur is heated, a chemical compound called iron sulfide is formed. To separate iron and sulfur that have not chemically reacted, two methods are magnetism and the use of carbon disulfide.

During the process of separating iron and sulfur, in case of an iron ore, the finely crashed iron ore is washed in a stream of water. During this period, the other particles other than iron are washed away while the iron material sinks. These materials are then dried and separated using a magnet, since iron is magnetic.

If it is a mixture of iron fillings and sulfur, a magnet is used to separate the Iron fillings from sulfur particles since the sulfur particles are not attracted by the magnet. To make sure the magnet picks all the pieces of iron fillings, you can stir the container using the magnetic bar, and the iron fillings will stick on the magnetic bar. Swirling the mixture with the magnet under the container is also another method that can be used, since the Iron filings will fall towards the place where the magnet is.

Whereas sulfur is insoluble in water, it dissolves when mixed with carbon disulfide. Because of this, carbon disulfide is used to separate iron from sulfur. The mixture of sulfur and iron is put in a carbon disulfide solution. After shaking well, the sulfur component dissolves in the carbon disulfide solution while iron does not. The new formed solution is then filtered and iron particles are left behind. To separate sulfur from carbon disulfide, the solvent is evaporated, which leaves a residue of pure sulfur.

how would you separate a mixture of sand, iron nails, and sea salt?

how would you separate a mixture of sand, iron nails, and sea salt?

We all know that nails are attracted to magnets. So first, use a magnet to attract the iron nails. We also know that salt dissolves in water, while sand does not. So add water to dissolve the salt and leave out the sand. Now, filter the sand out, and then heat the salt solution to get rid of the water. There you have it.

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